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Binghamton courier. (Binghamton, N.Y.) 1844-1849, July 09, 1845, Image 2

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•evaerw*. : r. t » e*- - T H E L A S T DAYS O F G E N E R A L JA C K S O N . [From the Nashville Union June 21.] I f th e e a r t h l y c a r e e r o f G e n Ja c k s o n had t e r ­ m in a ted w ith t h e ex p ir a tio n of his P r e s id e n tial service, h is fam e as a patriot, so ld ier an d states­ m a n w o u ld h a v e lived t h r o u g h a l l tim e . T h e r e w o u ld , h o w e v e r , h a v e been one defect in his c h a r a c t e r w h ic h th e friends o f C h r is tian ity m i g h t w e ll h a v e lam e n ted — o v e r all h is noble v i r t u e s l h e r e w o u ld h a v e been ab s e n t the c h a s ten in g anc* b e a u tify in g and san c tify in g influence of C h r i s t ia n piety. B u t no.v it is m a tier o f heait- fel: gratificatio n w ith every C h r is tian and patri ot to k n o w , t h a t w h ilst his n a m e w ill be a to w e t o f s t r e n g t h to th e lovers of lib e r ty th r o u g h ^ a ll fu tu r e tim e , it w ill also be a b r i g h t beacon lig h t b y w h ich th e t e a c h e r s o f C h r istia n ity can illu s ­ tra t e th e tru th o f t h e i r r e lig io n . If th e cau s e of p a tr io tism and lib e r ty triu m p h e d in his life, th e cau s e o f C h r i s t ia n it y triu m p h e d in his death. W h i l e o th e r s a r e en g a g e d in e u lo g iz in g the n o b l e deeds o f th e illu s tr io u s deceased as a sol­ d i e r and statesm a n , w e propose to finish oft th e p i c t u r e w ith th e le s s g l a i ing, but m o r e b e a u ­ tiful co lo r s o f those s ilent a n d unobtrusive C h r i s ­ tian v irtues w h ich gilded the ev e n in g of h is life F o r the details w h ich we a re about to record, * - e m b r a c in g th e last tw o w e e k s of th e eventful life of G e n . Ja c k s o n ,w e a r e indebted to th e k i n d ­ ness of his a flectionate son. w h o has\ fu r n ish e d th e m at o u r request.. ' O n the'S u b b a th\ day, ttvo w e e k s before hi& d e a th , th e r e w a s .a-co in m u n io n o f th e L o r d ’s S u p p e r in th e H e r m ita g e C h u r c h . .Gen. J a c k ­ son \to's u n u s u a l l y s e r i o u s . a n d .so l e m n - i n his feelings.dn-ring ih e m o r n in g , arid - r e g r e tted e x c e e d i n g l y 't h a t he vta’s u n a b le to ac c o m p a n y ' his fa m ily to t h e c h u r c h . H e requested h i s d a u g h ter, M rs. Jac k s o n , to b r i n g hom e w ith h e r ' .the Rev* M r. L a p s ley, a s he w a s a n x io u s .o n c e m o re to partake of the sacred- feas'u As they were - l e a v i n g for -the c h u r c h - h e took each, -m e m b e r -of ■the fam ily by fhe'hrand and-.invoked upon ihem . xtfl th e blessings ofGocJ. A f ter t h e i r rettim 'frum * : church', th e w h o le f a m ily , w ith ' th e R e v . , M r. • .L a p s le v .a n d D r; C u r r e y ,.assem b led in-his room . -— h e - w a s very;feeb!.e but.conversed . f r e e l y on - rel.igoiis topics—-h e w a s e a lm /ancl resig n e d , rind, •.said he.w a s jeady\ to go, w h e n e 'y p r h isf' D ivine. -M aster- th o u g h t, fit to e a l j h im — th a t', be& u flered \a g r e a t.d e a l of-bodily pain-, but .the.' Lo-rd’s w ill b e done. H e th e n pat took o f t h e H o l y Com ? nfiinTon— i t 'w a s a solem n - . s r e n e ,,;an d . rendered'. • s till.m o r e .s o ..b y - th e confidence w ith w h ic h he re f e r r e d to.-it as th e last tim e , h e ; sh o u ld enjoy the-b.uppy p r iv ileg e . ■ F ie spofce o f his-death as. iVear a t barlcf/but said t h a t d e a th had no-, ( e r r o r s . l b .r /h i m ,'c o i n h w’h ’en ‘he. .n iig h t. - ^ W h e n - 1 . h a v e suffered su f f ic ie n i f ^ i ’ said h>, “ the L o rd v y iifth e n t a k e m e to hinVself— b u tx v b a l are; -all m y s u fferings''com p a red.to those o f tiie ' blessed ■ S a -viour, w h o died oh th e accu r s e d tre e for m e .-•^nririe a r e ffothin.g,”' ; N n t 'a ‘hiun.nn'r' e v e r :e s :’; . c a p e d h i m —fh e sp'ei>t m u c h of- his tim e d u r i n g : th e la t t e r d a y s of his :m e in.Sec'ret p F a jei' : ; - . Q n ; l b e T h u r s d a y ev e u tn g - p revious i q J o i s •jdeath .he referred'.to.the blissed promisesrin the. .h y m n — f r o m w h i c h .h e . r e p e a l e d ; t ' - j- ‘‘When, throupli the. deep.vvit ers I call tKee:.td.go, ; . .T h e :Trvefs ^rwolshiflriot thee dvertfoW.y ■' - .;-H e - q u o ted m a n y passages, qf Scripture,- an d co n v e rsed feel in g I v u n o r i;Ih e holy- '.invitations' ' ** • * * ^ \ « . v •• J • j , • ^ t ” 'g i v e n b.j*;cfur;:$ a vi.o.ur'for a ll to com e' u n to - h im ; - I'^p^clbch' q fH h e ;sam e nig h t, h is doUgh-' T H E B I N G H A M T O N C O U B I E B . J . R # O R T O N , E d i t o r . WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 1845. G o t . M a r c y . - We notice with great pleasure the high tribute of respect which waa paid to thia distinguished gentle, man on his late visit to Albany, by citizens of that place, lung'his neighbors and associates and eminent­ ly qualified to judge of his worth. Originating with those who have known him intimately both in public and private relations, and are abls to judge of his merits as a public functionary and as a man, it is a compliment of the highest possible character. Governor Marcy has long occupied a conspicuous position before the people of this state and o( the na­ tion. Whether as our financial officer in tbe state government—*-a justice of the supreme court, Govern­ or and senator in congress; bis duties have ibeen promptly and ably discharged, and with an eye single to the general good. He possesses a strong head and honest heart,— is an excellent scholar and holds a pen of uncommon vigor. With these qualifications, \aided by a rich fund of common sense, he will fill, we venture to predict, the distinguished post he oc. cupies with marked ability, and give strength and character to the administration. Through a long and eventful life he has been a firm and unyielding dcm- .ocrat, and we congratulate our worthy President! and the people Upon this fortunate selection. W e'are aware, as wc pen this hasty article, lhat Gov. Mar. cy’s political orthodoxy has*.been questioned by some •who claim to have filed R specification, in the demo, cratic archives., entitling them to certain* exclusive rights. Bid, inasmuch as democracy was generally in' use. before their patent bears .date, wc have not t bought, jt an objeclioh lhat Governor M. did not agree with their model. - - C e l e b r a t i o n o f t i i e F o u r t h . TJie anniversary uf'our National Independence was celebrated on Friday'by ou.r citizens in a manner worthy ofthe occasion. In point of numberr and dis play, ft was probably superior to any thing this village -had ever w.itnesscd, • T h e day was ushered rn by 'th e firing o f cannon -and r Xh<$ \ ringing ot' b ells; and a grand national salute of thirteen guns a t sunrise. Sioo'n thereafter -our. citizens began to throng-'the streets, and to re­ ceive-additions frum abroad through every thorough fare leading into town. The new Bridge across the Chenango,'-consisting as yet merely of timbers,: and the. river-be;ng svvoleri and impassible from recent tain’s,.* had threatened a sad on the eve: riing previous ho mo pf .out spirited citizens congrega­ ted ajwl 'carried by hand and laid down -a plank -path­ way ovijr-.ihp-bridge, so :that .the- -people of the west side were enabled. lo-join .us. • ■ .- , 'Between ten and eleven, the procession was.fyrmcd. .b^-Col. Robie'--anil-his assistants in Court street','near yuiiAiyL-uc^itJU ^ ty u u jfu u a 1 i' ' i vvj.q . i s . W h e n t dppojt•'heneer t h n t'y d u \yj-irsend .;for' . • n r y okh-friends,-M .ljdr- L<jwis arid- Judge.- C a m p -' ’ b e l l i ^ u t - . r f e a T that J t i d 'g e X f i p b e l F ' is'ta'-fee* bl'e jto cbijrei^Tto 'm a k e Jttx-JT* gori for hiy funer'at*.- I w i s h to. h e .;bei iecl in- .it' - ' p i a i n 'u n ost ei>t a ri ou s -man tier\ w it h. o u t d isp la y o r - porn p.” H e th e n - r e s ted for th'e,‘n ig h t: - • T h e n e x t d a y fie Was ta k e n w ith rath e y an e.y; •cessive -ditrrfiea, and .said tn h is'so o , th a t 'if it w a s not ch e e k e d .it im tstjsoon - tak e him off; -.and yet, he s a id , ii .tvbuId be d a n g e r o u s to. ch e c k it, as it was nature finally giving .w a y to tiie- dis­ ease. ■ D u r i n g ihe\da-v he'coiiv'ersed g e n e r a lly ' . 3,, v ’ t . ■ C v ab o u t his farm -arid ‘ b u s i n e s s ; . a n d talk e d m u c h o f his beloved c o u n t r y of th e ceyraintv. he. leh as to t h e an o e x a tio n of T e x a s , o f th e letters he had ju s t received b o rn o u r m in ister t o T e x a s ,’ o f 't h e stand tak e n by his old, e a r l y -friend a n d -com ­ p a n io n in arm s , G e n . S a m . H o u s to n , on th e s u b ­ je c t — a l l o t w h ich convinced him th a t “all is safe.” H e sp o k e also of o u r O r e g o n difficulty, a n d doubted not t h a t th e p resen t ad m in istratio n w o u ld do its d u ty to th e c o u n t r y — e x p r e s s in g th e m o s t a b id in g confidence in P r e s id e n t P o l k — b u t h o p ing and p r a y in g th a t th'e difficulty w o u ld be am icab ly a r r a n g e d betw e e n th e tw o g o v e r n ­ m e n ts; but ifnot, s a id he, “ L e t w a r c o m e — th e r e w ill be patriots e n o u g h in th e land to rep e l for­ eig n ag g r e s s io n , com e from w h e n c e it m a y , to m a in tain s a c r e d ly o u r j u s t rig h ts, and to p e r p e t­ u a te o u r g lo r io u s C o n s titution and liberty, a n d to p r e s e r v e o u r h a p p y U n i o n .” In th e ev e n in g o f th e sam e d a y his.m ind w as so m u c k en g r o s s e d w ith o u r foreign affairs, that he determined to unbosom him«elf in a letter to h i s faithful friend, P r e s i d e n t P o l k — h e w rote to him a lo n g letter in relation to o u r foreign re Jations— it w a s th e last Inttpr he ev e r w ro te— and b reathed a d e g r e e o f affection for th e Presi­ d e n t and confidence in his w isdom , w h ich w ill m a k e it an in v a lu a b le m e m e n to- O n th e next d a y h e franked a letter to th e ’H o n . T h o m a s F . M a r s h a l l o f K e n t u c k y , w h ich w a s th e last tim e he signed his nam e . D u r i n g th e e a r ly part o f th is d a y , S a tu r d a y , h e felt c o m fortable until he w a s tak e n w ith a cold clam m y p e r s p ir a tio n — he re g a r d e d this as a n o t h e r indication th a t th e hand o f d e a th w a s u p ­ on him , but he received th e su m m o n s w ith re s ­ ig n a tio n and com p o s u re. H e conversed less th a n h e had done on th e day preceding, but th e r e w a s th e s a m e pious r e s ig n a tio n r u n n i n g t h r o u g h h is r e m a r k s w h ich had ch a r a c terized al l h is c o n ­ v e r s a tion for m a n y days. L a te in th e evpning D r . E s s e lr n a n arriv e d and tried, ineffectually, 10 c h e c k th e diarrhoea. E a r l y on th e next m o r n in g , S u n d a y , M r . E s - ••im a n w a s c a lled into his room , and in a sh o rt tim e th e G e n e r a l f iin ted a w a y , and it w a s su p ­ posed at th e m o m e n t th a t he w a s dead — but he revived im m e d m ’ely. and called all his little g r a n d ch ild r e n , w ith th e other members of tfie fa m ily , aro u n d him — h e took his g r a n d ch ib d r e n by th e hand, blessed and kissed th e m tpn d o r ly , told them that they had good parents, that th e y m u s t be obedient ch ild r e n , k e e p holy the S a b b a th d a y , and read the N e w T e s tam e n t. __ H i s ey e -sig h t by this tim e becom e d im m e d — his son to o k him by the hand and s a i d : “ F a t h e r . b o w do y o u feel— do you k n o .v n ie ? ” “ K n o w 5 y o u ? Y e s — I w o u ld k n o w you all if I could see— b r i n g m y spectacles.” H e put them on and sa i d : “ W h e r e is m v d a u g h t e r and M a rian — G o d w ill tik e c a r e o f y o u for m e — I am m y G o d ’s— I b e lo n g to h im — I go but a sh o r t tim e before you. and I w a n t to meet you a l l , w h ite and b lack , in H e a v e n .” .H e th ^ n sa id : “ W h a t is th e m a tter w ith m y d e a r c h il J r e n — have I a l a r ­ m e d y o u ! O h ! do not c r y — b e good c h ild r e n and we w ill all m e e t in H e a v e n .” H e then died aw a y , and expired c a im lv and q u ie tly , a t 6 o’clo c k , P. M ., on th e 8th of J u n e , 1845, W e h a v e heretofore given an acco u n t of his b u r i a l — w e h a v e now only to add th a t th e fol- lo w i o g w i l l h R the ppi-aph on his to m b s t o n e : A N D R J E W J A C K S O N , B o m an the I5t7i o f March, 1767, D IED ON THE'Btk OF JUNE, 1845. race—May their spirit e f ariUrpriN—their hatred of tyranny, and their unbending integrity, ever be fun. damental ingredients in our national character. 9. Freedom of opinion—our glorious birthright— Palsied be the arm, and forever ailent the tongue, that would interfere with its exercise. 10. The Empire State —-tier appropriate iriotto “ Excelsior”—the strongest bulwark sgainsl tyranny, her System of Common Schools. 11. Agriculture, Coinmerce and the Arte—mutual helpers in the great work of -elevating the condition of Man. 12. The Ballot Box—Freedom’s favorite instru. ment, the tyrants dread. “ I t is weapon firmer set And better than the bayonet One whose power cornea down as atill * As snow-flakes fall upon the sod, Yet executes the freeman’s will As lightning does the will of God!” J3. W oman. Freedom’s sons alone appreciate her worth, and give her a true place in the scale of so­ cial life. N . Y , a n d E r i e R a i l r o a d . ' Eieazer .Lord Esq., President of the N. Y. and Erie Railroad Company, we perceive, has published a ear.d in the Journal-of Commerce, tendering his resignation as President of said company, and also as director, “ to be accepted and'take effect as soon as b'mafide subscriptions tothe capital stock amounting to $3,000,000, shall have been obtained, .and repor; ted and accepted by the Board.” M.r. L. makes this, offer, says the Journal, in consequence of a somewhat prevalent sentiment that his holding the above office prevents the taking of the stock. Thi* “ sentiment” we.aro-free to say, ia a prevalent one in this quarter as well as elsewhere ; and the course of'Mr.' Lord would have squarod muck nearer with our notions of propriety, had he some time since resigned his placo unequivocally,-instead of condi. tionally, a t this late hour. Companies,' with; new. and tasteful, uniforms ; antf, their- .engines, cleat) and'polialied'j and dccorated iv itii' • wfeaihs of .flower*; -Ioqkig'g more •lik'e. ornaments for tk'c; parlor,' than machines wjttr. -which-to battle Hie, .in-thfe eonfusiqn-of night-.and .phouts'aod. flames,— Tbe-fFir©‘Department 'was' led-by T.# R.' Morgan, .ChiefJEngineer, a'n'dltsritli.ef officers.', • N ext foljpwed- thc Revolutions)ry'sofdlers,a m ere’remnant bf .othor days tfnd. oilier scenes, a few*-old men; tottering.as ■ they .walked ;. but .with - souls .withip: tp.cnr, jUtei the jewrir in a bmken'cafeKct.rbriliiant/aiid.unfading,'full, \of the light andvspirit .oC ’76,-.' -After tlieih'came the officers oi the-*-Day, the \President Vice' 'President's, DraloT;-Readei;xrid 'Committee*of Arrangements— tlie'Dfficers of ouc Village,' the Clergy, and citizens- afrd-sfranger's;-'’ ; ■ . ' '• ; ',. ’ • ’. • T.lic- procession; 'marched to .the \poiin'd of m.artial hniisic, w iiile giins were hobjriirig,. beljs jiealin g ;, ..an’d fla.gs.waving,-up/Wasliiiiglon and Henry-and. down. Chenango streets to (lie Presbyterian Church: : That edifice, recently -greatly enlarged, was already more th a n h a l f filled w jlli-lad ics, w h ile an. im m e n s e th r o n g of gentlemen were waiting without ;• and when it was c r a m m e d to . i t g moiost capacity, >hps gallery and isles, th e r e 's t i l l re m a i n e d w i t h o u t of th o s e w h o fo u n d it impossible, to obtain a foothold within, as we are in f o r m e d ,.se v e r a l h u n d r e d p e r s o n s . * The-exercises in the church were all bf a high -• . j ® character.\ The Chaplain, Rev. D. D. Gregory Com­ menced the services wilh an-impressive and appropri- ate prayer, and officiated.throughout with great dig­ nity. Tho music,' instrumental and vocal, arranged for the occasion and conducted, by Wm.- B. Double­ day and F. S. Slosson, was such as to do honor to those well known teachers'of the divine art. TJie Declaration w-atf read by John Clapp, Esq. with unu­ sual clearness and effect. No word.was lost from a rapid pronunciation, or sentiment impaired fromi .an inappropriate emphasis. The Oral ion, by the Hon. D. S. Dickinson, occu­ pied about an hour in the delivery. A s w a s antici­ pated, it was a production o f a high order, and though on a hackneyed subject, struck out into novel fields. W e cannot undertake, nor have we space, to furnish ev e n a -synopsis o f i t ; b u t tr u s t i t m a y be g iv e n to a m o r e e n d u r i n g fa m e th r o u g h th e p r e s s . VVe m u s t recur however to one point, the speaker’s opinion as to the manner in which the Day should be kept — -H e r e M r . D . c o n d e m n e d m o d e r n in n o v a t io n , in t u r n in g th e D a y to a ll u s e s , to s e c t a r i a n celeb r a tio n s ,, to the meetings and business of benevolent associations, <&c.— a n d ae s u r n e d the position, lhat.the Great Day of the Nation-, the recurrence of our Country’s Birth D a y , o u g h t t o be h e ld sa c r e d to one purpose alone— th a t th e c e l e b r a t i o n o f a n y t h i n g a n d e v e r y th i n g else on the Fourth of July, is just as inappropriate, as would bo the commemoration of Washington’s birth, day by a celebration of the Victory at N. Orleans. From the Church, the procession moved to the spa. cious bower erected in tbe Court House yard, where several hundred gentlemen and ladies partook of a bountiful dinner, prepared by Mr. L. Harvey. The toasts, (which will be found below) were drank in na. lure’s noble beverage, with appropriate guns fe cheers. In tiie evening, the fire works, under the direction of Col- Robie, were matters of great attraction. The stationary pieces were got up with great skill and to u n i v e r s a l s a t i s f a c t i o n ; w h ile th e fly i n g s e r p e n t s h i s ­ se d , a n d th e ro c k e t s a s c e n d e d in a s t r e a m o f g l o r y , and dying, shed a flood of golden tears, which de scended in slow and solemn beauty to the earth. The Balloon performed well— and tbe torch-light procica- sion o f o u r n o b le F i r e m e n w a s b e a u t i f u l b e y o n d c o m ­ pare. AH th e s e fe s tiv i ti e s a n d w o n d r o u s s i g h t s , to o k th e d a y fa r i n t o t h e n i g h t : and th u s ended th e Fourth. The day was delightful, the ingathering of people great beyond expectation, order prevailed, every coun­ tenance seemed happy and delighted, and the festiv ities closed without accident. M i s s i o n a r y C o n v e n t i o n , June filth and 2$fA.- - The friends of the. A.. B. C. F. M. met a t Bingham­ ton according to previous-notice oh the 27th June at 1.1-2 o’clock P. M. in the Presbyterian Church.— The convention was called to order by Rev-. D. D. Gregory and proceeded io the selection of the follow, ing officers, viz: E-Hawley, Preid’t;'W m . Platt, Win. Soymotir. and Wm. Wipner,.D. D., V. Presdl’s; Rev'. H. W. Gilbert, and Rev. H. J. Gaylord, Secy’s: Rev. F. E. Ctrnnon, Rev.'S. W. Brace, Rev. D.'D.. Gregory, H. Collier, O. Ely', S. West, business Com- mitt.ee. •• - The delegation in attendance from the Ain. Board consisted of Rev. W m. Armstrong, D< D. one of. the. •Secretaries, New.York, Rev. J. Scudder, IVI. D. re* turned missionary from.- Madras, J. P. -Thompson; pastor of Broadway Tabernacle N.'.Y., Rey.'F. E.. •Cannon, agent of the board, Genera N'. Y ' f - * .-The ministers present,-and thd cburpb^s repfesea- ted. it: the: converitfon'were'air follows': ' - - - - ’ ■! : • ■ 'Rev.' D. D. Gregory, Presbyterian cli.‘,'Bjnghaniton. S.' W,‘ Brace, Congregational cb.,;. . ■-“ / M r. Darby, Baptist ch‘.» - - . • . ; Barker, Epii.-MethhdUt oh-,. ' ■*' • “ “J Slocum, Qhondaga Presbytery. ■’ . “ .. Mr. Shiprrian, Agent of Am. Bible Rociefy. Wth/WiHjier. D ..D , Presbyterian ch., Ithaca.. - - -Presbyterian church Ovtcgo.\ . . . “ - Mr,. Riloy, Presbyterian church,. Nfpptrosp.; VMr.-Hydc, ^ “ ' \ ’S . Gibson, Pa.\ • *‘* J R.'MeOreary, “ ■ .; . .;G...Bond, Pa. • ; -VV-m^ T.-Doublcday, C<wg„. ch.,-B.a'inbridge. - . ■** C;. Wright, . .. “ ‘i.'CoyentryviHe. - .-it. iyiKLtronard.’Pr'esbyteriatr Mr: .Woodruff^ Cong. ' ' Mr. Ford,- *, . '• . “ Mr. Lewis, ' Trcsbytertan -'Mr. Biakeaty. II. 4i .'.“* Peter Lockwood,' “ “ .H. J. -Ga.ylordi. ‘ “ \ *« . REGULAR TOASTS. 1. The Day we celebrate— the noblest in the civil cycle of the year—Increasing honors shall cluster round it through the lapse of ages. 2. Our glorious Union—Cemented with the blood of oor Fathers—Truth and justice will make it eter­ nal, and like the Sun in the midst of ihe Nations. 3. l h e President and Vice President of the United States. 4. The Governor and Lieut. Governor of the State of New-York. 5. The memory of W ashington-the Father of our Country. 6 . T h e Patriots of tho Revolution. D eath ha. sadly thinned their ranks, but their principles live, and arc destined to redeem an enslaved Wyrld. 7. The memory of Andrew Jackson. 8 . Our Pilgrim Fathers—the progenitors of a noble CastierCreek. Cite.. .Fork’s. ’ Ncwark. .* Jjitler; : ; ' Maine Village, Berkshire. * Union.: . *. *.*. H. W. Gilbert, • “ “ Wjpdsor. Three successive meetings for prayer preceded- the'convention, in w h ich breihrcn from abroad took part : which had' a happy tendency to prepare the minds lif God’-s servants fur the examination oi the* missionary work. - - * . • . - The business committee presented a-scries of reso­ lutions whicli ‘embraced the -foll'owing sentiments, viz : • . .. .-That in the missionary Ivork Christ is our exam., pie: and it is our duty to engage rn this work,' in spirit, in. self denial and consecration as Christ did. That as the -preaching of the gospel rs the leading instrumentality in the hand of God for the world’s conversion, it becomes our duly to sustain the living preacher abroad. That the distribution of the Scriptures, and reli­ gious tracts are indispensible auxiliaries, which we are bound to sustain. T h a t tho increased facilities for carrying forward the m issionary w o rk, increase our obligation. That the missionary work in the foreign field is greatly in advance of the work at home. T h e doty of sustaining the monthly concert was presented: and the distribution of tho Herald and Day Spring was urged, as being valuable assistants in carrying on lhe enterprise. These positions were unfolded and pressed upon the conscience with great clearness and Dungency by M csars* A rm strong, Wisner, T h o m p son, C a n n o n Scuddcr, Riley and Slocum. O u r responsibility'as individuals, rather than aa churches, was strongly presented; a new and an entire consecration of al we have to J e s u s C h rist was urged } and our duty to do, not w h a t is convenient, or according to w h a t o th era arc doing; but to do all toe can lo aave a perish ing world was enforced with an unction and a persua­ siveness that deeply affected the large audience. It was evident, especially on the 2 d day of the conven tion, lhat God heard the prayers of his people, for the Spirit was manifestly poured out upon speakers anc hearers. Conviction for past neglect, spread lhrougl the whole assembly, many were overwhelmed in tears in view of the claims of Christ and the wants of the dying heathen, and Christians who had thought they had done something to extend the gospel, now felt that they had never opened their eyes to the con dilion of the heathen : that they had never felt, or prayed as they should ; and that they had never made any sacrifices to give them (he gospel. After the convention closed, Dr. Scuddcr addressee the children from the different churches in the village on the spiritual condition of In d ia w h e re he had long labored as a missionary, urging his hearers, with great simplicity and earnestness to learn the wants of the heathen, to pray for them, and to prepare to go and teach them the way of salvation through Jesus Christ. I f f i p o r t a i i t f r o f f l M e x i e d a n d T e r n Passage of the Annexation Resolutions by the Texian Congress— Treaty with Mexico rejected—Revolution in Mexico'— Chances of a war. T h e W a s h in g to n U n io n o f J u l y 3cl a n n o u n ­ ces th e a r r i v a l o f t h e U . S . S te a m e r P r in c e to n from G a lv e s to n , in n in e d a y s , w ith despatches and inform a tion. T h e T e x i a n C o n g r e s s h a v e u n a n im o u s ly acceded to th e term s of a n n e x a tio n as proposed by th e U n ited Slates, and rejected th e M e x ican T r e a t y . T h e C o n v e n tion o f D e ­ puties w a s lo assem b le on t h e 4th J u l y to ta k e th e final action \on an n e x a tio n an d to fra m e a state C o n s titution. C a p ’ain W a g g a m a n ' had a r r iv e d a t W a s h in g t o n , T e x a s , to s e lect posts to be occupied by th e U . S . T r o o p s , .and }o provide for t h e i r s u b s is tence. A resolution w a s in tr o d u ­ ced in C o n g r e s s re q u irin g th e E x e c u tio n to s u r ­ ren d e r all ports, n a v y y a r d s , b a r r a c k s , & c ., to th e p r o p e r a u th o r ities o f th e U . States. T h e P r e s id e n t pledges h im s e lf i n ’his m e s s a g e to give full a n d im m e d iate effect to th e w ill of C o n g r e s s so f a r a s depends on h i i n ,s e t h a t a s th e deputies a r e alm o s t to a m a n in. favor o f an n e x a tio n , ih e question nm y be c o n s idered settled, and w ithin th e n e x t few w e e k s T e x a s w ill tak e h e r place a s one o f th e States of th is U n io n . F r o m M e x ico w e h a v e acco u n ts of a n o th e r revolution attem p ted. It seem s th a t a p a r t o f th e tro o p s a t th e C a p i i a l , headed by G e n . R e n - g lo n raised t h e c r y o f F e d e r a t i o n , and took pos­ session of t h e palace, th e P r e s id e n t and th r e e of his m in isters. T h e rest of th e troops h o w e v e r , p r o v in g faithful, a s h o r t s t r u g g l e e n s u e d in w h ich •from -forty to fifty w e r e ’k illed , w h e n th e in s u r ­ g e n ts w e re put do'wQ an d q u iet restored. W i t h respect t o a w a r w ilh th is c o u n tr y on acco u n t o f an n e x a tio n , opinions a r e v e r y diverse. A let te r Iron. V e r a C r u z e f J u n e I I , published ip lh e . ,,.hc reJeem P i c a y u n e , s a y s t h a t in case o f a n n e x a tio n , M e x - o b l i g a t io n s ; its.capital, I believe, is £ 1 0 0 000, ico w ill c e r t a i n l y d e c la r e w a r: T h i s th e gov- and hy th e co n f lag r a tio n of th e 2 8 i h ult., it lost e m i n e n t w ill be o b lig e d to do. o r g o d o w n , in or-1 £ 5 0 , 0 0 0 new village where the prison is located,) new buildings are being e reeled, an d e very thing bears the aspect of “a contrnted' and wel.1 regulated, com m unity”— [Pittsburgh Republican. \V e a r e pleased t o {earn t h a t a .freJ of^ fine san d h a s j u s t been disco v e r e d w ithin t h e pickets of th e C lin to n prison. It is s a id th a l th is will- be a sa v in g to t h e S a t e o f s o m e th o u s a n d s b f d o l ­ la r s ; as n o n e o f a p r o p e r q u a lity for brick , w o r k w a s -to be had w ithin 3 m iles o f th e prison. ANOTHER THIRD OP QUEBEC DES­ T R O Y E D B Y F IR E . M o n t r e a l G a z e t t e O f f i c e ) T u e s d a y noon, J u l y 1, 1845. $ T h e steam e r Q u e e n , w h ich a r r i v e d sh o r tly before eleven this m o r n in g , h a s b r o u g h t us th e painful in tellig e n c e pf a n o th e r d isastro u s fire at Q u e b e c , a p p r o a c h i n g in magnitude and value of p r o p e r ty destroyed, t o t h e c a la m ity w h ich has so recen tly called forth o u r sy m p a th y . T h e E x t r a , w h ich w e issue th is morning, contains the m o st c o p ious details o f this melancholy event w e h a v e been a b l e to p ro c u re. Correspondence of the Montreal Gazette. Q u e u e c , 3 0 th Ju n e ,- 1 8 4 5 . - It pleased th e A l m i g h t y in his w isdom , to de­ vastate o u r city on th e 2 8 ih o f last m o n th, and it has a g a in see.med fit to Him to visit us w ith a sco u r g e . O n S a tu r d a y ev e n in g last, a b o u t elev ­ en o 'c lo c k , a lire b r o k e out i n t h e b a c k prem ises of M . T e s s ie r , N o t a r y , ‘St. J o h n ’s s u b e r b s . w h ich spread w ith u n r e le n tin g fury until n in e th e next m o r n in g , and w h ich in its co u r s e consum e d a- b o u t 1300 d w e llin g s , an d , a t t h e least, rendered hom e less 6 0 0 0 persons ! T h i s in addition to th e last fire, b e it u n d e rstood. H u m a n aid w a s o f no avail. W a t e r could not be a t t a i n e d to a- n y extent,\ a n d even w h e n had w a s o f little a v a il o w i n g to th e rapid p r o g r e s s o f th e destructive elem e n t. A b o u t th i r t y streets a r e n o w in ruins, from this fire-alone. T h e follow ing is th e a m o u n t o f in s u r a n c e s ef­ fected : — C a n a d a - office £ 4 0 .0 0 0 . Q u e b e c do. £ 1 2 ,- 000. M o n tr e a l do. £ 3 ,5 0 0 . P h a e n ix do. £ 1 , 075. d e r to sa'isfy th e ig n o r a n t populace, w h o cannot see a n d c a r e n o th in g for c o n s e q u e n c e s . In th is opinion G o v . S h a n n o n coincides. Ithaca it becoming.!.fam o u s place for Roor­ backs. We had in the hands of a compositor an ac. CQurit of a shocking accident which occurred there on the 4th,fro.m the bursting of a Cannon, by .which Gen. Boyd, Prof. Qnimby, and J. Nix Esq: were said to hays been killed.; when the following contradiction reached b s ; . . . T h e flam e s s p read, as durinsr th e last fire, from street l.o s treet, by the b u r n i n g flukes* s c a t tered by th e g a l e then b l o w i n g ; for, as on the 28th, th e r e had been a prievious co n tin u a n c e of d r y w e a ther, and, tim e o f l h e outbreak of th e fire th e r e raged a .violent N o r t h E a s t w ind. . T h e scene o f d a n g e r w a s^one-lruly fearful, a? on the 2 8 ih , apathy prevailed, not from a want of the fee fin g which compels .exertion, but from a m e n tal paralysis.. F o r t u n a t e l y , th e h o u r d a s s'Qiirew.hat propitious T h e metij husbands and brothers - were on the spot? being mostly in S H A M E F U L O U T R A G E . T h e -A lbany: fevehing Jo u r n a l, of Saturday, I bed.. andAfg.ua o f M onday contain accounts-of the- - T h e -loss of life, h a s’ not, On this occasion, bursting.of a cannon iu this, village on the the [.thanks be to God. been very great. -One- man 4th inst.,acco«T\panied with the loss ofthVee lives was killed by tr.e blasting of.a house, by his E x tr a s to that-effect w e re received h v 'each -of .'oi\;n im p rudence. - T w o o 'h e rs have-been red'u en c e an d in c o r p o r a te itself vrjih th e . U n i t S tates— I f l h a t be r e a l l y t h e desire, th e inteotioai of t h e T e x a t i peo p le— w e h a v e n o th in g to aay>—- n o t h i n g t o ffo a g a in s t it. If th e . T e x a n people, on th e co n t r a r y , w ish to p r e s e r v e th e i r io4a«. p e n d e n c y not o n l y w e h a v e no m o tive to opjposo it/b u t I do not hesitate to s a y t h a t F r a n c e m u s t ap p r o v e t h a t conduct, and consider th a t * T e x a s is rig fit.,r . * F r i g h ’ t f u l A t r o c i t i e s i n S y r i a . — T h e fo llo w in g d e tails h a v e co m e to hand th r o u g li a p r iv a te letter, o f th e b u t c h e r i n g s th a t h a v e re-* ce n tly tak e n p lace in S y r i a : “ A civil w a r, a n d one o f e x term in a tio n , r e ig n s at th is.m o m c n t in th e m o u n tain betw e e n t h e D r u ­ ses and th e C h r istia n s , a n d d u r i n g t h e Irifst fifteen d a y s th e h o r r o r s w e h a v e se e n p e r p e tr a ted a- round u s a r e d readful. O n e v e r y side th e sounds o f b a ttle a r e h e a r d , and n o t h i n g is seen but fire a n d f l a i n e ! houses, v illag e s , n n d c h u r c h . es, and con v e n ts h e in g re c ip r o c a lly a p rey t o t h e flair.e?. A t the moment I write. (M ay 17) w # h a v e before us th e a p p a ll i n g spectacle of n o less th a n elev e n villages, an d a n u m b e r of M a r o n ita c h u r c h e s an d convpnts in flam e s, an d , w h a t ia w o rse, w h e n th e C h r i s t i a n s a r e . v ictorious, t h e y en ter th e D r u s e v illag e s , p u ttin g to th e e d g e o f th e s w o rd , m e n , w o m e n an d c h i l d r e n ; th e D r u ­ ses f o llo w in g the. e x a m p le w h e n th e y a r e victo­ rious. A l l th e s i l k w o rm s of both parties, th o sole su p p o r t o f l h e S y r i a n population, h a v e been burned. A b n e r P a r k e A c q u i t t e d .— T h e j.u r y m e n in th e tedious tria l of \b . i e r P a r k e , at Belvide.ro, N e w Je r s e y , passed t h r o u g h o u r v illa g e on t h e i r retu r n hom e , on S u n d a y afternoon. T h e ver* diet w a s “ riot g u i l ty .” T h e c h a r g e o f t h e J u d g e w a s concluded on S a tu r d a y . T h e j u r y w a M tut ten h o u r s before they could ag r e e . W e supposo that th e p r iso n e r w a s d isch a r g e d , as h e h a s now stood tw o tria l s .— [ S o m e r v ille M e s s e n g e r . ' A t a recen t tow n -m e e ting, in N e w b u r y p o r t, a f u n n y old citizen aro s e a n d m a d e the f o llo w in g re m a r k s to u c h in g th e d o g law . “ M r. s p e a k e r , I a m ’opposed to a ll s u c h oppressive e d icts. O u e S h y lock-hath said— \Y o u take my house, when you take the prop T h a t doth sustain my house; you take my life, Wben you take the means whereby I live.” I h a v e but little k is tru e , but I w a n t t h a t little g u a r d e d , w h ich m y d o g does faithfully. W h e n business is d u l l — m o n e y scarce, an d w o o d h ig h — I h a v e to k e e p m y c h ild r e n a bed to p r e v e n t th e i r f r e e z in g — th e dog la vs a t th e foot,and keeps th e i r little feet a s w a r m as a p u g ! A n d o n e d a y last w e e k , B o s e c a m e h o m e w ith a g o o d tin- k itch e n tied to his tail— w h ich w o w e r e very th a n k f u l for— a s o u r s w e r e m o i l w o r n o u t : — an d w h o k n o w s b u t t b e n e x t tim e , b e w ill b r i n g th e s p it an d s k e w e r s — p e r h a p s a loin o f v e a l !” u f i h e ’kipcl .spoken of We' -ascertain on in q u iry w.ould blot Q u e b e c .f r o m the Jist of ci'ies. w e fe m a iled a t 'J b e post, office in - t h i s ' v illa g e ,. • M e e tings .w e fe h u ld ypsterday and to day, and a t any. 'if m e 'd u j i n g ' t h e past w e e k .. A n y ’ arid th is n ig h t a de p u t a! ion, co n s is tin g o f t h e ed ito r - h a v in g received-one of t h e . extras, vylll ‘I L q r d B i s h o p of M o n treal, M o n s e ig n e u r de Sid- con fer a g r e a t favor on us; by p r e s e r v in g , and -ym e, and the H o tiBles. G . P e m b e r to n , L. M a s . forw a rd i n g i t t o ’us, th a t w e -m a j ' .obtain so m e sau,’A . W . C o c h r a n e , w ith th e city and county clu e t o 't h e a u f h o r a n d prep.erator o f t h i s ou trag e . M e m b e rs, proceed to M o n treal to w a it upon H is ^ - [ I t h a c a Jo u r n a l; J u l y 9 t h . - ’ I E x c e l le n c y ih e G o v e r n o r G e n e r a l on ihis sub- =?=±: . ’ . ject. - _ , - . C o rrespondence q ( tfie Journal of Com m erce.- ’ 1 . B r e a f f (VOS yC S lerdny d i s t r i b u t e d ’ lO nljOUt ; W a s h i n g t o n , J u n e 16. ' 120.00“.persons w h o s e o n ly refoge w a s th e high-- It i s ’one'e m o rn officially d e n ied-that ih e O re-’ W - T h i s day upwards of lh a t number have go n 'n e g o tiatio n , is^\to be tran s f e rred to L o n d o n received s i m i l a r relief. ■ . - - - ; T h e r e h a s ’n e v e r e x i s ’ed a reason f o r s u p p o s in g -- I ppts» g r a n te d by th e .m ilitary, w e r e ’ p u t up ihsit'the-negotiation w o u ld b e t a k e n put- o f th e ” ^asl n ig h t on trie P la in s , for the-reception o f t h e han d s ol those-w b o a r e now co n d u c tin g it. T o vYa n d e r e rs. resortidI theteto: send a special m ission to. L o n d o n , c h a r g e d w ith V e i y m a n y of th e sufferers by th e first fire arr a d justm e n t o f t h e bo u n d a r y upon term s <vhich’ 'v e r e a s e c o n d tim e b u r n t out. .T h e houses of o u r g o v e r n m e n t m ight p r o p o s e ,a s a n ultim a tum '^ e hiost respectable fam ilies w ithin the w a lls vould not b.e a p rudent o r peaceful • m e a s u re.-— j art? ° P ^ n to th e refugees, and som e fiaye rrcciv-* ed. a d d itional inm a tes to th e p u m b e r of fifty !— M u c h m isery m u s t insue. a n d I fear,\ d isease a l ­ so. A l l th a t h u m a n 'p o w e r arid w ise su g g e s ­ tions can effect, W ill be effected, but rill must prove inadequate. I can safely say that not a fam ily in Q u e b e c , has escaped a shareof.these two dire calamities.. If i i j . i i l r d . j i m ight p ro v o k e a : w a r : M r. M c L m e ’s ap p o intm e n t is. how e v e r, g e n ­ e r a l l y considered as a 't o k e n o f th e pacific dispo;- sitiou of th is g o v e r n m e n t, and a p ledge th a t no ra s h - o r im p ru d e n t s tep w ill be tak e n by it. W o r k i n g o f 7 h e N e w P o s t a g e S y s tem — T h e n e w sch e m e of postage w h ich went into I L a b o r , p r io r to this, w a s sca'rce e n o u g h ; o u r operation on T u e s d a y , h a s w o rked w e ll at least port is crow d e d w ith sh i p s ; lim b e r at rives but as fur a s A lb a n y is concerned. T h e number o f slo w l y ; and the mercantile community, in its letters pul the first day in our post office nnd for- own operations, was much embarrassed, from warded, amounted to E ig h teen H u n d r e d On 'he causes cited; but what w ill be the case lhe second day the number was about Fourteen now ? Hundred. Making thiny-two hundred in all. Lend your aid to enlist further sympathy in T h i s is a b o u t three tim es the num b e r despatch- our behalf, arid above all things, let w h a t is to ed before the new law went into o p e ration be done, be done prom p tly. Thenum b e r (nailed the first day in Rochester I shall keep you advised of particulars astbev was n in e h u n d r e d and eighty-four, and in New’- com e to m y kno w led g e . Y o rk fiveiiines more than under ihe old law.— [A rgus. 246 1 p a s s e n g e r s a r r iv e d a t N e w - Y o r k o n M o n d a y , from fo r e ig n po ts. • T H E C O U R I E R . F R E S H i n d u c e m e n t s : The new postage law will take effect on the firat of July next: and after that time, this paper will be sent in the mails to subscribers living within thirty miles of Binghamton, free of postage. - This of itself will be a strong inducement to our country friends to lake the Courier: and grateful for our rapidly increasing patronage, and the favor with which o u r h o n e s t e f f o r ts lo fu r n ish the b e s t family newspaper in the interior, are viewed by the public.' we have still another one lo offer, T h e C o u r i e r w ill h e r e a f t e r be fu r n ish e d through th e m a i ls, in p a c k a g e s o f t e n or m o r e , a t one dollar and f if t y cents per annum, wherelhc money is p a id in advance. T h i s , w ilh th e free p o s t a g e , it will be se e n , re d u c e s th e e x p e n s e o f ^ihe p a p e r n e a r l y one half-:—o r s o m e t h i n g m o r e th a n o n e d o l l a r a y e a r . (Hr* In order lo avail ourselves of the earliest mails, and make sure' of supplying our subscribers in every part of the county in season: tbe publication day of th e C o u r i e r w ill be c h a n g e d fro m T h u r s d a y to'Wed­ nesday. U ; The circle of thirtymilea around Binghamton, which will be entitled to' the Courier free of postage, includes all the towns'of Broome County, and ppr- . lions of Tioga, Cortland, Chenango and Delaware / and.more than twenty miles in Pennsylvania. I T For farmers and mechanics \arid country pco* pie generally, as .well as the business men of our . towns,and village’s, 'a well conducted country paper, is far more valuable than a city paper, even at the same price. A country paper, if it is what it should be, is.adapted to-tlie wants of the country. It con­ tains all that is of interest in the city, papers; and in addition, il is the register of- our locaTnews and of our local business, wliich are of much more consfc. qucnco to us tlian. the tales; aiid’-slip'slop of.the city •press. ' The country press is devoted tothe interests of-tlie country. ' I f we have grcvt- measures , to‘ac­ compli sir, it .is ou.r advocate—if oor rights \and inter-' esisjue endangered, il sotm/is Ihe alarm, and'ftctorncs our active' defender. Why- then'sheut«i; it n<Vt b'o sustained ? ‘ ” \ : -■ -- • .T i i e B i n g h a m t o n C o u r i e r . a i m s a t b e in g aff. t l i a t is de.sirabfe in a c o u n t r y n e w s p a p e r . ’ I t is drivotcd t o th e - in t e r e s t s , o f B r o o m e .C o u n t y .— a n d to lju* drSscm f. n a t i o n , a m o n g i t s la r g e c i r c l e o f r e a d e r s , not .o n l y o f th e e a r l y a n d im p o r t a n t n e w s o f t h e tla y ,. b u t o f \ p u r e m o i a l s . ’aiid * tiie tr u t h in politics.* l l s higliC s t a s p ir a 1- lio n is to do goo d — a n d ‘a t t h e sa m b tim e , vVliite : it it* im p a r t i n g th e m o s t v a l u a b l e s t o r e s o f instiubT fori, i t ” w i l l , not f o r g e t to aim ise.- .A n d a ll th a t th e OVo'tO h e a r t y g o o d w ill a u d u n li n in g e f f o r t w ill e n a b l e utf tV» d o , to w a r d s th e a c c o m p l i s h m e n t - o f th e s e d e s i r a b l e - eri iis, w c p le d g e o u r s e iv e s to p e r f o r m , , D r o w n e d a t N i a g a r a F a l l s — A n in ter­ estin g little son o f M a jo r S. M . N W h itn e y , o f I th e C a taract H o u s e , N i a g a r a F a l l s , a b o u t five[ y e a r s old, w a s tak e n out of th e m ill race, in the re a r of th e house, by his f a ther, on S u n d a y after­ noon, d ro w n e d . It w a s supposed lh a t w h ile at play w ith o th e r boys on th e b r id g e , in th e re a r o f th e hotel, he fell into t h e w a ter. H is p lay 1 fellow s not b e in g old e n o u g h to ap p r e c iate hisj la n g e r , g a v e no a la r m . T h e ch ild w a s m issed F i f t e e n d a y s l a t e r f r o m E u r o p e . A R R IV A L OF TH E ACADIA. T h e s t e a m s h i p A c a d ia arrived at Boston Ju- bv-his father but a shorl tim e after the accidew, 3 j brin»m ~ London and Liverpool dale, lo When he made immediaie search, and found him | ,L iw , J „ ° „ e inclusive in the r a c k of a saw m ill, about* twenty* rods below w h e re he fell in. E v e r y effort w a s m ade to resusseitaie him. but to no purpose. The fam. ily are deeply afflicted by the Joss —{Buffalo Pilot. The money and stock market continued to present a favorable aspect. ^ T h e week oflhe Acadia’s sailmgciosed with large sales of cotton. T h e harvest promises’io be a b u n d a n t. . T h e M a y n o o ih B ill has passed t h e o r d e a l o f ClIOLERA AT C u l c u t t a .— A letter is pub- the P e e r s , by a m a jo r ity even g r e a t e r th a n ac- lished in th e N e w Y o r k papers, dated C a lcu tta com p a n ied its p a s s a g e th r o u g h th e L o w e r A p r i l 4, w h ich say s th a t th e ch o le r a w a s ra g in g H o u s e . T h e s e c o n d and th ir d re a d in g s w e r e th e ie , and lh a t from 5 0 0 to 6 0 0 d ied d a ily , th o u g h n u m e r ically sp e a k in g , triu m p h s of*stren<nh not m a n y had died am o n g th e s h ip p in g . L e tters T h e bill h a s n o w passed e v e r y stag e , save to th e 8th h a v e been received in this c ity. M o st L h e last— t h a t of re c e iv in g th e ro y a l assen t — of these letters d o not a llu d e to t b e ,c h o le r a , w h ile j T h e hurricane; ou t o f d o o r s a p p e a r s to h a v e o n e m e n tions th e d iso r d e r a s b e in g m o re th a n cea.«ed. u s u a l l y p r e v a len t. T h e season o f th e y e a r w a s F r a n c e a n d T exas — W e find i n t h e T i m e s a sic k l y o n e ; and am o n g th e low est c lass of the- an e * lracl fro:n its p a r is co r r e s p o n ( lem iv;n a in h a b itan ts w h o liv e a p r e c a r io u s life a«d eat lh e re p ly o f M . G u iz o t (w h o is quite restored to u n w h o leso m e food tb e m o rtality IS unusually health , and w h o re ap p e a r e d in th e C h a m b e r on great.— [Bo.*ton Daily Advertiser. j th e 10th June.) to a c h a r g e by an opposition . , .m e m ^ e r ' M . B ilJb a u lt, t h a t th e g o v e r n m e n t had C m n t o n P r i s o n . — T h e w o r k s a t tn is pris- jo in e d E n g l a n d in opposing* th,£ an n e x a tio n o f on a r e p r o g r e s s in g successfully an d rap id ly .— T e x a s to th e U n ited States, tn re tu r n for th e S in c e t h e a r r i v a l of th e 5 0 p r is o n e r s from S i n g concession E n g l a n d h a d m a d e to F r a n c e o f th e S in g , 10 m o r e h a r e been added to t h e i r n u m b e r , J r i g h t o f s e a r c h trea ty . M . G u izo t denied th a t sentenced from different counties. M f. C o o k , a n y stip u latio n relativ e to T e x a s had been m a d e th e ag e n t, is n o w on h is w a y h e r e w ith 5 0 from w ith re g a r d to th e ab a n d o n m e n t o f th a t treaty, th e A u b u r n prison. 1 w o p r is o n e r s ‘‘scaled th e W e (juotfe bis J a n g n a g e w ith re g a r d to T e x a s , rickets” a n d eseaped o n t h e J 4 th jnsL, b u t w e r e I a s staled by th e M o n iteu r , th e official o r y a n , re ta k e n tw o d a y s a fter. w h ic h th e T i m e s does not t r a n s l a t e : “ T h i s , is A f r i t i d i n f o r m s u s t h a t th e u tm o s t o r d e r p r e - a l l t h a t I can a t p r e s e n t indicate a s r e g a r d s T e x - T aile a t “ D e n n s m o r a ,” (tb e n a r a e g iv e n to th e [ as. I f T e x a & w ieh to re n o u n c e its independ- U r . VVisTAit’s B alsam of W ild C herry — Darien', Genesee county, N. Y'., June 20, 1843:—1 hav.ebccri afflicted with a very bad Cough for the last 4 years, s o m e t i m e s so s e v e r e l y t h a t I w o u ld ra i s e n o th i n g but c l e a r b lood ; a n d . fo r o n e year. I w a s tro u b le d so bad that I was pot able to labor at all. I have been st< ■ended b y e m i n e n t p h y s i c ia n s , and have taken fc n u m b e r of different k in d s of the’most highly approv­ ed medicines in the country— all of wliich gave me no relief whatever. Some few months since I com­ menced taking Dr. Wistar’s Balsam of Wild Cherry, and eai> cheerfully eay 1 derived inore benefit froni one bottle o f Dr. VVislar’s Balsam than all the medi- , cincs I have ever used. LOUISA CHADWICK. Miss Chadwick has lived in uiy family most ofthe time for two or three years, and 1 am well aCqfiWirttC'd with the facts drawn^up in the above siafciDCnt',- which I believe to be correct in all respects— and (f am assured that it was through the agency of Df. VVistar’s Balsam of W\Jd Cherry that-she received such benefit. '■STEPHEN KING, Supervisor and Postmaster, Darien, OTFor sale by L evi M. R exfoud , Binghamtoriv ' S ands ’ s S a r s a p a r illa . —This unrivalled prepara­ tion hat performed some most astonishing cures of diseases that are recorded in the annals of history« th u s p r o v i n g c o n c l u s i v e l y it is capable o f fu lf illin g th e h i g h a i m a ti d p u r p o s e for w h ic h It is d e s i g n e d :— Patients suffering for years from various chronic con­ stitutional disorders, after trying different remedies, spending thousands of dollars in travelling arid doc* to r i n g , a n d s u f f e r i n g a l t t h a t h u m a n n a t u r e is c a p a b l e of enduring, have, by the use of a few. bottles, entire­ ly recovered their health. Chronic Rheumatisin, Scrolula or King’s Evil, Salt Rheum and Ringworm, Ulcers and painful affections of the bones, Ulcerated throat and Nostrils, Scurvy, Biles, Chronic Sore Eyes, Blotches, and various cutaneous eruptions. Glandular Enlargement, Hip Disease, &c., are ef­ fectual! y cured by its use. Diseases having their origin in an impure state of the blood and fluids gen* erally will be speedily and effectually removed by this invaluable medicine a s its operation is peculiar, and consists in removing the cause of disease by entering into the circulation and passing through the general system. Where obstruct ions to its favorable opera­ tio n exist, tb e y are re m o v e d as it p a s s e s alo n g ; tbe alimentary canaf; hence the patient will. feel arid know the sensible operation of the Sarsaparilla from its curative powers. For further particulars and conclusive evidence of its superior value and efficacy, see pamphlets, whfeh may be obtained of agents gratis. . . - Prepared and sold, wholesale and retail, by A. B, . Sands & Co., Druggists and Chemists, 273 Broadway New-York. Price $ 1 per bottle: six bottles for $5. , I T For sale also by L. M. R exford , Binghamton.

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