OCR Interpretation


The Mid-island mail. (Medford, N.Y.) 1935-1941, January 01, 1941, Image 2

Image and text provided by Suffolk Cooperative Library System

Persistent link: http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071326/1941-01-01/ed-1/seq-2/


Thumbnail for 2
Mt SSnai Dredging Is Up to War Dept. Instead of Trustees So Attorney Rules , as Project Is Only for Restoring Channel Orig- inally Dug- , Same Auspices The War department granted per- mission to the Seaboard Sand -and Gravel company about a dozen years ago to dredge a 15-foot-deep channel into Mt. Sinai. Therefore the Sea- board firm ' s pending app lication to redredge the original channel is a matter for the Wai' department to decide. This was the decision given by Brookhaven Town Counsel Ralp h J. Hawkins to the Town Board of Trus- tees recently on the question of the pending application , which had been under consideration by the trustees. Mr. Hawkins cited the case of Blue- points company vs. Briggs , the issues of which elosely parallelled those in- volved- in 'th e Seaboard app lication , which has met with stormy opposi- tion from residents and civic groups of Mt. Sinai and vicinity . The Blue- points company, case , it was explained , went to the United States Supreme court , which upheld a move to re- dredge certain channels. Mr. Hawkins said that in his opin- ion , the question of .permission for the .dredging work contemplated by the Seaboard, concern \ would be one for the town trustees to decide only in the event the re dredging of the channel , which exten 'ds through town- owned underwater lands , exceeded the original depth of 15 feet or the originaj . lines. After the original dredging was done with the approval of tlie War department , Mr. Hawkins said , the waterway came under federal con- trol , and it therefore remained for the federal authorities to grant permis- sion for any redredg ing necessary to restore the depth. In the event the redredging- was to be done to the 15-foot depth , the only question left for the town trus- tees to decide , Mr. Hawkins said , might be the matter of establishing spoils area where the dredged mate- rial would be placed. i While the Seaboard application was being considered at the town trus- tees ' meeting, a War department hearing was being held in New York on the Seaboard's application . for War department approval , which would have to be obtained under any. cir- cumstances. The opposition recently voiced before the town trustees was echoed by North Shore residents and civic groups at the New York -hear- ing. The War department engineers in charge . of the hearing reserved de- cision. As the result of a complaint filed with the Town trustees by Selah B. Strong, of Stron g ' s Neck , . .. to the effect that oil was being carelessly spilled on the waters of Port Jefferson Harbor by a dredgin g firm operating there and that sand was being dumped along the shore ' in that vicinity with- out regard to local property owners , the town trustees- voted to notify the dredging firm , the Great Eastern Gravel firm company, to \ remove any material that had been placed in the harbor in violation of its contract\ with the town trustees. Fines Past Year In Town ' s Courts Totalled $4 , 367 Figure Decreases from 1 939 High to 1938 Level State Takes Larger Share Than Toivn Retains — Civil Cases Amount to $1 , 165—Jail Terms Affect Figures Brookhaven town ' s eig ht justices of the peace collected , a total of $4 , 367 m fines m criminal and traffic cases dur- ing 1940 , it was shown Satur- day when their accounts were audited and approved at a special meeting of the town board. The $4 , 367 figure , represen ting a. decrease of nearly 33 per cent under that of 1939 , during which gb, fol» was collected , is on a par with the collections of 1938 , which totalled $4 , 241. Of the $4 , 367 figure , $2 , 386 went to the state and $1 , 981 reverted to the town treasury. The 1939 sum o± $6 , 618 was divided. $4 , 070 to the state , and $2 , 548 to the town. Besides the proceeds from criminal and traffic court cases , the ei ght jus- tices also turned into the town cof - fers a total of $1 , 165.75 in fees from civil cases. This represented a drap of about $200 under last year ' s figure of $1 , 367. Of this year ' s fees of $1 , - 165.75 , more than 50 per cent was collected by Judge Philipp A. Hatle- nier of Patchogue. The total collections in criminal and traffic court include fees for cases brought before these judges by State police , as well as to^\^n officers. The justices audited one another ' s books, A board committee also audit- ed the accounts of Supervisor Edgar A. Sharp from January 1 to Decem- ber 15. Following the usual proced- ure , the auditing of Supervisor Sharp ' s accounts for the remaining half-month of the year will be done after January 1. For the third successive vear. Judge Harold C. Sorenson of Lake Grove led the board in fines collected. His total was $1 , 469. This was fol- io-wed in order by Judge Donald W. Shaw of Heliport with a total of $821 , and Judge Arthur E. Reich of Med- ford with $582. Other judges whose, accounts were audited were Judges ICenson D. Mer- rill of Rocky Point , Walter 11. Nevins of Stony Brook , Carl Ruhland of East Setauket and Ulysses Johnson of Center Moriches. A summary of the fines and fees from criminal and traffic court cases , and civil fees , follows: Justice Total 'l\> 'L' 0 Ci v jj of Pence Fin«s Towns Slate F<iea oi • . „„, . (To Town ) ghnw $ 821 S337 SI.S I .«-) ! .10 Ruhland .. 52G 2-115 28M 1G.80 Nevins .. . ]4 50 S6** r >S2 287 Mir, ns ' . ' or, Merrill .... ,H2* 207 215 5 w> no Soronsoii l . -JfiO <;s;i 7s r, Johnson :n () it\i j lia Hnttemer 217 i>? 100 ' r , 'i\ \ ,i6 T i XT 1 ' 3 ' ! 7 , S, ; !)S l * 2 - 38(J S1 . 1C5.75 .Judge Nevins ' showing in the 1940 report is explained by the fact that he had been ill for a large part of tlie year. m£? I 5 mentlnfi: on tlK ' dl '°P'»' h »s own 1940 figures , as compared with those of a year ago , Judge Shaw said , \Mv courtroom records far 1 !)40 show that 1 handled more cases than I did in 1939 but in many of the cases in winch I imposed a fme or jai l so \ tence during the past vear , the Sen- tence was chosen. \ . ' The total amount paid to the town 5-?&Mt J^te' \ »« K' W « IH iM, i4b.75 , a drop m Vi* vciuu> in. SSi 'ffiAK 0 '\^^ ^. Expect Big Crowd Christian Youths ' Gathering Sunday Plans have now been completed for the largest Christian :Youth g ather- ing in the history of Suffolk county, to be held at the Center Moriches Presbyterian church -next Sunday af- ternoon at 3 o ' clock. The auspices are non-denominational.. It : is hoped every community in tlie county' will be re- presented at the 'roll ' call. Prof. Samuel L. Hamilton , popular professor of education at New York university, will give an address ' on \How to Live a Christian Life in the Present Day World , \ followed by n forum period- for. discussion. The Rev. S. Hall Barrett , Jr., pastor of the Center Moriches Presbyterian church , will lead the opening song serviec with Mrs. Gertrude Titmus at the or- gan. The' Pilgrim Fellowship groups , un- der direction of Miss Eleanor Hestor , of: tho Patchogue Congregational church ,; will . be in charge of the devo- tions , and a choral group of young; people, directed by Mrs. Helen Link , will sing- two selections entitled - 'Lo , y. oice to Heaven Sounding:, \ (Boriinian- sjcy, arr. by Tschaikowslci). and \ . \/Turn Thy Face From My Sins \ ( Sullivan), Miss Gladys Davis will accompany al; the organ and the voices will be com- bined from young people ' s choirs. The roll, call will he taken by dif- fe rent • villages; responding rath eu' thtttt , ;.difjJqi'oiTC ffroupjSj , ' oi v denomina 7 tionfe. ,Thla \ will- : he a i nVeciinKv^fti; everyone h' . onr 12' yoara. up;- , ,.. : .: . . , _* „¦ , • , ' >' ' : ' • '• ' \ ' . ' ¦ r - ¦ ' . . , . \ ''' , . ' , \ ' ' v , ' *¦• ' - . . ¦ ¦ ¦ , . ' ¦ ' '¦ , ' ' - . ' . • . ,, ' _ ¦ n -wv ' ' , ':.:i. !*¦<•• ' .. ,.' • ,.. ¦ -•• ' • ..,.i. ' i , ... .. . .. nv... \;.»¦-\.,.¦,. ' , < , JM ' \\? . ' ; Ace6rditig '\'t'6 liferent ' ' plans , \ H <$& fountains soon will he using ' a \nevy: apple squeezer -thai; will . periii i t. th«i) serving of fresh : apple/wjuuw ; , .; ' ,/, • 'X ¦: , ;v*- . ' , \ , U \ , \ > ' , ¦ ' ' • ' ¦ ' ' , ' ¦ ' ¦ ' •. ,r^i.:\' , \ ' - - - ' v •i:- ' ' » i,^ftv^. ' ,V :' . 1 ' | ii' ' '> f. . • ili . . ' ..:i!' • ¦ .f* . ' • ¦ ¦ , ,. .. - ¦ • . \ , ' :,. ' ,- . , ¦ .. ' , \ ' i ,, ¦ ,:. ' . ' . . . ¦r l ,;.!f' ' , !'» , .ii, ' .i. . 'i ,; | ..' , i. ' ). > 1 ¦ ¦ ¦¦' ¦ ' ¦ ' • - ¦ - ' ¦ ¦ ' ¦ '\ ¦ ¦ ¦ ' '¦ - --\¦¦ ' \ ¦ ' ¦ -i -i ¦ ¦ ¦ ' ¦ l .-i-. . .i.. ':^..-U--_- Opening Town Bond Bids Put Over Until January flic- opening of bids j n th( , «, _, _ . Brookhaven town ' s v, \Lt ' • S' fErtr vHSr year because of a W»l ,\ • cw . A total of $]07 9% in a L l0( i lmi ^ ity. «tolrl : OC fi, , n 00 llil« Will hp \ «oifl. , A Ot ihesn y bout s totalling to? ¦ 490) covoL'ing work ion !¦«, , ft W>2.r year, wiII ' b? ££ J u/In* ,;hc 1'^ the viin ^^ ori ' ng eonstmction Zli • ^ ul \ ' COV \ Brook Watar TstJJ iV h ?- StMl * January 8. The %n,«, n ,U , bo «°™ > m chwRoaU o VlnTtlS \^ bo T d » \ 'tritt. In each S! 1 » Watw'*^ the bond iBsib vluVSjJ? 806 *' '^ iiiadiiiiin \ ''' ¦ ' ¦ ' ' '^¦ ' - '¦ - ' . i' ¦ \ \ , ;. .. . \ ' ¦ : , - • •v;m; ,„ Registration of Aliens , New Law , At Patchogue Pdstoffice Is 1 , 456 The Patchogue postofflce made one of the largest showings in Suffolk county in respect to the number of persons registered under the 7 - Alien Registration act , according' ' to a re- port made by Postmaster Edgar M, Mapes over the week-end that a tof^i l of 1 , 45(1 aliens were handled in Pat- ehogua during the past four months, It was originally estimated that Pat- chognie ' s figure would he about 600, The deadline for registering under the nation-wide act was last Thurs- day ; at ' midnight; Throughout , \ thc four-month period , tlie Patchogue postofflce registered an average of about 13 a day, whereas on the final day, a total of 25 jiorsqhs reported there for 1 registering \ anjd ' fingerprint- ing. - Y { -. ' ; #. . ; i iM, >;t' r '' „ T)ie ontira^ wprkJri yvj Yed. by thp act was , liandlo(I. ' ,hy th 1 - ' rotoilar members oT thej ' . ' Ste . ff , $0.} th&asflistance of ' o , jjte' ., ' ¦ outside; : typist. Tno ¦ ' registering .^a ' »»-; :p.QipB<)h^li y;-i:' ' isup. OKVji iaQd by ' Mr. Mapes , ' w^th v; Suporint' orident of Mails Kairy , T. Weeks .i andr; Arthur M. < JRfapes ,. shariiirfi: , tho fingerprinting .worlq ' ;^i , : . iyy:y r yyy . v.j^' .i'V.ivv ' : ^ ^:' - :;^ ^/ ,v... . . . . \ . , • ' , , :. ' ' . : ¦ ,; , ; ;l'M , ,; ' ¦ . ' . ' ¦ ¦ ' ': ' ' I., i 'i - ^'^ V%Y-. i... ,f. w n. ^ A „ ,^l '.V Rfel< SS ' h-'', ' ., i ; V, jj|.^;IV iif' , ' ;?' i'j:-i '! ') ' ? ' v\^.^ i^ ^¥^:W' i[: I ' \ '11 \' I ' I \ 11 !! ' ' -¦ ¦ ' \ ; Illlllllliiiilllllll 11 I \ III ' Besides the work in the office , Mr. Mapes made , a total of ten calls at homes , where aliens , ill or otherwise hedriddeh , were unable to make the trip to the postoffiee, A total of 122 miles was covered in this way* - ¦ . • • •¦. Since August 27 , well over 4 , 0Qf\ , - r 000 non-citi x en s -were registered throughout the nation , as compared ¦v/.vth the preliminary calculations ' -of 3 , 600 , 000 \ ;. New York led tho 48 states with about 1 ,000 , 000 aliens, roister- ed , or r more than twice theviiumb&r reported' ' . from socon d -placo ' »,CtVli- fornia. , ,; ' y '^ ¦ ' ¦ . ¦[: ' : ;; ', ;>• .. ' « , ; The information ga ined ih r tli' e ' ali ' eh census , is- hold' confidential Mi y ' the federal government , ' „ th' o ' rof HH' \ ' no analysis of the local figures , ' ' parti- cularly in rospdet to ; the number . of th os e registered'' froni 'Pateliogue and vicinity or to nationalities iia avail- « bjp - . * . - / /;; • ¦:: , ' : , •; . ' . ' ' • v; '-N!( ; '' ' It is. reportQcl ,. libwever ,, that ; ' the 1 , 456 persons I'M'IsCered in Pafeh- ogiie wero largely trovnvoutsido seq- tjons and represenied ^ipire ' ' ¦ ¦ < than - 40 •villages slBxtehdiniR^r.omyE^teTO-;Sut- ^iMo ' .^^^Iksq W W§i$iMiM ¦ * •• ' Mope to Increase Tests Hiseove r Tuliere iilosis Expansion of Health Association ' s Program in Suffolk Coun- ty Depends Upon Returns from Christmas Seal Sale Plan for Tuberculin Tests for All Grade Pupils , in Addition to High School X-ray Photographs More intensified study in tuberculosis case-finding work in Suffolk county will be in- corporated into the 1941 pro- gram of the Suffolk Tuberc u- losis and Public Health associ- ation , provided sufficient funds are realized from this year ' s sale of Christmas seals , which is drawing near a close. During the past few month s , ab out 2 , 000 students in hi gh schools through - out the county have undergone x-ray examinations as part of the annual checkup to help eradicate symptoms of the disease. In addition to the x-ray work dur- ing the coming year , tuberculin tests will be made for school pupils of all ag-es in both grade and high schools. These tests , according to Dr. Eliza- beth C. Wells , association secretary, will ; bring to light those cases in which there has been infection but which manifest no clinical symptoms. C. H. Hawkins Estate Valued $68 , 010 Net According to schedules filed in the Surr ogate ' s court ^in Riverhead the late Charles H. Hawkins of Bellport leaves an estate appraised at $71 , - 987.13 gross and $68 , 010.55 net . It will pay a tax amounting to $456.90. The will disposes of the estate as f ollows : Adele Cox , Bellport , daugh- ter , dwelling and contents ; Clarence G. Hawkins , son , remainder of realty , including- a soft drink and stationery business and a garage business , to- gether with accounts receivable. , . Madeline Terrell , Patchogue , daugh- ter, is given $3 , 000 and all shares of stock in various corporation s that testator may have owned when he died ,, but excluding stock in the Bell- port National bank. Clarence G. Haw- kins , son , is also given $20 , 000 , and Adel e Cox is given the life income from a $10 , 000 trust fund , with prin- cipal to her issue when she dies. Each grandchild is given $1 , 000. They are Miriam V. Hawkins , aged about .. ten , Bellport; Stanley Cox , 14 , Bellport ; Katherih ' e Cox. nine , Bell- port; and Melvin Cox , ei ght , Bell port. The remainder- of the estate goes to the son. The recent duck season left a $300 reminder for Woolworth Donahue , member of the five-and-dime Wool- wor th , family, as the result of having -n nr. afoul of the law at the Donahue \ faTfrjly ' s ' hunting lodge in Calverton. Young Donahue , it was learned re- cently paid the $300 as a civil com- promise imposed by Justice of the Peace Charles A. Ludder , Jr., in Wes . thampton court , at the close . of the season. According- to court rec- ords , Donahue fed wild ducks at a private lak e on the Donahue estate for the shooting entertainment of himself ahd two South American guests. Stat e Conservation Inspector Everett Overton of Quogue and a Federal conservation inspector were the complainants . Feeding tine IBird^—and Shooting - J em Costl y MATHER AMBULANCE FUND APPROACHES $1 ,000 MARK The drive to raise $4 , 000 , with which to purchase a new ambulance for the Mather Memorial hospital in Port Jefferson , approached the $1 , 000- mark over the week-end , according . to-the Mather Ambulance fund , the committee .in charge of the cam- paign. A six-foot thermometer has been placed in front of the Brook- haven Town Police station on Arden place , Port Jefferson, and the prog- ress of the fund-raising effort is shown from clay to day. ' Leftover Twkey Disk The problem of how to serve a cup- fxil of cold turkey meat and add in- terest to it may be solved by the following recipe: Turkey Tetrazzini l . cup of white sauce , made with ri ch milk or cream . and seasoned with salt , pepper and celery salt. 1 cup of cooked turkey, cut in thin strips. y% cup of cooked spaghetti , cut in 3 /_ -inch pieces. h' z cup of mushroom caps , sliced arid , sauteed in butter. x k, cup of grated strong cheese, % cup of buttered cracker crumbs. Bring the white sauce to the boiling point and add the turkey, the spa- ghetti , and the sauteed mushrooms. Fill a buttered casserole dish , or in- dividual ramekins , with the mixture , sprinkle it with the grated cheese and cracker crumbs, and bake it in a hot oven (425 degrees Fahrenheit) until the crumbs are brown . This serves about six persons. It may be served on toast.

xml | txt