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Schuyler County chronicle. (Watkins, N.Y.) 1908-1919, October 03, 1912, Image 2

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' »;=~' um I - “ _‘ \_.' , , A ;. >u ’ . V . . ' ‘ ‘AL’ -. 5 W ‘ ’-'5?!‘ —_‘7 ~ - v. ‘.-J‘ - 1 ‘ .Jv . -um. 36. w,g,45-t” 5.“ ,'f‘.:,._i3<‘§f 3}‘. _: fv: ‘ ~ A SCHUYLER COUNTY ,,;QI;1R0NT§§:L1?«f,:«OC'17OBER.3, _1912. ICHUYLER COUNTY CHRONICLE SHIPS AS THEY SINK. EARLY ' COLONIAL -HOUSES; SCHUYLERJOOUNTY-% conducted by John Corbett. Their Trip to tho, Bottpm and What Happens Afterward. sums I\-la {:ston'o¢\'1v;alIs, tp” 'R‘e§i5 ‘tho »Indi‘.aNn_ Raiders. ~ j. -_» ‘In America ‘the ea 2:13 rcdlqhists ?.hgd little use, for. the m,asopi1s_ 'aivit.= ;é;¢iept_::m thé. construction: 6.1. the‘ _'hi;ge;- -c4.h1i'_n_n‘e_y stacks which m e any? _qw¢11ing “ pt: .,e”o;na. siderable size‘i:and‘ a,ny.~m'eteiIsiox;s tq: comfort fprmed; a, ‘very 'confsIdei?.a'b1e part of the st‘1ft1g:t11re.. ' '1‘-he great.-k ItcVh- ‘en’ and oven, with smaller \héarthséin from two to four rooms on 1.?oll¢=c...~t¢j«‘»:-33,: successor to the Gayuta . . . . ..».'f...., ..;.'i .7..',\. A89. (§o‘6_pfe_r :‘C§,£hagip§‘V .. . . . . . . . Harvey’ Eo -:_H,<§,c;iéo1?;«ff.\V~ _.~.,: , . , . . . . Andrew ’é Goon . .. E. J. Stqddard -0198:-l}__E§3;'i)§j,,; a:,.s;.\V' .,.* Samuel .St'ewgg ;xf..;. .,;,;g;f.-é;ay. . . JO1111 Tirohe \. .'. .'.:'.:_,1§...,.1..~,‘; Lyman Disbrowé } Watkins Democrat, What becomes of the ship that sinks in midocean? If it is of wood it takes. in the first place. considerable time for it to reach the bottom. In a hundred or more fathoms of water a quarter of \an hour will elapse before, the ship reaches bottom It sinks slowly, and when the bottom is reached it tails gentlyinto the soft. _oozy bed, with no crash or breaking. 7 Established, 1865. D4 RECTORY. WATKINS. Board of Trustees. H. C. Stquffer . . . .T. W. McAnatney A.N.Go1try . Geo. E. Hoare F. L. Millen . . .. . .0. L. Overpeck C1erk__.-__--_..____ -_-_ Raymond I-Ioare each re‘qu;h°ed a very cong; .‘e__na-.. ble part ofhthe material a1l1_dUsl:Vi1led» labor bestowed ‘upon a <:olo.11ia'lA home- stead in the more northern éqlqnies. , Of course if it is laden with pig iron or corresponding substances or it it 1.5 an iron shijfit sinks rapidly and some- times strikes the bottom with such force as to smash in- pieces, Once sunken a ship pecoxnes the prey of the countless inhabitants of the ocean. , Cii.r3,’V11.t Á Cooper, Village Officers. -Catharine:-‘+AI9nzo V-aln Loon; Edward Garpe .iWi¥if.on- ' . I ‘ .1jixj+“_(>’scar ?C..,Behf1ett, Charles L Cale *af.f1d‘ George Ranlee. - ‘ ‘ ..Héct0r-+-Samuel .= ;\-Huston Elmer Bti.r1:;a.nd F.\ P». shaman. President B. W. Nye Treasurer H. Norman Collector R. H. Berry Police Justice . S. P. Rousseau. Assessors . . . . . . . . . -. . . . Henry Laraby C. L. Cole, S. B. Brown. Street. Com’r .. . . . . . .D. F. Thompson Chief of Police Emmett Ellis , In some. sections where the dangers of an attack by Indian raiders wefe imminent, the ’ wooden Walls ‘of the lower ‘story lnclosed a stout Wall of brick or a kind of rubble masonry. Some of these buildings are still stand- ing ’and inh‘a,bitejd, although dating back (at leaiet so far as the lower stories are concerned) over two ceni-' tulfies. A very few brick buildings; have'Who_l_ly or ln-:paoxT'; come doW'x_’1_to~‘ us from the years of5éolo1j1flza§o‘I'1. and until within the last half gentury some that Ap.reserv'ed the epeclullait fea- tures of Elizabethan and Stuart ‘types. of dwelling and“b”‘us1ne_s‘s ‘s.tnic.t.(11:es. Much of the brick -and’ about all. the: great “tiles and ornamental tiling wefe at ‘from 3114. rope; bnfllrhe _ang1‘N _brI_ck of good qua}; xty were rsbon~pro.du1ced in almost every‘ commun_lty.e—Charl'es-’Winslow Hall in -National Magazine. _ ‘ They swarm over and through the great boat and make it their home. Besides this they cover every inch of t_;_h_e_Qo31t with a thick layer of lime. This takes time. of course. and when one generation dies another continues the work until the‘ ship 1': so laden with heavy incrustatlons, corals. sponges and barnacles that if wood the__creak1ng timbers fall apart and slowly but surely are absorbed in the waste at the sea bottom. Iron vessels are demolished more quickly than those of Wood. which may last for centuries. The only met- als that withstand the_chem1c2_11 action V Mo1}fQur—Ja;méBf- 0.. Armstrong, Geo. M. *.Lée aghd GOOIEQ P. Lalor. , 4 . Water commissioners. President . .. . . . . . . . John M. Thompson Mott B.‘ Hughey . . . . . . . .J. W. Winters L. H.Dur1and .. .. . Geo. J. Magee See and Treas. ...G. M. Hoare Superintendent. . . .Cha.rles E. Dennis. Ora 5 1He,hderso,n, Hénry Eva3s§14 Kéllyf ‘ . :, Read_ing‘.—E. \C. McIntyre, John Elli- 7so.n, Geo. H53 Mathews. » \.l.‘-J3‘74V1\§11be.—\-:I\[_¢:=;lv'1_l1‘§-‘ ' Sproul, Marvin 1.’tiee5.Cha4r1es W,.';L..os’ey. Board of Education. Oliver P; Hurd... .. ....Frank L. Moran George E. King C. La.Dow J. B. Macreery C; Stou M. M. Cusp, Jr., ...'... Life Member Raymond Hoare, ............. Clerk @ 1912, by American Press Asnociagion. » . - ‘ FOR 'PRESIDENT,' TH EC DORE FOR VICE PRESQDENT, HIRAM ROOSEVELT. W. JOHNSON. scliooi *Ditebt6rs. V- Paul Pry Police. March of the‘ Dining Hour. '\:’a.yut,a,;.:. ._ D. sc'1iuy1e:‘,_ [Leg Bgles Catharine‘ ,-'.;H. J; Mi._tch§,ll‘,, E Dirc_lsj‘fens Dix. «aVGr_:é¢LT Rap1e.é_;.Att1im'.' ‘N-7.¥Go1tr‘y Hgct’or.”...C; W. Burr, 'Befr,yjari1i;1— \Biz.-gé Mon ..-Wm, Grojik. C; 'S.‘~:Hé.u_é1_1er Ora.nge.M. D. Lock‘15vood}.J.-‘G. Ovérhiaer Reading\ “Adrian 'J3'1i£_1::le,T_’H'j. VS, Howard Tyrone Q.F. A. \Se‘a.rs',, ‘E, 7[V{a1iDuzer Watklhn Glen commission. The German police‘ have a consum- lng curiosity about the visitor, They are polite. but the curiosity must- be satis and it covers well nigh every point upon which information can bé given. says Mrs. Alfred Sidgwick in “Home Life In Germany.\ . Before you have been in Germany a fortnight the police expect to know‘ all about you. You have to give them your father's Christian and’ surname and tell them how he earned his \living and where he was born; also your mother's Christian and maiden name and where she was ‘born. You must The hour or dining has ‘advanced, with the centuries. Frolssart mentions Waiting on the Duke of Lancaster at. 5 in the afternoon after he had supped. and was about to go to bed. and the preface of the Eleptameron shows that” the: queen of Navarre dined at 10 o'clock in the morning. From the Northumberland‘ Household‘ Book, dated 1512, We learn that the d‘uc-‘al family rose at 6. breakfasted at 7.‘ dined‘ at 10. supped at 4 and retired M_fo_r_t_:13ek' 1Jlg_l1t;_ p._t_ 9. Louis XIV.-‘did not (line on 12. wni‘le\Ei§ ‘cb’n£eini:o’r - Cromwell and Charles 11., took the meal at 1. In 1700 the hour was ad,-‘ vanced to 2. in 1751 we find “the ‘Duchess of Somerset dining at 3, and in 1760 Cowper speaks of 4 o'clock as I the fashionableetime. ztfterthe battle of Waterloo the dinner hour was all tered to 6. from which time it has ad- vanced by half hour stages to 8. $0 that in 400 years the dinner hour ma .gra_c1ually__mgy_e_d_.th@h atJ_egs_t_ te_x_1_ -ho_I1_r;a._91_! ,the_s1's1.xs-London Spectator- William E. Lei Chairman; John A. Clute, John B. Macreery, T. W. M<:Anarney, James B. Rathbone. Secretary and Treasurer. .F. E. Wixson Superintendent... Charles W. Nichols of the\ waves’ are gold and platinum. and glass also seems unaffected.‘ No matter how long gold may be hidden in the ocean. it will always be go_ld when recovered. and this fact explains the many romantic and adventurous searches after hidden submarine treas- ures lost in shipwrecks. Funky Péagaht Notions. MONTOUR FALLS. Vlllago Officials. The aStrOn6m_ic’al7lore of the Russian peasantry‘ of. the north, Vcenter‘ and south \bf the empire is limited to :1 knowledge of the existence ot’ the sun and the moon and stars. of three con- stellations‘; of the. Milky way. of”“one plaVx;9t,7 of cqmebs. shooting star,s'.»i1nd meteors. The suxi 1s7\to- £11‘ ‘a t ous and bene being. » President-_____.._-__-____- J. C. Haynes Collector, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ansel Roberts Treasurer Fred J. Dunham. Collector Oscar Curtis Assessors, A. .0. Teetsel J. 0. Kilbourn, Henry Dunham Board of Trustees. Harry Stotenbur . . . .. .. .E. W. Hibbasrd James Towart ......James A. Shepard Board of Education. - ‘lira. James Shepard, William Cronk, Dr. J. M. Quirk........ Geo. F. Barton James Towart F. L. Schlick clerk ...........Chs.r1es R. Watkins. The First Mountaineer. A Munich paper has been searching the records of; history to discover who were the first mountain climbers. It gives the palm to Moses for his as- cent of Mount Sinai and rules out Noah for his ascent of Mount Ararat because he made it in a boat. There is sui evidencekto showjthst the ancients thought mountain cliniliinéi sheer madness. No one in the time or Horace or Polybius wanted to go climbing for a summer holiday. A. Chinese emperor in the seventh ce'n- tury was the first to make climbing ~fashionable-in-the~eest,~but——t'he; true tourists in Europe seem to have been Dante. Petrarch and Leonard. Then came the Emperor Maximilian Lr~Wtho~.use(L.to.hu_ I I - n I _ s Watkins Frank A. Frost _1§Iohtour_Falls ..... G, W, Fletcher 13urdett;= Frank Dunhagn 'Bennettsburg . .. . . Fred Chase Mecklenburg . . . . . .. . . ., . S. G, Bodle Reynoldsville John T.‘ Hand‘ . Valoig Nelson‘ Egbert Hector William Wickham Ioaessa . . . . . ., . Dean‘ \Mitchell. Catharine .L. 1-1. Roberts f Alpine George N.‘.W'ager_ Cayuba..___....-__-......_....Glenn Schuyler §eg3e:__pams E; Moore Moreland \SEit’iofC}‘.'.‘§7 Monterey Iiée” Tyrone E. R.Bla§jell' ’ Altai Frank;Ke,n‘da.ll Reading Center . John ML’. 0019 . Rock stream ......h... Charles. Finch declare your religion and it you are married give your husbaucrs Christian and surname: also where he was born The mooh. covered with ice and snow, is ever in from its broth-» er, the sun. Upon its disk is f3ortray- ed the murder of Abel by Gain, the “la'tte‘r' being ’ done‘ to with -a pitchfork. The: -lunar rays are malig- nant, and evil. comes to those who. sleep unprotected from them. The horns of the moon atrord information .es..to;jthesw.eat‘her.. ._ ._x___:___g W The stars ‘are lamps or candles light- ed‘ and extinguished by the Eternal: A ‘shooting star is the soul of one \just passed away‘. gCOmQt8 arelheralds. of ‘_ rand famine. No Russian ever‘ imd what he does for a living. If you 1it[pi)'\en\ \fo 'd'o”' zi'i1’y‘thin‘g “yourself. though. _you need not‘ mention it. They do not expect a‘ woman to be anything further than married-‘or sin- gle. But you\ must say when and BU RDETT. Board of Trustees. --~~~~~»- President . . . . . . . . . . . .Chas 0.. Williams J. B. Donnelly . . J. 'P..Hoyey Treasurer . Irvin Dunham Collector . . . . . . . . . . . . C1aren<:_e__Egrte1lo Clerk George Kep er Board of Education. George R. Smith. . . .Miss Rita. Williams where you were last ln._G.er.manx_a1.1d_ J1o:w,.,o_£te.n_19._u. ,.h_ay_e_b,e§_tI.§l_I;<1,,I>Ln27.5?9I! have come now and what you are do- mg and how long you propose to stay. _‘ , Painting Turkeys’ Logs. V. Amongthe many tragles whlph exist, ‘_’ b11t‘Whiare‘not as a rule filled up in Emergency H liars. tains near Ir,1_n_sgr31_r.-_l;L_x_11;,(1 after him Conrad von Gesner and Josms Simler explored the ‘Swiss mountains. But climbing for pleasure such as we know It today was not thought of until quite recently. It at any time you -u a paiF7)T gas pliers. perhaps to take off a gas tip that is not working well. and you have none at hand you can always make a pair that will do the work for the mo- ment. although they might not be just the thing for a gas Take a large pair of scissors. and you will find that Where the handles join the blades they usually open out into a sort of oval. By putting a piece of sandpaper or anything rough round the base of the gas burner you can place this open part of the handle of the scissors round it and then press the blades. of the scissors together so as to get lev- erage enough to twist the burner loose. There are many little light jobs that can be done with a pair of pliers made out of a pair of scissors if you are careful to have something between the handle and the object so as to pre- vent the scissors from slipping oft.-\-— New York Sun. > I the census papers,\ are Eh F\‘?§iEéF§”‘6f all kinds, from the manufacturer of antique fumitnre and brassea to the bird fancier who ‘can pass a sparrow‘ as a canary. Perhaps :the most cur’i6“us_ form of “faking” is .that’_which deals with turkeys, dead or -alive. and which is principally practiced in~France. The age of a turkey is told chie by its legs and beak. These are filed and treated with a special varnish by the .“fake1=\ two or three times a week be‘- tore the bird ;ls_to,.be.s.old- _1t.3szlll.th§é_.n.. to all app‘earance.‘have renewed its youth. and its owner is‘ able ‘toobtain a much higher price. The freshness or the dead birds is also largely told by the color or the legs. and for this, too. a Varnish is used. The varnish was the discovery 01 .a Frenchman. Pete Chapellier. who seemsto -have been a really remarkable man. as he hadmany irons in the lite and died worth a con- ‘siderable su‘m.—-London ’1‘el‘egrap'h, forgets tha Napoleonic war fol- lowed the great comet of 1811.—Ex- change. ' Hollen C.‘ Smith What Makes I Nation. Postof of the Past. ODESSA. Board of Trustees. I believe there is no permanent greatness to a nation except it be- based upon .moralii;v. *1 do not care for military greatness or military re- npwn. I care for the condition of-the people among whom I live. 'vCrowns, coronets. miters. military display. the —pomp—of——war.——_wide¢<~:elonies._a.nd_1L. huge empire are, in _my view. all tri- light‘ as air and not Worth consid- ering unless with them you can have a fair share of comfort,.conteni1nent and happiness among the great body of the people. Palaces. baronial cas- ties, great halls. stately mansions. do not make a nation. The nation in ev- ery country dwells in the cottage. and unless the light of your constitution can shine there. unless the beauty of. your legislation and the excellence of your statesmanship are impressed there on the feelings and condition of ‘\thetpeople:-‘rely-«upon~«it~you—~»have yet to learn the duties of government.«—- John Bright. . - Town or Hector: Cayutaville, Lo; gun, Penry City, Searsburg, Smith Va!- ley. - V ' President . N. Mallett Wm. Mitchell . , . . . . . . . .Howard Ward Treasurer . . . . . . . . . Harvey Couch. collector . . . . .‘. . . . . . . . John Hodges. Clerk D. L. Shelton-‘ \I noticed a statement in an eastern paper the other day that has dlsquiet- ed me a good deal.\ said 11 Cleveland man recently. \The item called to my attention the fact that It takes a dol- lar at the usual rate of interest more ‘than two years to earn a dime. You can see the effect. Every .time Ispend 8. dlme I think or that toiling dollar spinning away in the dark somewhere. The dime I spend means more than two years of steady application. and yet I let it go as if it were or too small value to be at all considered. Why, it takes a dollar more than a year‘ to earn 5 cents! -Think of that when you slip the next nickel aéf-oss. It really makes me feel uncomfortable. I wish I‘ ‘hadn't reed the stupid thing.\-— Cleveland Plain Dealer. Hardworking Dollar. ,Town-or Reading: Reading. Pine Grove, North Reading. - '_1‘own of Orange’: East Orange, Su- gar H111. . - \\Pown-of*B1x~:-4l’ow-naeni;-Wedgwood Moreland. ‘ \ Town of Tyrone; Weston, Wayne ~ Board of Education Dr. A. E. Jackson ...Ralph Stanley ;- Louis E. Catlin TRAIN TIME. Congress .. 2 .E. S. ‘Underhill Senate . . , . . . . . . . . John F. Murtaugh Assembly -John'W. Gurnett Judge and Surrogate....0Iin T. Nye. Su1jrogate’s Clerk. . . . . . ,A. 13. Ellison Disffiéf ‘Attorney. . . . . . .Fra.nk Johnson Supt. of Poor. -. . . . .. . . .. .0; M. Bronson County Clerk; . . . . . . . . . . . H. Bissell Treasurer. . . . . . . . . . . .. ...Be1ij. E; Birge Sheriff. ‘. a 5 S 5 3 3, 5 3 ‘i‘o' 5 an 0. C001]. ‘Supt; of Highways ....James P. Frost Supt ‘of Weights\ . .. . . .Geo. 0. Starkey‘ Election Commissioners, Charles \Chap- man, Pres., J. L. Shulman, Sec’y and ‘Treas, Trains Leave Watkins: North: 5:54; 10:57 9,. In. 2:05; 6:18 p. m. « ' p. m. \ ‘Sunday: North, 5:64; 10:57 3. m. Bouth, 2:56; 10:03 1). m. ' New York central. Trains Leave Wat-k-Ina-~Station The Baby and fho Junk Scales. The young couple hastened into the union Bt ..r..>§_t921Lt_1!2? they were not married. They were aito-‘ gether too chummy for that 7'.l‘he‘y ‘went out onto the platform and stood talked for 9. minute. when he took her In ‘his arms and kissed her fondly and again hurried away toward a -‘trfain. “What do you think of -that?\ in- quired one of ‘the attaqhes of the sta- tion. f ‘ “That looks all right. Why?” ’ “They do that three or four times a week. They think that everybody else think that he is going away on a longijourney, but he has never got on a train yet-, He» simpfy [walks around’ back of the train and disappears. He ‘gets his kiss al1Aright.[though;\’—-Loualsé ’v1lIe Times. . 4 Love will Find a Way. When a son was born to the head of a certain family in an Ohio town the proud father rushed out of the house to borrow‘a ‘pm: of scales. Just as he dashed out of the gateway he ‘ran into 9. junk dealer, who was calling out at the top ot his lungs: \Any rags, any bottles. any\-— ''‘‘Look here!” exclaimed the excited parent. “Come into the house! I want you to weigh something for me.\ '_ The man did as requested. The pink mite was‘ tied up in a ‘towel and hook- ed on to the scales. — “Six pounds!” cried the nurse. ‘ North: 7:42; 11:47 a. m., 5:40 p. In. South: 9:58 3.. In. 3:43;. 8:20 p. 111. Sunday, North: 11:47 a. m., 5:40 p. In. South: 9:58 a. m., 5:55 p. m. Transfer Leaves Watkins 50 M. ‘he- tore Trains. Subsidence of the Bermudas. It is contended that the Bermuda islands are merely the remnant of an island. very much larger than the pres- -ent entire group. which has sunk into the ocean. The original island, it is asserted, had an area of 300 or 400 square miles. whereas the Bermudas of today are only about twenty square miles in‘ area. Within a comparatively recent period. according to Verrill, the Bermudas have subsided at least 80-01- 100 feet. Their base is the summit 01 an ancient volcano, ‘while their Surface is composed of shell sand drifted into bills by the wind. and consolidated by in - Power of a Song. A pleasant incident happened at the Crystal palace in London when Mme‘. Albani was once singing the “French Partridge.” As soon,.as the concert was over one of the audience, a gentleman Well known as .a -good shot and keen’ sportsman, called upon Mme.- Albanl‘ and said. “Madam. 1 am sorry to say that I have shot many -a.little ‘red leg’ in my but after hearing you sing that song‘ I will never\'1‘d1’I another.” a delicate compliment to a great singer- and to a song.» ’ Lehigh _V_aHey. \ Trains Leave Burdett Station. North: 7:29 a. In. 4:32 4:56 p. In. South: 10:22 a. m.;1:0O, 4:50 p. m. Sunday: All except; North, 7:29; South, 4:50. , Transfer Leaves Watkins, 90 M. be‘- tore Trains. Cayuta W.-Swartwood Catharine Eugene Sawyer‘ Dix Arthur J. Peck’ Hector . .. , . . . Wm. K. Mulligan Montour . . . . . . . . . . C\urra;nV Jaqksdn Orange . . s‘. . J’ési3e' ,W1iitehé8d Reading ‘John Corbett Tyrone D. Swarthout Clerk .,.........;..-....-.. ..-. Osborn Sinith \Six pounds!\ repeated the disap- pointed .fai:her. ~ ‘ M The junkman ‘smiled. “Don’t let that worry you, my friend,\ ‘said he. “Them. is the scales I buys by.’ I guess the kid Weighs ten ‘pounds. maybe a little over tlmt.\——-Dejtroit Free Press. Trolley Time. _ Watkins tor Elmira: 6:00 9.. m., and Every Hour thereafter till 11:00 p. m. Elmira to Watkins: 5:30 a. m., and Evtry Hour thereafter till 10:30 a. m. The Largest of ‘Thgir Kinds. ‘«*S1_‘r Oliver Lbdge once gave a. striking the minuteness of the atom. The éam of.’ gold in water. although very small. seems con-— siderable when stated in atoms, for a single d1\‘op- of.‘ sea water contains 50.- 000.00o'_atoms qt gold; That howevef. ‘i‘ndic_ate§ merely, Moxie- of agrain in a ton of sea water,‘ axid‘ it‘ ‘Would take '100.060,000‘ato\ms to be visible under‘ :1 microsciope of the highié ést ‘powér. . , Q _ ’ Mihutenesb of‘ an Atom.- A _po'znpous physician who was in- clinedi to criti‘c1\seY<)tl1ersr was watching- a. stonemaison build a_ fence for his neighbor. and thought the mason wz_1‘s using too much mqrtar. He \said. “fJi'i1‘;'i,.. mortar covers up ‘a good many mis- talies. does it not?” T . _ ‘;*Yes. ’d,o1ct__or,\. replied‘ the ~mason. ‘_‘é1_qd__ so _dQes fhe'7 spade?’ “— L91,di_es\’ Home Jo‘u-that‘. '- , ' — ~ [- nuts or’ Inf Yon: The greatest ‘bank in the world is the Bank of England; the largest Iibfary is the National in Paris, containing néar~ ly é3.000,000 volumes: the largest th9a~ ter is the Paris Opera I’;Ious‘e.s uéoréring three acres: the largest bronze statue is that of Peter the Great in ‘St. Peters- burg. weighing 1,100 tons: the biggest stone statue is in Japan, forty+fo1ir feet high; the Iargest college is in: Cairo; with over 10.000 students and 310 teachers. ' ‘ Cayutaé . . . .4 . . . . .0, D, Schuyler Catharine . . . . . . . . . . . .Louis ‘E. Catlin Dix‘ .'_.. .- ..«.».-._.'.A E. 0; '(3oo'per_ Hector . . . .. . . . , ,..J'oeI M,..15ean Montour ..v. . . . -. .'_... . . ..:?Bert 0; Dubois Orange, .~. . . . . . 5 . . .~..; , B. W; ;Spié,er. .-1 '. u 0 '. 5 ,‘. . _. o 5 . 5 .ChR9»' C838 Tyrone .'’.A..,_., .=—. .., . .- . . J. W. Arnold. INSURANCE DEPARTMENT. -July 3'. 1912. “’BIeeged‘ ‘to yo‘. sah.\ said a dis: gruntled looking. negro who had edged his way into the ,.ot of :1 -prominent Arl_:an§_a_s attorney. “and T wants to git a div‘o’.c'e fqm , mun‘ wife on ‘de grounds datoshgéhnzs do th’ow.in’.' things at me f0‘ (19 last seven ye‘ahs'.’5\ “Ah! And havev any of the miss seriously ‘injured you-2-\ “Sah? N0. sub! She_ didn't th’6W none\ 0’ dérn’ s:'1't'vt—'uh ar-tickles at me; she dess ! and stove han?1es. ‘and skiliets. and‘ a ’casioual cat or dog. or s‘u‘pp_in’ dntgumway; V And (ley didn't none ot\‘emo hit‘ zr1e.—:tl:'rt -is. twen yit. Butwid an dis yuh practisin’ somelo’ days s1xe’s_ ~gwin'é o to _ git». to be whoatthey‘«ca11 :1’ expert and bust mun oixead-P\-Woman's Home Companion. ‘V Aznencan Bonding Company Iocgtcd at Bammore. in the state of Sam. ltnd, has In. this o 8- sworn. statement by the proper officers thereof showing its 1c,qnd;tzoi1._and,,bu'si_r1eas' and has éomplied in a1_l‘rci:pect_a with the lawn‘ of _thiq'State relat- inf to Castjglty Ixisurance ‘Companies ,it'1<;or- potated by other States of the‘ United States: NOW; TEE?‘-W032’. In pm-§'u'ance of l:'.w,AI William T. Emmet, Su'ennt,endent of In- surance, bf the,State ‘of N York, do hereby certify ‘that said Company is hereby authorized to- transact its ‘apprdpriate businesa»of Casualty ‘insurance in’ thi§ State in accordance with law. during‘ the current year. The condition and business of said Company at the date‘ ‘of such ftaixitetncnt (December 31, 1911), is shown : o owe: * V’ K. A 1'cjso.¢<'a'js§fy. » * ‘fA'<’:_co;‘ding to this paper,\ said Mrs. Najggsg. “Widows ‘make the best W_ives.?‘ I. '.‘i don”; doubt it, my dear,\ replied Naggs. “but neverthelesg» I doz1’t.1’ee_l justi in shuf off.‘ at the‘ prgseni; moment merely for the sake 01‘: tnztkingi :1 good W1fé;of7yo11.\ V. S'u‘p\ts.. of ‘Highways; Cfayuft'a- .*~. Q . . .~. . . 1.. .. Edwardé Decker Catharixle ~. . . . 1. . . ‘.* ~.‘.II:a1iris0n_ '~Chapman Dix Wi11{is“L. _Fr‘o3t Hectdr . .. . . .. .. . z. . . Alva. Jaquish . . 5 z . -.51 . V.-». d .- H _ . .-a - - .u 5}‘: p on 9 In A Bad spin. Biftm-ly—-LWhen you and your wife; were married you used to call‘ each other “birdie.” <1idn’t you? Me- Swat-—-Yes. B'i1fer1_v'--'DoM you still do it? Mcsxvat-'-‘Well. 1 call her 1'1 parrot and a magpie. and she ugualiy to me as a jay‘.-—'-Ex'<':hang'e. _ Getting Speci' ‘fHere’s a youngwoman left $600.- merely for. spming 9; little. sun- sxiine Into an old‘ m_an\s Ii_f_'e.” ‘ .Ag:tf-egatc amount of admitted ;As- , __ oi. -59. H‘. 0 .,oo'o.--yo as -3‘ n . 4‘: «$2,776,237.56 -Aggregate amount, ‘of Liabilitxcp _ “(except Capital and Surplus)‘ hi- _ ‘ eluding? re\-xnsurance ..,-'. ~‘. ...~..»,. . 1,3Zl,952;28 'Amo’ux'1t ‘of’ actual péidaup »Capxta'1~ '7S0,000.00 Surplus Jail 'Iig‘bi!_iti¢_a-.u.-,_. . ..».~ 704,«285.‘2B_ Amount of Income fox,-‘tl_1e\fyexr... 1,547,484.39 Ambnnt oi Diubunexhehts or the V , )‘¢If?' .-. .5...‘ 4 .;. n .o 5 . ;§a~¢'.ug a cs.-., 1,373,142.13 Inf W1‘-rxtss Wnxitor, rhnsé 'hei-duntchég I ‘péribfed nlnie‘ and caubed‘ they ie;1.of,p1y -ea 1:. mixed the dgjy nu: above it te ~ . ‘ .~ . .\ . ‘ we ‘'r- {nu} _ -- ~ Supt. (._7I~1,!|it13ln¢0.- W“H'er experience is -more fortunatga than mine. 11 on_ce_'spil1ed a cup or ‘co Into an ‘old m£'m'_’s\lap and” he cut méxxout of l1'is\wi1l altogether.”-‘- touisvilile Courier-Jouma'I., .Morr.'3s‘ 1Gilb'.eri:v sh: céuldp Sea 7f|.t. fjfyrone Edwlijné J. Bailey Miss— -‘You earn $5051 month, Before’ I mart}? you“ you'll have to earn $50 a week. ,1\’I.isbe:‘-T-B-butwith you a mouth would seem. but a week,-—‘Neiw York Globe. \\ ' , ‘ . 0.\jrer'»s'e\e_r;s/\_ j9f_ th¢- -Poor\. Cay1;fa.\ ». .,...‘ ~.».. .»...;., .. . Leroy Butters Catharine ..,.%». .-.1. ...-Ralph Stanley‘, Biz‘; .1. .0; 'E.=HaLrimgr, “I_Ienjry W.‘ Phelps Ifecfsor‘ .;.‘.J'.f Senora,‘ George- ‘ Kepler‘ l!£on't)o1_1‘1_\ Dmuie Vs,h ‘Gorder Orange‘ . \” , . . . . .' . .1. %Geo‘r\g“e-W; .-BVennVett;' » Satis With Squnvd. If a person determines early‘ in lité that :1 cheerful dlspbsltion is worth niivlng and strives’ to “obtain it and does so that person is» a success, In‘ 8. .sense~ot the wford. Mrs; Pe.ck--We\ 5599‘ bee,“ married twenty years‘ '”t6day. John John: (with a sigh»-Yes; for twenty years we've“. tough:\~ Mrs. iPeck.(scow1ing)—-What? John (’quickly)—eLite’s battles together. Maria; %. J. ‘ \ I Nmojly Tumgd. “true man -1,1jas'a wondei-1:u1 ~t_1ow~ oi laxigua'ge.\ 821151 the impnesislonuble 7 ' ; % ..»Yes'.'\ replied Miss Cayenne. “He is’ -one of the \pe9p]‘e who wouid: rqithéjr .tu’lk.tl1a’n be listened to , 4‘ ‘ _ _8VomotLi'm,os Happens. Mm Whyte-1 sundératand» she ma‘:-, beneath jher, Mrjs. ‘Brownee,-729,5} the young man in the below=.-=~Som- ezwille Jdumal. ?‘l5?.A31\I.3l3IS:S£E_I;I Agent, WdfE.~in1é} ‘mt. Your real in is measured by your treatment or you“rsel:t.—-.Alcot‘t.. 23' _a‘ - 0 O a 4- n n I I '$ 'u,.v a . .11.‘ 6‘-_q 9.“; 5 .3

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