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The chronicle. (Mount Vernon, N.Y.) 1869-1898, May 20, 1898, Image 1

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THE CHRONICLE. Whole No. 1846. MOUNT VERNON, N. Y., FRIDAY NOON. MAY 20. 1898. Price, Two Cents. ^ O O U V C F U E T E 'W E E T g L I - > ' 3 r F L E ' V I E ' W O F .A.31^'1-. I - . O O A 3 1 j K T E ’W ^ S . W E T E S T T H E E Y E . TAKE CARE OF THE EYES. It repays to a greater degree than any other feature of personal health. Costs you nothing to visit J. F. JARVIS & SON No. 64 South Fourth Avenue, and be advised. The fallacy of the day Is that the services of an ex­ pensive oculist are necessary. Don’t pay their exhorbi- tant charges* It is only necessary (except in rare cases) to go direct to an experienced and reliable glasses AT JARVIS' Abundant testimony as to our efficiency from re­ lieved and delighted patrons, for your edification. HITTI8G THE MARK .... Established 1853. % magazines are weii miea ana , to keep our powder dry, and prices if it takes all summer, . „ , I j Don’t let the grass gro w under your feet, especially when you can get a 8000 lawn mower from $2.00 to $3.00, according to size. ■— ^These are not the worthless sort frequently offered but will give good service. Better grades $5.00^up. All Progressive Housekeepers Are interested In impro^d cooking contrivances. The latest and best thing in this line is the P u r itan VVickless Blue F lam e S tove—Burns kerosene without a wick, and mah-pg a blue flame the same as gas or gasoline, without smoke or odor. Can be seen in operation at our store. We have lota of other good things for light­ ening and expediting household labor which you ought at least to' know about— and which we shall be most happy to show you. „ Agents for “ R a m b ler,” “ Iver J o h n s o n ,” “ Keating,” “W averly” and “ Ideal” Bicycles $25 to $60, Boys and Girls Wheels $17.50 to $85. All fully guaranteed. Bargains in second band wheels. It will pay you to see us before Now is the best time to have your wheel cleaned, examined and, if necessary, repaired. We do this kind of work in the most careful manner. Agents for Doolittle Bicycle B rake and “Compton” Automatic Tire Inflator. We Also Repair Roofs, Leaders, Stoves, Furnaces, &c. Ball B e a r in g Lawn Mowers are the latest. Ask to see them, Refrigerators, Poultry Netting and Garden Tools of all kinds. Close 6.30. ------ -Saturdays 9.30 P. Tl. - The municipal election in this city on Tuesday was the source of keen disap­ pointment to the Republicans and an occasion of ’great rejoicing for the Dem­ ocrats. Their victory was so over­ whelming that it came as a surprise to even the most sanguine of them. The more conservative of Mr. Fiske’s adherents predicted his election at from 50 to 100 majority while|the more enthu­ siastic placed it at from 300 to 400. The majority of 871 was therefore a matter of astonishment to all. Two years ago Mayor Fiske’s majority was 505. At that time the total vo1;e was 3,255 At this election the total was 3,338. It may be interesting to compare the vote of the two elections. 1896. 1898. Ward, District, Archer-Ffske,- Reid-Fiske. First.........First...............W 156 346 ,171 “ ......... S e c o n d .....n o 177 119 186 Secon d ....F irst........180 190 161 191 “ ........ Second ........ 101 314 130 198 Third ....... First .............. 134 353 91 157 “ ........ Second ........ 134 141 153 135 Fourth....First..............114 208 97 235 “ ...... Second ........ 112 '187 106 189 “ ....T h ird ............ 103 376 319 380 \ ^ i f t h ................................ 231 158 203 244 Outside of the arrests elsewhere re­ ferred to there were no especial incidents to mark the day. The Australian ballot was used and the very few defective ballots show that this method of voting was readily comprehended by the voters. It was in marked contrast to the ma­ chines in the matter of counting, and it was after midnight before some of the districts were ready to announce the complete result. The Chronicle surpassed all its com­ petitors in the way of receiving returns. These were posted in Frank R. Taylor’s window and were received at frequent intervals directly from all the districts. The avenue in front of the Chronicle Building was soon crowded with an in­ terested throng. It wasn’t the pRasant- est kind of work to post such disheart\ Hiss Queen Claison’s BirtMay Party. Miss Queen Clawson of 1 Willow Place, Chester Hill, celebrated her eleventh birthday on Saturday last, by inviting a few of her many friends to a patriotic party from three until seven o’clock. I |The parlors and dining room, as well as the veranda, were decorated with American and Cuban flags .and the souvenirs were miniature regulation knap-sacks filled with bon-bons. The girls had a fine time singing patriotic songs and indulging in games both in the house and on the lawn, one of the features being the “dude party” which was much enjoyed. During the after­ noon Mr. Douglass Clawson grouped the girls on’the porch and succeeded in get­ ting an excellent picture of them which he will send to each one as a memento of the jolly occasion. Mildred Hill, Ethel Stoney, Shirley Bangs, Jessie Perry, Grace Cooley, Grace Whitney, Bertha, Marie and Grace Cottrell, Sudie Dickinson, Bessie Jenkins and Deanie Archer made up the party. Refresh­ ments were served from five to six o’clock. Goo4 Coal Means Good Heat and ‘Good: Cooking. Bad Coal Means Spoiled Dinners. You can get the former and all that it implies from ................ Yan Horson & Beitine. DEALERS IN ' Lehigh and Wilkes Barre Goal, o f f i c e : No. 10 W est First Street. P . O . B O X 1 4 3 . Y A R D , 1 6 6 E A S T F I R S T ST R E E T Office and yard connected by telephone, Inauring prompt deltreiy. Plug Raisiflg at Hartmann’s. Hartmann Bros’ woodworking estab- Hshment on West Lincoln avenue was the scene of a patriotic demonstration last Friday evening, it being in thb nature of a flag raising which not only displayed loyalty to Country but also exhibited a very gratifying co-operation between employers and employees. The latter presented the flag to the firm which was a handsome 13x20 piece of bunting, it having been purchased by Mr. G. H. LaBagh who with Messrs. G. H. Kapp, A. S. McLeod and W.G. Had­ den formed the committee of arrange­ ments. They set out to make a memorable time of it and they well succeeded. The Mount Vernon Band furnished! in­ spiring music in which it was assisted by the Wakefield Drum and Fife Corps. The Messrs. Hartman Bros, were not to be outdone by the generosity and patriotism of their employees and they had had erected a flag pole on the water tower from which “Old Glory,” can be seen from far and near. The unfurling of the flag was witnessed by 300 people and the playing of the “Star Spangled Banner’? was the signal for unbounded enthusiasm. Following this demonstration, Mr. J^ohn Har|mann aob^ptipTO ^ fey happy remarks which he concluded by inviting all the employees of the firm to “Friend Weitemeiers” where they were entertained in generous style. Hosical Society’s Prosperity. The annual meeting of the Mount Ver­ non Musical Society was held Tuesday evening in Ferguson Hall. The reports of the various officers were most gratifying, especially that of the treasurer which showed a balance of $125. in the treasury. . ’ A pleasant feature of the meeting: was the presentation of a Standard Dic­ tionary in two volumes to the society’ president, Hon. Edson Lbwis, which came as a complete surpris^. FISKE WINS MK He Will Continue jfcp Be Mayor of Mount Vernon For the Next Two Years. enfng news for Republicans, but The Chronicle had promised to give the. re­ turns and it did, and gave them correct. At 11.30 a bulletin was posted announc­ ing Mr. Fiske’s majority as 671 and this figure was the same as announced in the official canvass at the Board of Aider- men Wednesday night. Below will be found the returns in tab­ ulated form. , Scbool Appropriations Carried. The propositions to appropriate $25,000 for a .new school building in the First ward and $25,000 for a new building in the Second ward were both carried, the former by a majority of 826 and the lat­ ter by 810. A large number of voters evidently did not understand how to mark the ballots, for in the returns, 574 ballots are classified as blank, defaced, void, rejected or mutilated. Appended below is the vote in detail: 825,000 for Build­ ing in the First Ward. Ward. Dis. F or Against.' First F i r s t .. 141 38 “ Second. 199 32 Second First. 186 66 “ Second. 102 49 Third First. 96 44 *• Second. 156 53 Fourth First, 76 52 “ Second. 107 42 “ Third. 76 52 F ifth ............. 212 97 825,000 for Build­ ing in the Sec­ ond Ward. For Against. 112 36 T o tal.............1351 Majority ....... 826 3381 471 810 l&e ildermanlc Ball Team. In-the game of base ball between the aldermen of Mount Vernon and Yonkers to be played in this city on Decoration Day for the benefit of the Young Men’s Christian Association, the Mount Ver­ non officials will line up as follows: Mayor E. W. Fiske ........................... first base Alderman Samuel Fiske........center field “ A. W. Wallander.. second base “ S. W. Cowan......................left field “ E. Anderberg .......... right field “ A. A. Ultcht . . ........ third base “ W, D. Howe ........... short stop “ J. A. Cline ................. catcher City Clerk W. N. Hoyt ............... pitcher THE BATTLE OF CARDENAS. The First American Fatalities De­ scribed by One of the Parti­ cipants in the Fight, To the Misses Andrews, The Chronicle is indebted for the following letter which graphically describes the battle of Cardenas. It is written by John Klinger of New York to his father and gives a Tivid idea of the horrors of real warfare.’ Mr. Klinger is still in his teens arid is what is known in naval parlance as a “powder monkey” on the gunboai Wil­ mington. ' *, 1 He was formerly a student at the Misses Andrews’ School in NeW York. The fact that the letter was not writ­ ten for publication and is an off-hand pen and.ink narrative from son to father, makes it all the more interesting. O f f C a r d e n a s , C u b a , May 12th, 1898. DEAR P a p a — We bombarded this place May 11th and had a very rough.time. We had two or three of the‘batteries, ashore, and several gunboats, return fire. Our vessels were the Winslow (torpedo boat), Hudson, (Mosquito Fleet) and the Wil­ mington. The tug only had 2 '6-pounders We could not go in the proper chan­ nel because it was mined, and as we only draw nine feet of water we took another entrance, and I think the people were surprised to see us coming in the way we did. The torpedo boat fired the first shot,which was answered by the fort. As soon as she fired, we all clapped, for that’s what .we wanted. As soon as she opened fire, we did the same. There must have been lots of lives lost, by the way our shots were going in. The Machias was outside ready to stop any thing coming out. She could not get in, as she drew 12 feet and the deep­ est place was (i’ less 2) 10 feet. We were hit several times and were aground several times, but our captain knew his business. We kept on going from port to starboard and it sort of rattled the men on shore. We kept up a good fire THE CITY VOTE IN DETAIL. /-FIRST ■WARD-vr-SECOND WARD-v-THIRD WARD-^z-FOURTH WARD-. r-FIFTH WARD~»^TOT-.r-MAJ- . when we told them what happened, you could see that they were sorry. This morning the Winslow came along side, and said she was fixed up enough, to renew the attack. They insisted on it. You sh6uld have heard us cheer- her. I tell you that you don’t know when you are going. Just before we went-in, the Winslow came alongside and all hands were on deck, as happy as could be. Two hours later some of them had passed away. Shot and shell were fly­ ing around us, and you bet I done my share of passing up ammunition for the big guns.. It was warm work but I stuck to it, and had the satisfaction of coming up- on deck and seeing the place in flames, but the wounds on these men I can never forget. Oh, when I think of it f The Machias and Winslow have left for Key West. The Hudson left last night with the bodies. May 11th, 1898, was a bad day for the U. S. S. Wilmington. Most of us can­ not hear. The shots were fired in such rapidity that we are almost deaf. The least sound makes us start, after what we went through yesterday. We had lots of fun at Havana, but.I’ll tell you, this was no fun. We fought at least two hours. The Winslow was like a pep­ per box. What I say here, I mean. I am no coward, but for quite awhile my courage failed me. You cannot realize what war is, when you hear and see the shots strike. No one on the Wilmington was hurt and we only can say it was God’s will. I am not chicken-hearted, but when my mind wanders back to those poor unfortunates, I shudder. This is our real battle. I will put this in our ship’s letter box as soon as it is finished, and up to the present time am well, (4.35 P. M.) but after what happened yesterday, one can not be too certain. Love to all—and “Remember the Maine.” Your loving son, J o h n . We went in and got more than we ex­ pected; so did those on shore. MAYOR. Edwin W. Fiske, D ..................... W alter C. Reid, R ........................ Arthur I. Perry, P ....................... RECEIVER OF TAXES, John H, Brett, D ........................... W illiam J. Fee, R ........................ James W ilkinson, P .................... CITY TREASURER. H. B. Pruser, D.............................. James L. Warren, R .................... Neason Jones, P ............ ............... ASSESSOR. Louis Hagmann, D ....................... Charles H. Weiss, R....... . ...... Orison Dickinson, P ........... .. . . . JUSTICE OF THE PEACE. ' Robert D. Paskett, D .................. 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 3 1 171 146 186 119 191 198 m 157 91 135 153 235 97 189 106 2 280 ■ ^^4 244. 203. 5 ^77 140 4 180 134 6 183 166 181 134 3 146 m 138 148 3 173 161 6. 364 131 . 2 236 163 3 239. 208. 4 143 175 5 158 146 177 17| 162 153 m 133 5 122 163 3 190 134 •162 133 2 233 160 232. 213. 3 161 154 173 139 5 169 180 4 161 153 130 113 4 116 170 3 192 138 160 133 3 m 191. 251. 160 158 166 188 5 . 160- 189 171 146 3 136 106 3 124 160 4 213 118 7 173 131 254 140 212. 229. 7 ...1817... ...1474 39 ...1700... ...1670 44 ..1687.. ..1585 40 ....... 1769....264 .... ALDERMEN . AND SUPERVISORS. ALDERMEN. FIRST WARD. 1st Dist. .. . 149 ... 166 6 Gustavus Kessler, R ............... . .............. W. A. Roedel, D ..................................... W. R. Walker, P .................................... Roedel’s Majority ........................................ SECOND WARD. S. W. Cowan, R ...... ............................................ 172 E. T. Hayward, D................................................. 176 N. Le Page, P ....... * . ........... . ........ . .................... 5 Hayward’s Majority .................... . ............. 2d Dist. 3d Dist, 127 178 ----- 4 ----- .............. 68. I THIRD WARD. J. G. Hermes, R ....... . ........................................... 115 W. Bantz, .D ......................................................... 126 EliTrott, P ......... . ............................... 6 Hermes’ Majority........................................ Total. 276 344 10 303 358 8 280 250 8 30. F. P. Crastd, R....':*!............................................ 116 W. D. Grant. D ..,.i. ............ . .............................. 213 J. F. Eberhard, P ..,* .................... . .............. . ...... 6 Grant’s Majority.......................................... FIFTH 'WARD. Samuel Fiske, R .................................................... 214 J. D. Connor, D ............. 230 W. H. Bradbeer, P .................... : ......................... 5 . Connor's Majority....................................... \ . SUPERVISORS. , ^ , FIRST WARD,' Charles F. Bruning, R ................ 143 Edward W. Storms, D . . .................................. ‘ - 174 W. Hoiderness, P .................................................. 5 Storms’ Majority .......................... . ............. SECOND WARD. Frederick Mager, R ....................................... 167 Stephen Van Tassell, D . . . ............................ . 184 R, F. Washburn; P ................... . ...................... 3 Van Tassell’s Majority ................................ V THIRD WARD. Charles C. Bigelow, R.......................................... 117 John Emmeluth, D.......................... 124 Allen McLean, P. f ..... . .............. 4 Bigelow’s Majority ......................... ............. FOURTH WARD. 120 208 3 251. 350 601 11 214 230 5 253 367 12 288 379 6 277 250 7 FIFTH WARD. 248 Edgar K. Brown, R . .. . ....................... . ........... H. J. Ap^l, Jr., D ......... . .................................... 195 Eugene Thwing, P ........................ . ..................... 5 Brown’s Majority......... .............. 'S3, on them, -sunk’ the boats (so we think) and silenced the forts, not until they had done lots of damage on our side. We go in again, and are going to get square. One four-inch shell from the battery, carried the Winslow’s steering gear away and she was helpless. She was hit several times after that and seven or eight of her men were congre­ gated around her decks, and Ensign Bag- ley was running around giving instruc­ tions as to how the engines should be worked to get her out of the range of the fort’s guns. There were 10 gallons of green paint standing forsvard. A shell hit that and scattered it, then it burst and killed three men outright and wounded five. Two of the wounded were brought aboaid this ship where they died later. That made five dead. Ensign Bagley had a piece of shell hit him in the hack, and it came through, carrying his intestines,' stomach and in fact his whole insides along. I have seen some hard sights, but these young fellows were shot fearful. . One fellow had his-leg shot off, just at the knee, another his two heels. One was shot in the hip and it come up and car­ ried ;aw%^pa|i^ot his 'ba<^4bne. it was terrible! He died game. Just before he died he said, “This is tough work, boys.” The doctor gave him a morphine injection. He asked the doc­ tor what it was and he told him; he said^ “Give me some more, that’s bully.” The other fellow had his bowels and part of his hip carried away. He also died on our ship. Ensign Bagley was put on the half deck and an American Jack wrapped around him. The other two were left on the torpedo boat, and later transferred to the Hudson, to be taken to Key West. The lieutenant-com­ mander was also, hurt—that left the crew without a commander. When our doctor went on board, he said, “Help the boys first. I’ll look out for myself,” and he did. Wo anchored and .the Ma­ chias cheered us, for our work done, but Tbe War Subscription Boob. The war subscription book which the Women’s Auxiliary of the Y. M. C. A. decided to start in response to an appeal from the International Committee, for a special , fund of |5,000 to carry ojQ,.th^r work in'the State camps, is now ready. The book will be open to-morrow (Sat-. urday) afternoon and evening in the rooms of the Y. M. C. A. Building on South Fourth avenue where a commit­ tee of ladies will be present to receive ail subscriptions. A u x i l i a r y R e p o r t e r . * Women Invited to Mass Meeting. All the women of Mount Vernon, who are interested in the welfare of the brave men who have left their homes and dear ones tO battle for their country, are invited to attend a mass meeting at Willard Hall on Monday, May 23d, at 3 o’clock. This meeting is called to devise ways and means, by organized effort, whereby women can do whatever lie s in th e ir p o w e r to relieve and aid tbe United States’ troops during the war with Spain. It is hoped there will be a large at tendance, and that the women will come prepared to express their views as well as give this movement their hearty sup­ port. It is not to be the work of any one body of women, but for evev^ woman who is anxious and willing to do, her part in this hour of the Country’s great need. The movement has the endorsement of the clergy of the city and Mayor Fiske will preside. Westcbestei Woman’s Clnb. The members and guests of the Club w ere entertained by th e A rt S ection on W ednesday. Much credit is due the chairm an, Mrs. T. C. W a tson, and her com m ittee, for the finished representa­ tion of the pictures and statuary, in th e ttving re-productions g iven. The m u sic added m u ch to the pleasure of the occa­ sion. pro gr am m e . TneFat'es” ......... . ............... by Paul Thumann “Priscilla,” .................... by Elizabeth Gardiner- Music—Duet. ........... . . .Mrs. M. D. Stiles and Mrs. J. S. Wood. Impressionist sketch—“Spring” ...... by Watson Yestal Virgin- Soprano Solo,,. ..................... Mrs. M. D. Stiles Statuary—“Diana, the Huntress.” Marguerite and Dorothea.. . . . ........ by Mayer Duet. ................... . .Mrs. W ood and Mrs. Stiles. Sympbony in Hed—“After W bistler.” The Favorite Slave,” ...... by IsTathaniel Sichel Contralto Solo ............. . ..................... Mrs. Wood Statuai^y—“Victory.” Piano Solo. . .......... ........................... Miss A. Maher ‘Gossip,”.......... ....... ; ................ by Percy Moran Duet. . .. . .......... . .Mrs. Stiles and Mrs. Wood Statuary—“Peace.” , Refreshments. C l u b R e p o r t e b ,

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