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Lewis County Democrat. (Lowville, N.Y.) 1865-1910, December 25, 1867, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn83031645/1867-12-25/ed-1/seq-1/


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g.iMM.1 nir¥iihir) £\**^\j •ON Mam sriteAMfc A THE DEMOCRAT, rUUUSHKD KVKIIY WKI1NKSI1AY MOIlNIMIj jit U>WVIU.K, N. Y. fc^-i .'it O'Doitnell ct C').'« /McJt, JVU*}I ^r f cl to. ». Ra-A-wwixxsia «. co., KIHTOiia AND 1'IIOI'ItlKTOl.H. Terms of Subscription. Two DOLLARS a your if paid in udvunce. Ii Bot paid wkliin the year, l''irn' UKNI'S addition- al will bis charged. I'oor, disabled soldiers, nnil deeripld old men, Vrho cannot ult'uril to support a paper in their family, upon leaving their numes ,a this ullk-e Will receive uu occasional copy gratuitously. Terms of Advertising. Twelve Lir.cs make u Square, -and where an Advci'tisoiuoiilia less thuu u square,itiscliarged tits ouo, unless a special ugrcuuiuiit is made in the contrary. \Spuoe. | 1 w.|2 w.jl m.|a ni.| M m.|0 m. |l yr. rsquiircT | l.Bl)|2.UU|2.6i>|4.6(i|o.l (i|lu.i>iijlr>.Ou £~squareB | ! *.W|8.0i)j 4.BD|'7 1 liU]l).(iii|i«. ,lu il8i'lP (J 8qiii»'ory¥.MjJ4\.'l)ii]».liii|!».liii|l'i.(iii|l.lliil|22iill {column. | 4.(i(i|0.«iO|H.(io|ilOiP[l'ioi)|lBiMi|:!iPiii' (\column. | fi.i)o|8.iio|iaoii|iaii(i|20(iii|2riiiii;4.\ { column. |10iili|l40ii|IHiiii|22iii>|:{iiiiii|ri'>iinjli;,ni LIADRB SPKCIAL NTOTIORS double tin- above fates. Traneient advertisers onc-tliii'd advance lir the above. Notieesinsurtcd as News Matter twenty emits drat line, every subsequent line fifteen cents. No paper discontinued, except at the option ttf the publisher, until all arrearages arc paid. Job Printing. Our facilities for Job Printing are not sur- passed in the oountv. To this brunch of our business we pay particular atsention. and be- lieve wo oan give good satisfaction to all who favor us with their pntronuge. ^BUSINESS CAKDS. IIIINlVV 13. \'JX KM KB, ATTORNEY <& COUNSELOR JL T LA W Iiowville, Lewis County, N. *ST bounties obtained for discharged soldiers, kc. Office in the Leonard block. 118 ' cIiAVro. \AJUAMV Attomoy and Counsellor at Law, Lowville N\. Y. Ollice in the Leonard block. Particular attention paid to couections.and Conveyancing. nl ' E7S. ifiJEittiiEiiT - \ A Uoruey and-Counsellor atlaw, and /tolicitor and Oouncellor in Equity. Lowville, Lewis County, \ EoWAiib ~~A7K i Jiow«, ATTORNEY d- COUNSELLOR AT LA W. Agent for Pensions, Bounties, &c. Office in O'Donnall's Block, Lowville, (formerly occupied by N. B. Sylvester, Ksq.) 4D. JE. STEPfl'ENS, COUNSELOR AT LA W AND NOTARY PUBLIC. Particular attention paid to collections and Conveyancing. Oliice corner of State and Day an streets, Lowville, N. Y. SWCITH di COLlTlNS, -ATTORNEYS & COUNSELORS AT LA W. Offico No. 126 Gcnesec-st.. (two doors below canal andT. 0. Grannis' bank) I'TICA. Will attend to cases in bankruptcy, and ether business of the State and United States Courts. ISIO. W. SMITn. JNO. D. COLLINS. A. tt. CKOSBY, M. D. Formerly of Martinsburgh, N. Y., has removed to Lowville for the practice of his profession. Office and residence on Dayaa street, formerly occupied by Dr. Gebbie. n2titf PHYSICIAN & SURGEON. rBRMANKNT IHSSWKNOH,. , •rxraFiiwr. INT. TT. . M. M. Kic-.hardson, LICENSED AUCTIONEER,- Will promptly respond to all calls in this line. ' ii. smiiAUis, FASHIONABLE HAIR DRESSER AND SUA MT 0 ONER, •Will put razors in order, and keeps the best fanatity for sale. Perfumeries of all kinds. Shop in Winchell's block, Lowville, N. Y. B OSTWIOK HOUSE. MAIN STREET, LO WVTLLE, N. N. WILLIAM HOWELL, Proprietor. Daily stages leave this house to connect with the cars at Boonvillc.and forDenmark, Carthage, Copen- hagen and Watertown. - Wlti«H'I\S HOTEL, TURIN N. Y. X. WRIGHT, 1'ioprietor. This house is furn- ished with the most excellent stabling m the county,and is designed, in every way to fur- nish first-class accomodations to the traveling public. 47 lL_ HUBBARD'S HOTEL, TJtUSSIAN SETTLEMENT, CROOIIAN, LU WIS COUNTY, N. Y. S. B. HUBBARD, Proprietor. The best accom- modations to be found at this hotel for the •raveling public—careful attention, good sta- bling, &c. Passengers conveyed to and from the steamboat landing. The best facilities for hunting and fishing parties cm be found at this house and excellent guides provided when desired. istt JTACK.MAW H*»*'SE, (Fronting on^Court and Arsenal sts.) WATERTOWN 7 , N. Y. Stages loave this House for all parts, daily. 16-ly BACON & JONES. Proprietors. WOODRtFF HOUSE, WATERTOWN, N. Y. D. C. BURNETT, (formerly of American Hotel) Proprietor. 26-ly COUNTY DEMOCRAT, NO NORTH, NO SOUTH, NO EAST NO WEST ; BUT THE UNION AND THE CONSTITUTION. NOW AND FOK&VER »>' VOL. XIX LOWVILLE, 1ST. Y., \WEDNESDAY DEC. 25, 1867. NO. 20 *Om Mki M9M ALL HAIL! LOOK—READ UIimilSIITS! H. T. G0ODEN0U6H HAS BHMOVK1) HIS JEWELRY STORE, TO 'J'UBHTOItE OF KC'OTTS i MV'AKTV AND IIA VIiVU JUST RETURNED FROM THE ClTi, Would invite the people of Lewis comity to call and examine Ids stock of Fine, Ladies' Gold Watches, AMERICAN WATCHES, 01' ALL KINDS, Swiss Watches, FROM SEVEN DOLLARS OTWARDSI A VliKY LAUGH ASSOKTMEJfT OP OLOOKS I ALSO, A LAKGE ASHOKTMHNT OF TUB LtUc^t und Most Approved Siyi«s LA DIES AND GENTS' Fine Gold Rings, SEAL. TOP and PLAIN, 18K. Gold, Silver antt Flaittd Chains. Till! LATKST PATKIINS IN PURE SILVERWARE. A Fine Assortment of DOUBLE & TRIPPLE PLATED WARE. The Goods Sold at this Establishment are War- ranted to be Just as Represented. |gg~ REPAIRING of Watches and Jewelry done in the most approved manner. The most difficult jobs we give an especial at- tention. P. S.—Call and examine my stock, it is no trouble to show goods. 17tf Don't Forget the Place, In the Leonard Block, I'irst Door North oftha Lowville Bank, Main-it. II. T. GCODENOUGII. AGENTS WANTED, BVKKYWIIISRE BOTH JIKN AND WOMEN. -rpKOM $74 TO $HiO PER MONTH PAID, Jj or a chance to make twice that amount selling on commission. THE MPROVtiD Common Sense Family Sewing Machine. It makes the Elastic Lock Stitch, You can cut every other stitch and yet eanni t pull the cloth apart without tearing it. It sews on all kinds of cloth and so simple that it never gets out of order. We Warrant our Machinexfor Five Years. l'BICE EIGHTEEN DOLLARS: Those -wishing to purchase a Machine, or wanting employment will send for circular. Please address J. A. SECOMB & CO., 9yl Adams, Jell'. Co.) N. Y. \1 LOBE HOTEL. G Nos. 14, 16 and 18 Whitesfcoro Street, (A few steps from the Railroad Depot) UTIOA, N. V. This tiew,cominodious, and conveniently located Hotel is now open for the accommodation of the public It has been thoroughly renovated and repaired, repainted and newly furnished throughout. The stabling is the most exten- sive and best in the city—accommodating 10U horses without crowding—and abundantly sup- plied with water and every other facility. The house will be kept in the best manner, and no pains spared to serve the convenience and com- fort of guests. The public patronage is respectfully solicited, 9 JOHN P. GRUPP. HI11BY HOUSE, WM. C. HANCUETT, Proprietor, Court street, Watcrtown, N. Y. This houce has under- gone thorough refitting and offers the bestac- coinmodations for_the_traveling public. n26 E7~O. JOKES, Has all the facilities for BOOKBINDING. BLANK BOOKS of all descriptions kept con- stantly on hand. Also, PLAIN AND FAN- CY PAPER BOXES, at as low rates as can be got anywhere. 65 FIIANKMNSQUARK, Utica. ~ XS»Til«'\\ n FiirLTr?*rM A »~T\7\\ ADVERTISING AGENT, No. 4 EXCHAXOK BUILIMNUS, UTICA, N. Y. Advertisements inserted in any paper in the United States at publisher's lowest rates. 24yl VABTSAM'JEiT* sHIinrII, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in FURNITURE, WINDOW SHADES, MATTRASSES, &c, &o.i9PUBLIC SQUARE i \\WSBBANCE A«EN«:V.—CASH As- sets over TWENTY MILLION Dollars. jETXA, Hartford.iueor. lRl'.l,assets.|;4.478,100 HOME,' 1 '15 Hrinidwny, N. Y :»,«4:i,»88 HAKTFOIID, Conn., incur. 181c 1,788,lfi3 , CONTINENTAL, 1()2 Rroadwny,NY. l,fif)R,18fi fSROl'RITY, 9-1 Pine street, N.Y... 1,421,32fi INS. CO. of N. AMEKlCA.l'hiln .... 1,731.000 INTKRN'ATIONAL, New York city. 1.444:936 PIKENIX, ISO Broadwrty, N.Y... . l,«fia.nsB MANHATTAN, N. Y., inunK l«2i.. l,nn2.12R I,AM\R. Bo Wall street. N.Y 43:1,321 A'lRHHTLTURAL, Watcrtown, N.Y. SiiO.ong TRVVKLEKS', Accident, Mart ford.. 741,337 OHARTKIt OAK UFH «.< 8,o0»,noo Aggregate eaplt.nl . ...' *23.33B,flOO MORRIS CHAPE, Agent, n 23 I.owville.N. 1 t^ = Tiry<»Mir l»7ii««\i\ii»«»*• , i» dull. au»d you can sell eheip ndvertiir in the Lewis Conn {y Democrat. Our renders ran .li-ni 1 est with Iwlrertisers, ns tlierebf tl.ry know fl-tm to bp MM mcrcl.ant*. \GREAT BARGAINS BOOTS AND SHOES! G ENTLEMEN, LADIES AND MISSES, can be supplied with every variety oi Boots, Shoes, Gaiter* and Slippers, at extremely low prices. The public arc re spcctfulh invited to call and examine my Large Stock of Goods and Prices. Store one door north of the Post Office. DAVID WETMORE. MartinBburgh.Feb. 24,1865 WATCH REPAIRING! rfJM JOJttBMJTG. T I1R UNDERSIGNED, has obtained the ser- vices of MK. William Weaver, An Experienced English Workman, and is now prepared to do all kinds of Watch Repairing, Engrailing, Jobbing, Ac. Any part of a watch manufactured to order. Mr. Weaver cannt Bo excelled ns a workman, and his work is warranted to give satisfaction. A fine assortment of CLOCKS, WATCHES, JEWELRY AND SPECTACLES, kept constantly on hand. . If your watch gets nut of repair call at Sla- ter's Jewelry Store. S. SLATER. 18C7. SI County aiid Town Accounts, for the Year 1867 2(5. M. Nash physician '•ii. B. (J. Budd ' do 28. Setli Adams do . 20. (J. D. Budd do 30. D. A. Stewart, county clerk 81. D. A. Stewart do ' do 32. I). A. Stewart trans, indices 33. Elislui Ciofoot, sheriff 34. CIIIIIICH E. Peebles, deputy sheriff 35. G. P. Eunies, do do 3ti. Charles E. Peebles, jailor 87. Abriiin I. Mereness, ilurk of the board of excise, 4o. 38. Charles l>. Adams, attorney :i». '•'. S. Merrell do 40. E. H. MIIITCII tit) 41. E, B. Merrell, judgment 42. E. S, Merrell do 43. Iledilen & Dodge, merchandise 44. Scotts k McCartey do 4fi. Rogers, McCartey*& Co. do 40. Charles A. Chicki ring, school commissioner 47. Willi am Adams, school commissioner 48. It, Sanford Miller, committee 4 It. W. W. Rice do 00. Benton & Andrews, blank books Bl. Benton St. Andrews. do do 62. Weed, Parsons ft Co. stationery 63. K, P, Murray do 64. M.J. Mitffn.y do 65. W. 0. Little, law books BIS. Sherman Phillips, repairs on clerk's oftidd 67, Jiicob I. Conk, lumber account 68. Conover & Miller, repairs on court housl BPi Solomon Phelps, reiit of Dam «(). Peter Kirley, building commlttcb 61. John Strong, coroner 62. J. P. Brownell, ooroncf 63. Milton Pease, going after cbrbllt! 1 64. Pllster & bayan, hardware Oh. Thomas McGrath, wood 6(1. 10. Botsford do 67. James MoCuflock, merchandise 68. Scott Bros., tubs for jail 69. Marcus B. Smith, panther bounty 70. Allen Parker, superintendent of the poor 71. William Hunt, services 72. Thomas Morrow, bear bounty 73. Seymour F. Adams, ox-district attorney 74. James E. N. Backus, printing 75. Alfred Arthur, commissioner of excise in 1866 76. Alfred Arthur, commissioner of excise 77. Jason Pavne do do 78. A. D. Wright do 7l>. Clinton A. Foster, justico 80. Henry 0. STopthani, ex-seliool commissioner 81. Abram I. Mereness, attorney 82. John Seigel, wood 83. Dr. F. Bisehoft', post riidrtem examination 84. William K. Wadsworth, illegal fees 86. John D. Bradbury, constable 86. Andrew S, Sears do 87. C. D. Lanpher, justice 88. Ilenrji-E. Turner, attorney 89. George W. Fowler, hardware 90. D. O. West & Co. merchandise 91. John Doig, do- 92. Carlos P, Scovil, printing 93. J. B. Paris, constable 94. (i. P. Eames, deputr sheriff 95. I. A. Stone, constable 96. Charles R.Stephens, constable 97. 0. A. Shepard do 98. Isaac Laquay, deputy sheriff 99. Dr. F. Bisohoff, surgical services for a county paupet 45 00 100. J. M.Carter, mason work 101. L. C. Hildreth, transportation and board 102. James Failing, cleaning jail 103. Charles S. Rice, building committee 104. Charles S. Rice, superintendent of the poor 105. Samuel P. Sears do do do 106. David Alger, do do do 107. George D. Brown, painting inside of the armory 108. A. II. Lee, justice lost, Charles E, Mitchell, clerk of the board of excise 110. AmasaS. Stoddard, merchandise 111. G. B. Johnson, building cummitiee 112. J. Mi d'trdiiei'i biliidlng committee 113. S. P. Uhlein, physician 114. DeWitt C. Finch, printing 115. C. D. Manville & Co., printing 1 In. Amos V. Smiley, printing 117. Harlow Clobridge, county canvassetf 118. James B. Phillips, deputy sheriff 119. Martin King, surveying jail limits, &o 120. Theodore Holmes, labor &e 121. James Failing, labor &c' 122. E. J. Arthur, labor kc 123. E. Thomas, constable 124. John A. Segovis, constable 125. M. Morgan, constable 126. V. R. Waters, committee' 127. Carlos P. Scovil, resolution 6T boiird 128. Executors of the late S. Miller, resolution of board 129. Jay A, Pease, excise committe and attorney 130. Thomas Carroll, rent of armory for Company G 181. Stephen Tilmbrit, relit of armory for Company F 132. Jay A. Pease, rent of armory for Company I 133. E,E. Sackett, rent ol armory for CohttWriy B 134. L. R. Hough, rent of armory for Company K 136. Charles D. Wilcox, rent of armory fdr Company 0 IRt): Sylvester D. Cook, guardduty 137. Anthony Bowdlsh, notifying dntfted men 138. E. B. Livingston, repairs On regiiiie'ntal armory 139. W. B. Sylvester, cleaning guns 140. n. M. Riggs, cleaning guns 141. Nelson Fcttcrly, cleaning guns 142. George Dies, armorer \ 143. Peter Le-vis, armorer 1866 and 1867 144-. John Chickering, justice 145. William R. Adams, stationery 146. Jay Dexter, sec proceedings this year 147. Linus Birdscv, supervisor 148. Levi Crofoot do 149. John Chickering do 150. Thomas Carroll do 151. Joseph M. Gardner do 1 152. Samuel F. Garmon do 153. William Hunt do 154. John Herrick do 155. Robert House it) 156. G. B.Johnson do' 157. Marion Nash do 158. Jay A. Pease do 159. Charles Plummer do 160. William Rowcll dd 161. William W. Riee do 162. Fmncia Seger do 163. Henry E. Turner do 164. Rufus L. Rogers, resolution of the bonrd 165. Rufus L. Rogers, resolution ol the board 166. John Conover, repairs on the court house , 167. Elbridgo R. Adams, resolution of the board 'ear 1867. looo 18 00 5 00 29 00 *9 37 752 67 600 UU 499 20 08 43 21 6S 735 44 37 00 20 00 28 00 60 01) 04 18 58 63 13 81 7 00 19 75 20i) 00 175 (JO 12 1)0 12 (10 50 00 181 Oi) 81 00 I'iO B^ 67' (1.1 00 8 60 19 10 52 45 30 00 (10 HO 43 00 T 85 3-00 15 44 97 62 20 00 1 63 10 00 5 00 sis no 46 02 6 00 20 25 26 70 30 00 30 00 30 00 36 00 17 65 25 00 S5 00 CO 00 15 00 13 37 12 90 3 50 5 73 45 00 281 23 60 17 4 08 13 71 18 95 10 00 25 60 99 72 8 80 34 28 C 45 00 3 00 13 00 20 00 41 00 67 00 StO 00 89 00 9 00 1 80 30 00 5 00 84 00 87 00 5 00 292 25 805 i0 903 30 6 76 228 79 11 00 14 oo 6 60 ss Ob 8 00 8 75 43 00 16 00 14 0(1 50 00 40 00 50 00 oo no 30 00 60 00 2 00 10 50 230 64 19 00 40 00 6 50 18 00 54 44 1 50 23 27 61 35 90 72 64 04 87 40 87\ 88 H 66 78 72 110 92 85 30 72 32 89 84 105 40 130 82 8S44 158 78 97 40 ?0 !10 83 00 300 00 30 84 10 00 13 00 6 00 29 00 20 02 752 67 600 00 499 26 6S 46 21 65 663 24 25 00 20 00 26 00 60 00 64 18 68 68 13 81 7 00 19 75 200 00 176 00 12 00 12 (ill 20 Ol) 181 Ol) 81 00 1 20 67 67 4(1 01) 3 50 19 10 44 20 80 00 86 00 43 (It) 7 35 8 oo 15 44 97 02 20 00 1 03 10 00 5 00 »u Ail 40 02 rejected 20 25 26 70 30 00 30 00 30 00 36 00 17 65 26 00 25 00 60 00 15 00 13 87 9 90 8 50 6 73 45 00 231 23 60 17 4 08 13 71 18 95- 10 00 23 60 94 92 7 30 SO 28 45 00 3 00 18 00 20 00 41 00 C7 00 96 00 89 00 9 00 1 80 SO 00 6 00 84 00 87 00 6 00 291 00 504 10 852 30 5 70 228 79 64 B0 14 00 5 60 2 00 6 00 •ejected. 43 00 16 00 27 90 5 56 38 00 50 00 35 00 40 00 GdOO 36 00 85 00 2 00 10 50 230 64 19 00 41 00 6 60 18 00 54 44 7 50 23 27 51 85 90 72 64 04 87 40 87 38 77 66 78 72 110 92 85 30 72 32 89 84 106 40 130 82 83 44 168 78 97 40 70 90 dido 800 00 80 84 700 00 SO 00 48. Gilbert Weatherhead, overtax 49. I). G. Bent, physician acet 5D. Louis N. Bisha, plunk &e 61. Henry Harbor, overtax 62. Zeph P Bonnot, plank ic ' 53. George Boliver, plank Ao 54. N. D. Ferguson, physielatl of). (3. D. Manville £ Co To supervisor •• • To supervisor, dog tax To commissioners of highways, roads and bridges To commissioners of higliwiu Sfi'on-rosidcut highway tax To county treasurer, viz: State tax • 890 80 Oou.itv tat.; 11. •. i s... i i: 2,701 00 Superintendents of the poor 161 33 Taxes reasssessed 901 77 4,714 90 Less balance in treasury 32 13 8 80 13 00 8 00 tw 2 00 1 00 40 00 1 50 $2 8 80 18 00 8 0U 0 90 2 00 1 00 •80 00 1 50 ,007 79 74 60 260 00 187 00 Aggregate to treasurer.. Amount of warrant. DENMARK. 4,682 77 *7,752 66 1. G. B. Johnson, surveyor and justico 2. .James Johnson, jui-tioo 3. Darwin Nash, justice and town clerk 4. P. Woulwouh, justice and clerk of election 0. William Hartwell, overseer of the poor 6. George ('bickering, ovei'aeer of the pttUr 7. Abucr Munger, commissioner of highways 8. J. 0. Otis, commissioner of highways 9. John W. Wright, commissioner of highways 10. Peter Bent, assessor 11. Elen G. Parsons, assessor and clerk of election 12. ChaHus Thompson, assussor 13. S. S. Otis, Inspector of election 14. Charles LoomiSj Inspector Of SIbctioii k 15. John Sylvester, inspector of olcetiotl 16. Luciau Clurkj Inspector of electidti 17. G. A. Scovil, instielHIII'df election 18. A. M. Rvel inspector of election 19. II. U. Ryel, clerk of election \ a 20. Addison L. Clark, clerk of election »•• \'\\lien Howard, clerk of election 22. John S. flitciieu, u~. -..KI 0 23. John D. Loud, poor account 24. Amos V. Smiley, printing 25. H. S Gfiswold, pool' account 20. Orrin Robbins, poor account 27, Thomas Carroll, use of house 28. W. C. Lawton, surveying 38 09 6 00 11 65 31 10 59 55 41 77 19 29 11 25 27 00 13 50 20 50 18 00 9 00 9 50 12 75 it) 75 9 f 5 1125 8 00 6 25 6 00 7 45 26 00 126 23 20 00 3 00 83 09 6 00 11 65 81 10 69 55 41 77 19 29 11 26 27 00 13 50 20 50 18 00 9 00 9 50 12 75 10 75 9 78 11 25 3 00 6 25 6 00 7 48 i4oo 4 oi; 26 00 15 00 20 00 8 00 To supervisor To supervisor, dog tax To commissioners of highways, roads and bridges To commissioners of highways, non res highway tax... To county treasurer, viz: State tax -... 5,053 22 County tax 18,662 40 Superintendents of the poor 871 20 Taxes reassessed 27 64 31,114 46 Less balance in treasury... i 66 90 Aggrcgate'to treasurer AtiWUilt of warrant '. DIANA. 1. George W. Hunt, inspector of electidti 2. Andrew H. Dutton, inspector of electidti 469 36 62 50 250 00 2 00 fil,04? 56 8. John I. Lasher, inspector of election 4. Alanson Caldwell, inspector of election 6. Orren P. Weeks, overseer of the poor 6. Clement C. Tooker, clerk of election 7. A. B. Ayers, inspector of election 8. Wilson Palmer, inspector of election 9. Alvin Unci, clerk of election tfco 10. John Hathaway, clerk of election 11. Leonard Peabody, clerk of election 12. Truman D.ivis, use of house 13. Howard Sterling, ex-supervisor and insp r of e!eo'n 14. Patrick Mulvany, inspector of electiom 15. Reuben L. Srolield, clerk of election 16. Benjamin ]>obson,-use of house 17. Jonathan Nit-hols, clerk of election 18. Lawrence Graltcn, Inspocttft 1 of eltStitWll 1st. John Dovle. assessor \ , 2ft. Joseph Cailiud, for coffin 21. Joseph Paihud, highway labor and surveying 22. Porter Graves, constable 23. O. P. Weeks, overseer of the poor 24. William Nunn, justice and carrying chain 25. .i*ipjjal W. Pike, highway labor 2(i. Howard Sterling, ovi>lseer : of the. jiddr 27. Heman Roberts, paid Fitzgorald's note Howard Sterling, highwaa labor 29. Thomas Broadway 30. Heman Roberts, overseer of the poor 81. Heman Roberts, overseer oi. the poor 32. Marquis Blancliard 33. Jeremiah Becker, justice and inspector of election 34. William Nunn, highway labor 33. William II. Hurlbert, highway labor 36. Titus Kinsmanj highway labor 37. POrter'(1ravcs,.higliiVtiy IdbBf 38. E. R. Paul, justice, highway labor, &c 39. N. R. Carley, justice, physician and sdrveying 40. Emerson Seymour] physician and surveying 41. Carl Proegher, physician 42. William Palmer, assessor 43. James A. Aldridge, assessor, and use of houBO 44. Henry Allen, town clerk 45. William Hunt, supervisor 46. Marquis Blancliard, commissioner's dote 47. D. D. Waggoner, insp of elfc and com'r dri bridge 48. C. D. Manville & Co, printing 49. John Nelson, overtax 60. N. B. Smith, overtax 51. J. S. Louis, overtax 42. J. Noyce, overtax To supervisor 1 ......... i..., To supervisor, dog tax To overseer of the poor To commissioners of highways, roads and bridges' To commissioners of highways, non res highway2\08O tax... ToLess county treasurer, viz : State tax i 888 71 County tax .: i..\...:.;; 1,204 80 Superintendents of the poor 4 60 Taxes reassessed 482 02 &09 •Hi 4 50 8 00 9 00 2 25 8 25 850 8 50 2 25 2 25 lo oo 18 50 10 00 4 50 .10 00 **25 ill 00 21 75 10 00 42 34 15 00 7 60 11 26 -67 00 49 00 60 00 28 89 47 00 18 76 10 00 17 50 14 10 15 60 15 00 J 2 00 H 00 36 65 49 00 15 00 9 00 18 75 41 90 26 85 22 SS 821 Od 15 10 1 60 Lowville, N. Y., Oct. 6, Marlinsburgh Town Sonds. COUPON BONDS OF THE TOWN OF MAR- tilifbtifgh, with interest payable semi annually, are readv for sale; und for thirty rinys, will be sold oiil'v lo inhabitants mid tax-payers of suit' town. Apply to either of the undersigned or to D. O. Wi s't at Lowville. Martint-bnrgh, June fi, 1867. CHESTEIt SHUMWAY. WM. GEORGE, AI FRED STILES, 3 t f ConimiMtmirr*. T.T0USE, SIGN it'l-'KKSCO I»AINTIN« AI*f> OUABNIN& In all their branches. Window Shades and Trimmings. Cloth shades for storep, offices and parlors, also Wire Shades for windows and doors made lo order, with let- tering or any device ,hci,m,. vi ^ MAN Sfivl No. 24 Bleeker St., Utica, N. Y. rpHK fF^rro TRADE-- X at STANFORD k LANPHERV. CROGLtAN. f 11)462 7Si ^Nicholas Vallin, commiss'r of highways and labor Nicholas Vallin, eominissioner, for services Nicholas Vallin, constable Augustus Wichman, labor on highways .. Augustus Wichman, assessor 6. William Spencer, inspector of election district No 2 7. Peter Back, justice 8. Charles Martin, liallot boxes 9. Matthias Martin, inspector of election district No 2 10. reter Hurras, inspector of election district No 2 11. Nonh Denesia inspector of election district No 2 \ 12. II. 1), Brown, overtax 13. Nicholas Vallin, carrying pauper to'oounty house 14. Michael Howard, asscsspr 15. K Slater, assessor 16. M. Mathews, overseer of the poor and disbursements 275 67 17. M. Mathews, overseer of the poor, services 18. John Mclntyre, inspector of election district No 1 A. W, Spatiiding, inspector of election district No 1 Thomas Barker, constable David Stewart, overtax Thomas Harvey, Jr commissioner of highways' Council & Hammond, provisions for poor Jacob Steinhilber, plank and labor Christopher Friekh irt, late overseer of the poor n. S. Itcndee, physician O. \. Hubbard do * A..A. Herriek, carrying pauper to the county house Peter Baker, overseer of the poor kc '30. Anna Ilaslin provisions for the poor 31, Joseph Rivet, provisions for the poor Michael Howard, overtax * August Meister, inspector of election district No 2 ft R. Hubbard, late constable - P. R. Iliiblincd, commisfionpr services Patrick J. BlilW, Iti'peetor of election district No 2 37, firorge Brmngnli, clerk of election 38. S. R. Hubbard, commissioner and disbursemetlti SO. Michael Summery, ti?c 6f hall 40, ,1. S. Bliss, justico 41. P. II Pnell, justico and surveyor J. P. Brownell justice and surveyor' M. J. Murray, stationery D. C. Finch,' rond warrants W. W. Rice, supervisor 46. A. V. Valin, town clerk &c 47. D. 0. Bent, clerk in election distriot No 1 19. 20. 21. 22, 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 32. 33. 34. 35 36. 42. 43. 44. 45. 642 87 78 00 11 45 39 (10 45 oo 2 50 9 00 6 00 12 50 12 50 12 50 88 37 6 00 49 00 46 50 275 67 37 50 10 00 5 00 25 28 7O0 135 15 ]0> 62 42 18 17 25 8 00 5 50 . 7 00 44 61 14 40 222 48 8 03 7 50 1776 85 75 10 00 14 75 250 26 12 00 24 70 24 50 82 50 JO 80 6 00 80 00 58 65 7 80 642 87 78 00 11 45 SO 00 49 00 2 50 9 00 6 00 12 5r> 12 80 IS 50 88 87 6 00 49 00 46 50 275 57 80 00 - 10 Oft 6 00 25 28 7 00 135 15 102 62 42 18 10 00 *& 00 6 6ft 7 00 44 64 14 40 222 48 3 93 7 r.o 1 5 ' . 76 10 00 14 76 250 25 1200 24 70 24 B0 82 60 10 80 BOO 80 00 56 68 7 80 21,831 42 9 00 2 25 . 4 60 , 9 00 9 00 2 25 8 25 8 60 8 60 2 25 2 25 id oo 13 60 10 00 4 50 10 00 « 26 iood 21 75 10 00 42 34 15 00 7 50 11 25 57 00 49 00 60 00 28 89 47 00 18 78 10 00 1? 80 14 10 15 50 15 00 12 00 2l do 36 65 49 00 15 00 9 00 18 7B 41 90 26 85 22 38 321 00 15 10 1 60 si it 2 70 iO 67 8 6f . ._ _ . - 1,188 46 64 00 160 00 800 00 444 60 03 166 12 balance in treasury Aggregate to treasurer Amowit of warrant GREIG, li,David L: Lovcjoy, Use of lftmse i. ii. P. Lo'vejoy, dotistabie II. R. P. Lovcjoy, inspector of election 4. Adam Sncll, use of house 5. L. W. Fiske, 6. John W. Holcomb, overseer of poor 7; Edward Hdfc'dlfiff; Overseer of the pb'b'f ff. Matthew E. Burdick, constable 9. Peter F. Sand, assessor 10. Allen Perkins, commissioner of highways 11. Kirtland Johnson, commissioner of highways 12. Joseph F. Jones, town clerk 13. David McConnell, overseer of poor 14. James C. Pullmin, corffrtiis.'ib'ner of highways 15. John LonnSj inspector of election 10. Arnold Slocum, assessor 17. William Seymour, justico and inspector of election 18. James Springstein, inspector and clerk of election 19. Joseph Fruin, inspector of election 20. Miles S. Rogers, clerk of election 21. Joseph Atkins, inspector of election 22. Nelson Hart, constable 23. Hiram Warren, justice 24.*ol:n D. Scraffoid, deputyconstablo 25. John C, Folon, attorney 20. Ambrose F. Cole, justico 27. James D. Smith, jnstic-s 23. Francis ScgCr, supervisee 29. D.O.'Fincli, printing 30. David Doniiniek 31. Suhoql-DistrtSt, No. 1 32. George S. Loomis, over tax «.. t,..^i!l. r>:c_„ .-- 2,018 91 $4,600 87 Martin Pifer, over ta* Francis Soger, to pay Lynn's noto to Whittlesey C. D. Manville & Co., priming' Id 00 10 75 7 50 6 50 28 00 1)4 69 18'00 48 45 19 50 12 00 38 50 35 49 49 08 10 50 7 50 23 25 12 50 4 50 9 00 4 50 11 00 43 95 4 50 fl ao 28 00 81 00 26 85 10 63 17 00 , 1 50 10 00 9 75 7 50 6 50 20 00 !)4 69 18 00 32 40 19 60 12 (10 38 50 35 49 44 95 10 60 7 60 23 25 12 50 4 60 9 00 4 50 11 00 18 30 4 50 3 29 10 00 81 00 20 35 10 03 10 00 . 80 OO . 8 00 8 2T 4 62 25 88 1 60 To supervisor i .• To overseer of the poor , To commissioners ofhighwuys, roads and bridged To commissioners of highways, non-res. highway tax.. To county treasurer, viz: State tax i 615 46 County tax 1,907 Off Superintendents of the. podf; 256 76 Taxes ieassi.sscd 849 89 $580 37 212 00 1,116 85 «87 75 Less balance in treasury. Aggregate to troasuror Ansountof warrant..,. 8,129 21 49 88 8.079 88 8,876 91 THE CITY OF NEW YOHK. Seven hundred und twenty-six thous- and htlmnn beings lie down to sloop on this little isltmd, and rise up to—cat.— And yet not one of them produces a gfnin of wheat or an ounce of food ; ihii'ty-i»i!»l)t thoilsand and Hlty'-six more families than males ; it follows that this number not only are not, but cannot bo married. Yet to oat and to love are the two controlling desires of man. Look- ing more closely wo discover, further, that four hundred and twenty-three thousand one hundred and twenty-one of the people are not married—more than one-half. It Kcems certain God intended us to oat and to love, and yet there its a pop- ulation of nigh a million, which Hud it exceedingly difficult to <3o either-in an honest or legitimate way. Why are these people in so peculiar and danger- our a position ? The answer is most complex, and no two persons would give the same. But the principal reason, is they do not wish to raise the fdod they eat; they prefer td Use their Wits rather than their hands. WOOD ASD DttlVK. Not only are they without food, but the water thev drink and waste Is brought through great pipes of mason- ry forty miles long, from the Croton river; and sixty millions of gallons a day comes potiritlg into the city, for which they pay annually about one million dollars money of the realm. Add to this the interest dn the cOst Of the works (i5o,000,000) and we lie... O... ..t\at /%f iiMitur. rw»n yai.iv alw.tit three millions of dollars. This is not all; some seven thousand licensed grog shops dispense every drink known to man, except water-^and iit what coat ? This is hot easy to say exactly ; but as there are tliree tililliou gallons of whis- ky brought to the city yearly, and as there are imported into it wines, bran- dies, rums, cordials, <tec, <fcc, to the amount of 10,092,000; teas to the amount of $11,110,623; coffee to the amount of f lu,?o2,.1fil J it follows itiat this people do not go dry. The figures show that one fifth of all our imports are of this luxurious character. fiafiNG, is a fearful thing, and is becoming fear- fully difficult; and yet every one ol those seven hundred und twenty-six thousand (with exceptions) has ilti im p'icit faith that food is coining into his or her inoiuh'dnily, while they produce no eatable thing. Such faith is a mir- acle I Wheat and flour are grown and made in Genesee and Minesota and Missouri, and Maryland; and four million barrels of floni, and nine million bushels of wheat getto the city of NewYork ever} yenr.tjind moreover, there is not sin ox in Texas, a hog in Illinois, a grouse in Wisconsin, a srtielt ih Maine, a pota- Uto anywhere, which may not arrive at the felicity of being devoured by one of the great mob ot citizens whose chief happiness it is to live in New York city. By a vast combinatldn of force and genius this food is got from all quar- ters of the earth, and is pat into the mouths of tltese New Yorkers every day; tilling them with strength and life; and yet most of thetn hold it to bo no miracle at all I WHEUK IT COMBS FKOit. How does ail this food get there ?— Ah, that is a question I In Europe they used to say, 'All roads lead to Rome.' rfore We say, 'All roads lead to New York.' Thirty-two thousand miles of iron rails stretch out over the com I nent, frUm the piney woods of Maine to the golden hills of Colorado, itncl on them, night and day—night and day, in storm, in sunshinf, in heat) and cold— the iron horSe drags his monstrous loads, all of which centre in New York. Then from the beautiful bays and riv- ers of all New linclano, rrom «u i|,p shores dt the Atlantic, edine out sloops, and schooners, and ships with snowy sails, which the good wind blows to New York, and upon every 'raging ca nal' dull old boats, with capacious iu- sides, slowly but certainly float to New York. MARKETS. Washington and Fulton mirkets are disgraceful spots, certainly ; but they are the great distributing centres for the food of the city. From the hour of three in the morning until the shade's of evening hide their filth under its darkness, a throng of carts, wagons and trucks, 'crush and Collide, and swear, until they get rtt tilis food ; which they then whirl nway for the breakfasts and dinners of those count- less thousands. And this is whatgoi'S on every day irt the year. iiaVr is IT PAID FOR ? l'his is another vast alid ftiysterlUns question. Remember that the smartest men and women get to great cities, and that their dexterity is great; that they are inspired with a profound and persistent desire to get other people's money. Eleven hundred different trados, professions, or occupations, ap- pear in the Business Directory; all of which go to make up a decent average tnnh or-woman of New York. The world has moved very far from Father Abraham—has it' improved ? These professions range from .Tndggs on the bench, to vermin-exterminators; from great publishers to masonic emblem- makers) of whom there is—one. Prink- ing is the fll'stj and foremost, Md most vivacious i In the wine and liquor business are;... 3,950 Grocers 2,950 Butchers .' 1,300 Bankers, about ........;; 650 Lawyers, about 2,000 Tailors, about....; 1,000 Hair-dres-<ers, sonic, 550 Gqual in numbers, th'e clergy 650 But there are two classes who we will venture to mention, who seem an integral part of modern society. There are some fifteen hundred professional TlljftVKS in the city. These men eat,- and in some cases grow rich. A retired thief, named Fox, died within a short time in Brooklyn, and one i* ndw living in the city, both ot whom amassad for- tunes of $40,000 or 170,000. It item* &&2ssi to bo a good business, and the men en gaged in it nro very capable. It is easy to see how they pay for their foodi THK liEKdliAtff dominates all. To-day he is the prince of York. Time was when the great lawyer remained in his office in digni find seclusion, when science or learning dominated trade, tiuij to-day, lawyer, doctdfj proftSssor; pYealiher, artist, bow before the merchant. He controls mon- ey and dispenses patronage. Sitting in a dismal counting-room of South street, he sends his ships to the farthest cities, he brings hence the goods or the lux- uries of the world. Ho iriukes New York in a vast bassaar or market, where all may and do come to buy and still. t)hly fifteen thousand pel'sons occu- py a whole house, and 480,880 live in tenement houses, of thefce, 15,214 live or rather rot, in cellars. They are THE UNDBRGBOUND TKIBH, —perhaps, outcasts—enough to make a large city I And further,\52 out- ot-iloor poor were relieved by lilsai'ity in the year 1805. RELIGION. We see how merchants, manufactur- ers thieves, <fec, win their broad. The three 'learned professions' live bv try nig to cure or alleviate the miseries men inflict on themselves or bn one an- other; l'llcy are entitled to fair wa- ges for doing this, and to our profound- est thanks. A lew lawyers—a very few—have imwrnea of ffdin twenty to fifty thdUsatid dollars ; but to get these they have worked years, have sacrific- ed onj'fymun:, have shortened their lives. The greater ndiHber secure some- thing between one and throe thousand dollars. Physicians get nearly the same, though the extremes are not so great. The clergy are paid from $2,- 000 to $8,000 a year, and dtl the whole live well, fiut they fall to enjoy, such, a measure of health as sd serene an oc- cupation should secure. In a commer- cial city like this, a class of men who do not attempt to 'make money,' whose lives are reflective rather than active, whose thoughts are of another world Father thaii this, might easily be un- dervalued, if not despised. That the)' are not, speaks well for them, and well f'of the [leOple; it would seem to Bhow that God is not God--not yet I The wit'y Frenchman has said : 'In America they have invented two hun- dred religions and only one gravy!'— We have in New York three hundred and fifty three churches, nearly every sect known . to civilized man. The avoragc members in fiditto nve of the 1 cad Dig sects is 320; which seems to show a religious population ot but 112,960 persons. These, howevct'i rep- resent families and pop'tiiattdn df pro- bably some 224,774, which, however, is only about one-foiirth ot all. .It has been stated that the religious destitu- tion of New York is greater than that of Pekin j yet the jirbitieni of how to tndtice people to go ttt.clluriih has i.ot bctiii BttlvUd here. The richest and leading sect in the city has seats for 110,750\. but has an average attendance of only 28,750. This seems .to show not that we want churches but people to go in them. The material masters the spiritual here also, and the great, worldly prizes are not in the church. Where) then;do we look for the great, strong) woridly men ? Certainly not in the churcli— certainly not itl the ranks of those who follow a meek and lowly Master. In- deed, the meek and Idwly men do not abound in a large city—hot in Ameri- ca atleasi. TIIE MEN, (who are ambitious and! moan lo win, and who never give it up) wear a bold, adventurous air; they dress well, eat well and spend money freely, when they have it. Their grasp is powerful; they do not fear to undertake great enterprises, or to incur any amount of \•••\prttisibilityi When thev fail—and they almost all <1o fail—they get up and try again, or—they go to the doss. They are not troubled with diffidence or conscience, and ambition dominates soul. They love great houses, and fine upholstery^ and fast horses, because these are the mititst.-.mp of success; but about art, dr literature, ot- science) they know little, though some few are beginning to believe \there may be something in them, though just what it is, is quite vague. If they have any idea except lo be millionaries, it is to combine in some waV Cash and Chris- tianity, and thus produce a cross be- tween 8t. Francis Xuvier and Commo- dore Vanderbilt. So far it has not been done. The great men no longer seek in po 1 - itios, literature, rtl't, or science a field for the greatest talent. No prizes ttf'C comparable to those which commerce offers, and railways issue, and; we must look for the greatest grasp among the Comings and the Stewarts, the Forbes and lite Lows—the Vandcrbills and the Ogdcns of to-day. TUB WOMB* are not unlike the men—handsome, stylish,eourageous, and somewhat reck- less. They Jove clothes, and jewels, and operas, and 'society ;' but no one chooses lo remain in lief own cit-clf) dr anionjt hef ottn people so long as there is a class or a society which seems to bo above lief. She is therefore reck- less atld racked. She fears the frown of Mrs. Grundy, and must live in the cnt'tlauted region hounded by Madison scJHarp, FVuftli and BiJilt ttvenup.j be- yond tliit is oulef darkness. Within this limit the rents range from two to ten thousand a year, and lite is sealed up to that expenditure. How it is done, how people who have ipcomes of four thousand a year manage to spend fifteen, no one tells. It is a secret, but it is done. The woman of the 'best society' lias nothing to do but spend moncyj stftd she does nothing else ; she is absolute ly without occupation, except the'busi- ness of 'society.' She skows a little French, a little German, a little muYip., a little poetry, a very little honspkeep ing, and a vast deal of dross.- But of herself, of the rclaliins of mind and body, of the laws of heaUly—diet, air, eneroisa—of maternal dutie», of tbt natural sciences, absolutely nothing.— And yet her education has ooit from a thousand to fifteen hundred dollars a year. , • * I have alluded to maternal d tititte, r «o little are they understood or appre- ciated—as I learn upon competent au- thority—that large numbers of the best families find relief from them in tlld services of skilled experts—one of whom lives in one of the most superb mansions of the city, and haa amassed a fortune of half n million. 'Society' is constantly shifting—it ia a kaleidosoope. Pew, >T any, of. the leaders of ten years ago remain ; all are gone—gone, and none know whith- er, or care. 'Society' is too eager, too busy, to stop and drop a tear upon rit- inod fortunes or blasted hopes. 'Lei the dead bury their dead' is the motto; MAItUIAQE is becoming more and more difficulty if not impossible; and its contrary rilbra and more common. The streets ard thronged with beautiful girls lovely as penoh -lilows; but they desire to begin life with all the elegance and expendi- tures to which their mothers hav.pus^d them ; and . as men do not exist with purses long enough to marry them, ar*i as there is no market to which they can be carried, the prospect is poor. The other extreme, the opposite and complement of the 'best society,' is to be found in Water and Cherry streets; where men, women and children orowd into reeking cellars and holes of the earth ; without fire, without food, with- out beds, without hope of man or God ! Fil'toen thousand of this class! Be- tween these extremes come the great body of common people, who live de- cently, eat well, work hard, and secure a lair measure of worldly comfort; THIS CHILDREN, 200,000 of them—have the hardest of it in this great city. Shut up in hous- es and narrow yards, they can neither shout, nor run, nor climb, as they dd in country pastures and leafy woods J their lungs are never filled with sweet smelling air; they never catch fish, or find birds' nests, or seek wild flowers, or build hilts, or make gardens. How- can they, then, have that natural, free', healthy, full development which makes; great men and women ? What is the consequence ? Wo see it, in that great cities go to decay when the fresh blood of tho pastures does not flow into theinj we see it in tile spare babies, and pillej faces, /ind weakened digestions, and sensitive nerves of city children; and We see it in the awful mortality which sends one-half of them to the grave be- fore they reach tho age of five years.— It is so among the best, of i,hem—with those who live in good 1 o lses, who eat good food, and have tender parents.— How is it with those who have none of these, whd are iieglocted, wretched} and ill-treated, from die day they are born ? Thirty thousand of this kind, between the ages of five and twelve, exist in this city i and sixty thousand of all 1 A significant fact—rather: *fr»«*^ — Colors Maddening Animals. What reaso'n Oan then be assigned for tho well-known fact that rod, morji than any other color, excites many ani- mals to the highest point of despera- tion ? Many persons have unquestiona-. ably lost their lives in consequence of wearing articles* of dress which provok- ed domesticated animals to such a pitch of fury as to lead to melancholy resuksi Females, for example, in attempting to\ crOss a pasture, Weariilg a red covoririg for the head, a scarlet dress, or flowing scarlet ribbons, where bulls are grazing' hazard their lives. Oxen, otherwise peaceably disposed, become intensely infuriated at some seasons by the sight of bright-red handkerchiefs, or almost any article of female dress of that partic- ular hue. It is equally curious that turkeys manifest the same restlessness and ultimate excitement at red flags or rod dresses. The turkeys cock on such occasions assumes extraordinary digni- ty gobbling rriosL uproariously,and crc- 1 ating immense excitmeiit in his family, not accustomed to the sight. Nearly all the wild grazing animals exhibit ex- treme surprise, it not positive frighj^ when a red cloth floats before them. Perhaps the carnivorous quadrupeds feel the same annoyance under lite cir- cumstances ; but at all events, as ii cause for all tnrbulmice has not been satisfactorily explained, it is always safe not to provoke the ire of animals which are thus affected. . To PREVENT CATTLE t-iiost JUMPING P'sNtjES.—The following singular state- ment was made at a late meeting of the American Institute Farmer's Club at New York: To prevent steers from jumping fen« ces, clip off the eye lashes of the tlfidor lids with a scisSors, and the ability or disposition to jump is as effectually lost as Sampson's power was lost by his locks. The animal will not attempt rt fence until the eye lashes are grovWl out again. Of this we are informed by Samuel Thome, the great breeder of Dutchess county, who assured us that he had tested it upon a pair of very breachy oxen. As it was ot'greitl val- ue to him, he hopes it will he tried by others/ -««*«^ —The language,of the sole—creaking boots. —What grows the less tired the tfldfe it works ? A wagon wheel. —Why is a kiss like tho creation of the world ? Because it is all very good*.' —Why is an unwelcome visitor like a shady tree ? Because we are glad whdn he leaves. —What is the difference between a watchmaker and a jailer ? One sells watches and tho other watches cells. —Why was Eve not afraid of the measles? Because she'd Adam (had 'em.) • —When did the ancient Greeks find it profitable to plough tho ocean ? In the days of Cecrops. —How were Adam and Eve pre^ehi- cd from gambling ? Their pair o' dice was taken away from them. —A French writer on gastronomicul subjects has defined indigestion .to\ W \the ingratitude of the stomach-\ —It is an old proverb that boys will be boys.\ What a pity it isn't equally a'S true that men will be men. —\The ocean speaks eloquently and forever,\ says Becchor. \Yesj\ retort* Prentico; .\There is\ rid use ih telling it to dry up.\ —In reply to a paper which OmhA Genoral Shcrrcfan tire \coming man,\ a Georgia journal pettishly says it hopes Ifo is fieff.\ fb'rfling that way again. \£Jo you like codfi-h balls, lilr/ ging ?\ Mr. Whlgging (hesitating- ly)—\I really don't kndw miss; 1 don't know, miss j I don't reidllect attend' teg oiler tfffcg 1&i

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