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The Buffalo express. (Buffalo, N.Y.) 1866-1878, November 06, 1869, Image 2

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BUFFALO EXPRESS, SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 6. I860. fgE BUTFALO EXPEISS SA T U R D A Y , N O V E M B E R fi, 1800. T H E C I T Y . O F F I C I A L F A f B A O F T H E BU F F A L O E X P R W S —M o rning e d ition—pub- IM M ifbY O m E x p ress P r in tin g C o m p o a j every D o m in g , Sunday* ’excepted. T w I y f c u s l '^ w ymt. THE 1VHNTNC EXPBK9 &—Published er*ry after­ noon at 2 T*. M. nnd 4 P. M. EioitT D o u ju u i n«il*d. To C ity 8ub«crib& » ( d e liv e e e i, E itfopn Cent* a week. THE WEEKLY KXPRK 88 — PeLlhbed on Thursday. O n Dollar ard Fifty Ckxts r year. AU bmlfMM letter* o h o u d W addressed to THR E x r u m P t n r r a o C o k p a a y , No. 14 K. S v w street butlalo; Com m u n ic R icos and Corresjioudenc# t o th e “ E d ito r o f t h e E x p ress.”, N o eommudisRtiofl will re e t i r e a ‘ten tio n m deao ac com p e n led by t h # aaaoe a a d irftdreae o f th e w riter, ibly ta 1846; an of tb* aubjeet in the New School iu 1854 wil! leave ’hia undecided in the united body. A The (Hd School e>nd- mned the practice of a tting in time of public pra- er. and that of th e leading of aerniotu in ch u r c h Im> l*ym*n in tho ai>«cxifie of clergyman, in 134H, b. th of w h ich *re oo>npon u e g e a u e r . r d M «• uiitenanced in th e New School 4. H u t m4B| r tc a s tiiu and im p o rt* t «f j»-i -.ve 'ertairi ••deiirere' a n ; a \ in w h ich il.e '.-n n e r s p ir it of t e Old tow a rd o W h*1* ‘'* tfT-c-, «nd i,th«*rs concerning tlie Nmthem churcho-. T »t action of th e Old a-thoo m j r i t r i., i , r . l 1 .. .t th e om n.i *ion-r» from flve , : w ill, of eonrw , nece ,a- • i y a d purposely b»c~ m e invalid trad e r thi.* plan. ’ usuisWog tbe reui.i n, in it* atri-.-tcat a d m«»t •-.;al a spect, coimlv. in th e m e re repeal . f th e Ex ind i. a a c t A-.t of 1SS7. T h e actio n «.f th e O ld Schoo. A '-cm b ly m l3 6 £ , to*, ov vrti h tb * t h u r c h e - a i- .e r o f t o t h e VfefKfHoi. w e re c u t cff from th e rh l r r - s . become* invalid. Mi i t of a u u r w had n i m b r t l in Now School action; and th ie e f f v ttn U y op*u.* th e d o o r f a r t h e r e t n m of tr,o*e e - u r c h e - .l f a r e p nfe- o sufficient l o m a k e t h e m aeck to re tu r n , a h o u ld taV l*o**taa o n of th A r l e a i t . J te h o u d I* a d d e d h*re f i a t i’rof. Chaldea H o d g e (O. *».), of Princeton, li • haa len g beeu th e kuwler of i i>po*ition tr> r t union i o h :a branch, aseert* in th e Prl'ioeto.u 4 u y, 18ttl) t h t th e “ C o n c u rrent D c -lara' • n -Tpro- e-1 w ith th e li* U, a r e n o t Liodinz, only *?• Baaia rtion.rti It w d l evid< n W ®* imyoari b . h t o i d n o t c ecewa r ily f o r p u b lication, b u t a t an ueuroiM #* •c’.f being in <ju« ........................ ........... • e, how e v e r, to avoiJ rw u lta auch •* t t o a e a* rim e d . of gwod faith. T H E E X P R E S S M ay be o b tained o f t h e totlow tng dealer*: B U F F A L O —T . 8. H a w k * , 10 Eaat Seneca stre e t; J. S tillaon, Poet Office; E n*t H e w e r, corner Main a u d M o h a w k ; R. ITagcr, Tifft H o a a c ; A. J. Ilay- » e r , 28SM a ln r t r e t t ; Cl a*. M. Provoovt, 129 Niog a r a a u e e t ; t h e c r A F e lto n , N ew York C e n tral Im* pot#. BA T A T IA -M a c k e y B r.*. LO C E P O R T — W. 8. ScovlUc, Cram p ton A G raham SU S P E N S IO N B R ID G E - R. Roger, S l.etr A Felton. H O R K E L L 8 V IL L E - K. Ilaw e r. U J. Haw ley. D U N K IR K - W . L. S later, A. K. H and. F R E D O N I A - L. S. Howard A Bro. W ESTFIELD —M inton Bros. N IA G A R A FALLS - S hi c r A Felton. TONAW ANDA Sheer A F e lto n , i l . J. Stanley. M E D INA—A. Parmeloc. A T fIC A — E. Ilay n? r I. YOUNGSTOWN - A - H a n i*. SILVER CREEK— E. li. BaUard. ANOOLA—Leroy 8. Dolm an. ILLIN K — J . B. Dick. EAST A U R O R A - J . B. Bayllaa. WILLIAMS W ILLS—P . Wener. E R I E , P a .—L o c k h a rt A P e t t i t , C a u g h t / , McCreory A Co., J . I I Snyder. B E O O T O N -H . 8. W ood* HANTFORD, 0 . W.— A. H a J o a . ORONTO—0 . R. Criahobn. JAM E S T O W N- li. B. Sm ith. PETROLEUM CEN T H E —N icho’»on,A’Oo. PoRTCXJLBORNE—8. S. Sm adea. OORRY, P a .—Barlow A Son. I> R . H R U S C K O X T H R r O V R / M R . T h e re a p p e a rs to be a jarring discord, Hot only betw’een th e G e rm a n nnd Irish bem o c rats, but also J?etwc*en the editors of th e leading Democratic new spapers in the city. The D em o krat (Germ an; in its F r i­ d a y ’s e d itorial on theelection, lias the follow­ ing a ttack upon th e Courier and its “ riDg.” H a v ing asserted t h a t in reality tb e Dem o­ crats had a m a jority iu Erie < o u n ty, be­ cause Alien hail received m ore th a u 400 votes over Greeley, th e h n n o k m t (Dr. Brunck) proceeds as follows : T h a t under puch e ircm n st wic * all th e Dem ocratic candidate* were not elected m u s t aaP-nish every body not a c q u ainted w ith o u r local relations. Wt ahould not perforin our d u ty if wn ncgli-cled t o rail a ttention to th ; <-au» * of t ov v iagular phenom e n o n . T o e BufTilo C’-uritr, tlic only A m e rican D em o cratic pap e r hav, for -* veral yeara p a s t, n t coi.tvnt-d itself with d e fending Democrat ic principles, b u t has form e d a clique which has m o at y controlled thc nom inate n of candid.-i'e*, th e r e b y creating a great dis-atisfaction for *.• eral years hack, and contrihut- i iff not a little t * th e defeat of t h e D e m o c ratic {^»rtv U - t year in this c o u n ty. In ad d ition, t h e sam e paper had, 'b y fathering th e Park law and ih e P a rk com ­ mission. a c 'nally left ti.e D em o c ratic ground and re cognized, in p intiplc, th e C u m m isviou-rulc of tho R e p u b lican party. When tin f'\iirirr naw that groat discontent pre­ v a i l e d a m o n g th e Hi p u b lic a n s , i t b e l i e v e d its e l f ab le t o c a n y th r o u g h th e tn n n i . e r n o f it* r i n g , alth * u h, lo n g liefore t h e n o m i n a t i o n o f t h e c a n d dat*}* a i d be fo r * the d i . ussio n o f the Park law nnd the plans o f the Park f 'o m u i i n i o n e r * , i t had b e e n w a r n e d b y tbe e d i t o r o f th i* t a p e r , in tiie m o s t tr i n l l y b u t tn o s r « r p h s t i c m a n n w r, t h s t n o a u p p . r t i r of tlia t iaw c o u l d bo elec ted . A ll w a* U3ele»*. T lie ('■.»ri< r in te n d e d to ju - tif;. its own eonduct b> the election of the incm b e rN of its rin g . . Its c n n d i d u 'e f r State Ren i-i te d hi* d ig n ty aa fattier of t he Park . H E B I B L E Q U E S T K j X I X C I X L ' J X S A T I . T h e decision of the C incinnati Board of ii.location, against thu reading of th e Bibls the public schools of t h a t city, has in ten ­ ded th e excitem e n t which atten d e d tha prolonged controvaw y over th e question ia t Lad beeu iu progress for several w eeks, tn m ediately after th e vote iu th e Board mul beeu taken and found a d v e rse to the retention of th e Bible as a t* x t book for rer. Ung in th e schools, J u d g e iStorer, of the Superior C o u rt of C incinnati, granted an njunction restraining tlie Board from the x ecu tion of its order. The application for :lio injunction w a s placed on th e ground uut th e C o n s titution of t h s S tate express- y declares t h a t — ' Kel&iun, m o rality, a n d know ledge being cmk.-b- i . tl t o good governm e n t, it aha 1 be th e d u ty of the I .( [. I latu r e to ]■*-* su ita 1“ law* to jiro tect every -i- iui >u* d e n o m ination iu th e peae«*ble eiijoj Dient ; i'eow m m o d e o f public w n rabi|i, and -tu eucoiir- *cboaIa a n d tb e m c a u s ol instru c tio n .” I t argued t h a t t h ; nee of th e Bible is •ys’jiitial to religion, inor*lity, a n d kuow- e-lge. and, therefore, to good governm e n t, .tid th a t it cannot be discontinued in the -viwols w ithout defeating th e purposes of hose w h o fram ed th e C o n stitution. < >n th e o ther hand, those w h o oppose lie reading of th e Bible in th e schools, to- '.-rher w ith th e pinging of religious hym n s, ugued t h a t th e use of the Bible and devo­ id nal exercises were a form of w o rship, uid, under t h e circum stances, a P r o testant o-m of w o rship, w h ich, it was contended? was e x p ressly prohibited by th e C o n s titu­ tion of Ohio, which saj s: ■ p e r s o n siiall tie c o m p i l e d to atten d , erect, util at the luU'll, old’ when lie i■: declared hi* wiiling jK-i’ple. If the C o n n e r hu tlia t i t m im p roper .th Ii.. 'liter I I- the with :arry out the wi'l e t o hi i lii ! een able t.. nr.-le-i'taml in tim. >r tha c.titor of a paper to >-• ttie eliqueanil toactliio pait of a di tator, Kiie < .unity would < veil n.nv be a* . trough Domocratic «.* it used to be before the Courier’* die tat irahip. In future, the candidates for offices will see t iia t it u « uo tiling to g. I a nomination by the Courier ’* clique, ai.d another thing to bo vice a-d In *u«h way the Courier clique will, ner or later, ■ink in to disrepute. F r o m a l l w h i c h i t is t o b e g a t h e r e d t h a t a n e w T a m m a n y B i n g is r i s i n g i n t o e x i s t e n c e a t t h i s e n d o f t h e S t a t e , w h e r e u n t o t h e • d i t o r o f t h e C o u r i e r is aa M a n h a t t a n W i g w a m . Sweeney to the P R E S B T T E R f A X R E C X / o X . T h e r e u n i o n o f t h e o l d a n d n e w S c h o o l s c f t h e P r e s b y t e r i a n ( . 'h u r c h c a u n o w b e p r o n o u n c e d a p r a c t i c a l l y a c c o m p l i s h e d f a c t m o r e t h a n .t w o - t h i r d s o f th o P r e s b y t e r i c t h a v i n g r a t i f i e d t h e “ B a s i s ” s u b m i t t e d to t h e m b y th e ] v o t e o f t h e tw o G e n e r a l A s s e n : . b l i e s h e l d in N e w Y o r k l a s t M a y . I n th e a c t i o n u p o n t h e s u b j e c t t a k e n b y t h e G e n e r a l A s s e m b l i e s o f t h e tw o b r a n c h e s a t t h e tim e m e n t i o n e d , a l l “ p l a n s o f u n i o n ” p r e v i o u s l y d i s c u s s e d w e r e c a s t a s i d e , i t w i l l b e re m e m b e r e d , a n d t h e p r o p o s a l s u b m i t t e d w a s , s i m p l y , t h a t t h e r e u n i o n b e e f f e c t e d u p o n t h e b a s i s o f t h e H o l y S c r i p t u r e s , a n i l th e o r i g i n a l , u n c h a n g e d s t a n d a r d s o f d o c t r i n a l g o v e r n m e n t o f t h e P r e s b y t e r i a n C h u r c h . U p o n t h i a p r o p o s i t i o n m o s t o f t h e P r e s b j • t e r i e s h a v e n o w v o t e d , a n d w i t h a r e s u l t w h i c h d e c i d e s th e c o n s o l i d a t i o n o f t h e P r e s b y t e r i a n C h u r c h . T h e l a s t r e p o r t p u b l i s h e d o f t h e v o t e s t h a t h a v e b e e u r e c e i v e d is a* fo l l o w s .-— Pregbffteries I'oii,,./ A uai net the l'.ojio*e,l IJaei.. rr !(• ii it ii i .i, Went Lexington, d for, a ag a :n*t . B razil, -j - 3 . H u .ix.u, i? !.<. Prerb’iteries Votrivr fo r the t l a n ig j n i t v o t U n rtniin- otmlif. — N o r tiiuniforiaud, 45 — 1 , Potom a c , 1 2 - 4 . tV*«t J e rsey, '16 t i ; B a ltim o re, 211 1 2 ; B u rlington, 7 - 5 ; R a ritan, 2 2 - 1 ; D■ n e .a l, 20 2 ; New Cast-e, *27 9 ; H u n tingdon, 38— 2 3 : f a r isle, 44—6 ; N o rth R iver, I S - *2; Lafayette, 12 3 ; P o tosi, 8 -1 , New to n , 13 4 ; Cone .rd, 2 1 ; Rock R iver, 14 —C W a rren. Stt-uW n v ille, 42 1 ; C h icago,33—4 . Zane*vilte, 21 l l ; Blr.om inglon, SI 7 : Luzerne, \M 3 ; Fairfield, ‘26 3 ; Long Island, 2 9 - 2 ; V n cennea, 12 5 . Lewes, 7 - 6 ; Sangam o ::, 2 0 - 2 ; Louisville, a - d ; Mitwotui R iver, 1 4 - 2 ; De* Moines, 21 1 ; F o rt \ uync, 17 3 ; Indianapolis, 15 1 ; S u -quehsnna, 14— 2 ; P a lm v r s , 17—1 : PH !a •lelpbia, 21 4 ; New Yo k ail b u t I in favor ; NL w O rleans, 6 — 1 ; D u b u q u e , 2 1 7 . H . R e serve, ! ) - 1 ; Transylvania, 12 -fi ; Sclm lcr, 21 1. Presbyterie* Voting I ’naniirU‘ii*l</ in Farm-. -W e s t V irginia, Philadelphia Second, C o n n e c ticut, Eliza- bethtow u , M aumee, Vinton. R e d stone, P a d u c a h , .St. ('lairsvil e, Neosho, New York Seeond, Colum b u s, ^N a shville, Topeka, Iowa, New A lbany, M unc e, F ran k lin . W o o ster. Lozaiisport, C a lifornia,fet. P a u l. M uhawk, Oregon, Marion, l 'a h s tir.e, Craw fordsvi le. Find av, W ashing*on, Gen-see R iver, L o n d o * d -rrv. * ncford, Holaton, Milwauki-*, Lake, Peoria. • T h i s m a k e s a t o t a l o f e i g h t y o u t o f t h e 1 4 3 P r e s b y t e r i e s ; b u t l a t e r , in f o r m a t i o n , i t i s s a i d b y t h e N e w Y o r k T r i b u n e , w a r r a n t s t h e a s s u r a n c e t h a t t h c fu l l t w o - t h i r d s h a v * p o s i t i v e l y r a t i f i e d t h e b a s i s . S o far a s a s c e r t a i n e d n o w —o u l y tiv e P r e s ­ byteries r e m a i n i n g t o b e h e a r d f r o m — t h e r e have been b u t t w o v o t e s c a s t o n t h e N e w School side (o n e in A l b a n y , o n e in t h e D i s ­ trict of C o l u m b i a ) a g a i n s t t h e r e u n i o n . I n the Old S c h o o l t h e r e h a a lie e n m o r e o p p o s i ­ tion, but m a n y o f th o s e w h o v o t e d in the- negative did so, i t is s a i d , f o r t h e s a k e o f consistency, a n d w i l l n o t s t a n d i a t h e w a y o f the c o n s u m m a t i o n o f th e r e u n i o n . D r . llobort J. B r e c k i n r i d g e is t h e o n l y in a n 'o f prominence w h o t a k e s a s t a n d o f u n c o n d i ­ t i o n a l h o s t i l i t y t o i t . I f c h a s g o n e tlie l e n g t h o f r e s i g n i n g h i s p r o f e s s o r s h i p a t D a n ­ v i l l e , i n a c h a r a c t e r i s t i c l e t t e r , in w h i c h h e declares his i n t e n t i o n n o t to s u r r e n d e r , a s a Director o f t h e i n s t i t u t i o n , h i s p o w e r o f dissent fr o m a n y a c t i o n w h i c h a G e n e r a l Assembly, “ w h o s e t e r m o f e x i s t e n c e h a s “ been prolonged i a s o e x t r a o r d i n a r y a “ m a n n e r , ” m a y fo r c e , o r e n d e a v o r t o fo r c e , upon l h a t s c h o o l . Some c f t h e d o c t r i n a l e f f e c t s o f t h e r e u n ­ io n a r e t h u s stated in a n e l a b o r a t e a r t i c l e on t h s subject, w h i c h w e iin d p u b l i s h e d in the T r i b u n e : A n intereatiuK f e a ture in connection w ith th c re­ u n ion will b® tlic i n v a l i d a t e . i cf *uch priced e n s as h a r e form e rly b s e n esta dished in one branch ami n o t an o th e r . In c i t h e r G e n e ral A w t n b i y th e r e hav* been “ d e liverances,” u p o n m a n y s u b jects which afford p r e o s d c u l l o r s u b s e q u e n t ca*< s of a lik e na­ tu r e . By th e fo u r t h of thu ‘ C o n c u rrent D e clara­ tions’* a p p e n d e d t o t h e plan (of 1809), al! such pro cedents fail to th e g ro u n d unless th e y have beeu rs- U b lU b s d n o t io o u t , b u t in b o th Assemblies. Thsro a r e , uf c o u r s e , a g r e a t n u m b e r of th e e. W it lie fol­ low ing wHI show th e b**rin^ of tlie “ d R iar« tio n ” Q'jousOKie m a tters in th e f u tu r e polity of tb* united C h u rch; I . T h e OW School tleei l e d , i a 1842, th a t m a r r ia/.j w ith a dorwaaed wrife’i si*ter was urw e n p tural. This h # i ns* r bsen a s u b ject of N ew School acti n , and th c r e u a io u will tbero c r e : th a t considerable m a jo r ity o f Old S c h o .- i, c upic a k? iiave lony sine* cea.wd to believe in tin s c u r io u i d o c trine. 2. Roman Jic tap tf c n i r * s d.-flared fnvkRd l.y th e O d '.Ti^ ictuitl fii,ion of t i e tw o O o n e n l A , ■ u d d i e s i n t o o n e D° l t a k e p l a c e u n t i l : m e e t i n g o f “ e x t M a y . O n W e d n e s d a y * xi, t h e M t h i n s t . , t h e a d j o u r n e d s e s m o n , •A th e £ w o A s s e m b l i e s a r e t o b e h e l d in t h e . . t y o f P i t t s b u r g h , t h e O l d S c h c o l m e e t i n g tl i e F i r s t a n d t h e N e w S c h o o l in t h e J 'i i i r d P r e s b y t e r i a n C h u r c h . T h e i r b u s i n e s 4 , I j o t h s e p a r a t e a a d c o m m o n , w i l l s t i l l b e in d u c t e d in s e p a r a t e s e s s i o n s . u l a n y place of w o rship, or i p.cf.-r ii:; us soc ctv ; ri^hUof . ons' : To compel persons to support aud main- ila schools w h e rein th e r e are religious ex- rcises to whieh # ther persons could not oiiscienetonsly consent, was argued to br . violation of this p a r t of th c S tate C o n s ti­ tution! i he q u e stion is now oue of law , and m u st . • de i led as .such by th e Suprem e Court 6 Ohio, to w h ich the argum e n t of th e in ­ i' ;ti jm w ill be carried. T h e Board of :! .tieation has appropriated $2500 for the • ■ ral c o n te st, in the m eantim e , th e sacred k holds its place in the schools, and a t A p ril, w h e n the election of new mcm- ■ rs of the Board takes place, the w e ight of P r o testan t C h ristian sentim e n t to be i . o k ed in i ts defence w ill be fully tested. The m ainspring of the m o v em ent for the xelusion of th e Bible from th e Cincinnati :bools is fouud, of course, in th e Komar, atholic Church, although a considerable .1 -enforcem ent to it came from the Jowisl. •ngregations of th e city, and from the .•'ree Thinkers. Singularly enough, th t : ading cham pions on th e tw o sides in t h t liscussion of the question before th e Board were both U n itarian m inisters —Rev. Mr. Vickers for exclusion, and flev. M r. Mayc • n in s t. The vote in th e Board, whic-V .*tood 22 for exclusion and 15 a g a inst, k- inalyzed politically as follows: A y es, 12 Democrats and li) .Republicans; nays, 12 !>■‘publicans aud 3 Democrats. Religiously the a n a lysis is as follows: Yeas, 10 Roman ■ a tholics, S Free T h inkers, 3 Protestants, I J e w ; N a y s, 13 Protestants, 1 J e w , 1 Free Thinker. T h e Cleveland H e rni-l rem a rk upon th e subject: Thc m u st tho u g h tf u l feature in th e vote Ir, th< inciiinati Board of Education, excluding th e Bibli •:n th e echo ls, is th e m e e ting of t h ; extrem e s ri.lels ami free thinkers dem a n d th e expulsion oi h.' Bible, ht cause they wish t h e rchc ” 1* to he God • Rom an C'ath lies have ever com p lained of tl;* • ' ; die School* b e e a u c th e y did n o t e m b race religion 'h it is, Rom an C atiiolic religion in th e ir teachings dotli tliow) . x treim * ’ s tru. k hands in th e onslaught .* < iu. im iati. Ti.e fir-t e!a-s have th e m e rit of hun y, ior t h e ir o b ject i - 1 >> b a n ish r e ig io u s instruction, i h« la tt e r class m e rely joined in tl.i* crusade us •rid 'uiinary sU p to Dio u s ier d is rupt ion of o u r school > -tein, so t lia t il m ay be reorga: iz d on a denoini . ,ii >nai basis, am i th e Rom a n C a tholir* d aw a • rtion of t h e school f u n d fo r t h e i r so. tar.an echooL* UBE. I t is *€{ln i m p o n r o l o t o a s c e r t a i n w i t h c e r t a i n t y t h e s t a n L i n g o f p a r t i e s in t h e n ^ w l . t e l j c t e d S e n a t e . T w o d i s t r i c t s — t h e N i n c > e n : h (O n e i d a ) a n d *h«? T w e n t y - t h i r d ( t 'h e l l a n f o , D e l a w a r e a n d S c h o h a r i e ) — s t i l l r® ■ ain i i d o u b t . T h e v o t e . i n t h e fo r m e r , .vr: . c h o t g h t t o L e R e p u b l i c a n b y a c o f f s id - e - a b ! e n a j o r i t y , i3 s o c l o s e t h a t o n l y t h e • i f n e ia l c, n v a s s c a n d e t e r m i n e w h i c h o f t h e tw o ra n . j i d a t e s ia e l e c t e d . O a o n e s i d e fo u r m a j j f r i t y is c l a i m e d f o r G o o d w i n , R e ­ p u b l i c a n . a n d o n t h e o t h e r ‘s i d e S a n f e r d ’* ! D e m o c r a t ) e l e c t i o n b y th r e e m a j o r i t y , is s t r o n g l y a s s e r t e d . F r o m t h e T w e n t y - U x i r d D i s t r i c t n o t h i n g a t a l l d e f i n i t e w i t h r e g a r d ;o t h e ! S e n a t o r i a l e l e c t i o n e e e m a t o h a v e ;:c e n h e ^ r d , a n d w e c a n f i n d n o r e a s o n a s y e t h r g f v i n g u p t h e e x p e c t a t i o n t h a t w a s .•ute1 r a i n e d o f t h e r e c o v e r y o f t h e D i s t r i c t , .o s t .o s t y e a r b y R e p u b l i c a n d i s s e n s i o n s . F m r d i s t r i c t s — t h c E l e v e a t b , F i f t e e n t h . S i x t e e n t h a n d T w e n t y - e i g h t h — h a v e c e r - 4ir.fr b e e n g a i n e d b y t h e D e m o c r a t s ; a n d i wo t h e T h i r t y - f i r s t a n d T h i r t y - s e c o n d - h a v c b e e n g a i n e d b y t h e R e p u b l i c a n s . I f she t w o d o u b t f u l o n e s n a m e d a b o v e a r e de- •B r a i n e d i n o u r f a v o r , t h e T w e n t y - t h i r d in . . a t e v e n t b e i n g a R e p u b l i c a n g a i n , th e r t i e s w i l l b e t i e d in t h e S e n a t e . O t h e r - •. jr. t h e D e m o c r a t s w i l l h a v e a m a j o r i t y of j.'.h c r Iv o o r f o u r , a c c o r d i n g a s t h e y s e c u r e m e & l> t h o f t h e tw o d i s t r i c t s in d i s p u t e Tlrfc cc m p l c x i o n o f t h e A s s e m b l y is a s i n c e r t a i j ;, s o f a r , a s t h a t of t h e S e n a t e . T h e ) n o y n r e s u l t s o f t h e e l e c t i o n a r e , D e m .tcrafci 55 , R e p u b l i c a n s 58, e l e v e n d i s t r i c t s rem a ining in d i s p u t e . T h e s e d i s t r i c t s a r e ne e a c h i n D e l a w a r e , F u l t o n a n d l l a m i l - o n , L e w i s , M o n t g o m e r y , O n t a r i o , O s w e g o , U s e g o , . S a r a t o g a a n d S u f f o l k C o u n t i e s , a n d - . t o in K i n g s . T e n o f th e m w e r e R e p u b - a u y e a r , w h i l e o n e o n l y — t h e E i g h t h D i s t r i c t o f K i n g s — w a a D e m o c r a t i c . T h e r o b a o i l ’t i e s w o u l d s e e m t o b e s t i l l i n f a v o r • a alight Republican m a jority in th e As •cmbly, THE STATE TICKET. Ou tht? general vote in th e S tate, the H or Ufa latest figures claim a Dem o cratic m a jority for Nelson of 7811, those of the Albany A r t/us 25,240; th e Tribune's tables j\Ucede 18,975, and those of th e Times only 527. These discrepances i a tho calcu- Utdon \ h iw how purely i t is a m a tter of _uess- r i i r k , and how extraordinarily slow ■-he ac ui 1 c o u n t is iu being r e turned. ERIE COUNTY. Oflida- retu r n s from th e tow n s iu the county o ime in very tard ily , an d we arc •tot y e t s ble to give corrected figures of thc total vet i for t h e county candidates. Even t t h e * i y returns, one d i s tr ict—th e second s t r i c t u th e T w e lfth W a rd—is still lack ...g at th e C ity C lerk’s Office, and th. [»ectora of four o ther districts—th e first audthirc districts o f th e Seventh W a rd, the v rst district of Eighth W a rd , an d the i Jiirtt-C i ;h W a r d —did not m ake t h e ir re ­ tu rn s rjtii yesterday, although tho law require:- diem to do so w ithin tw e n ty-four hours ter thc closing of th e polls. This habitually occurring delinquency on th e ■jart of i n spectors of E lection £peds to be irrectril b y a few applications of t h e pen­ alties of the law. O u r ‘.;ibles, revised and corrected by <>mpar iton w ith th e official r e turns, except :u the-(use of th e one district still unre- >orted--for w h ich our o w n figures obtained •l e le c tion night a re probably e x a c t— show ihe folio-ving m a jorities in th e city for thc minty Candidates: Fur Seimt .r, L. L. Lewis, Rc|>.................... SO maj. ,, C.Hut^ Treas., Wm. B. Sirret, Rej. ...1331 „ ,, Corui er, B. W. Sherman, Rep ............. 73 „ M r. L :wia’ m a jority in th e county will .ii'obabl^ be not far from 300, M r. S h e r­ m an’s Toont th e same, and th a t of Mr. Sirret a* o u t 1500. *■ THE t ITY. ( >a tb’': C'ity T icket, th e m a jorities now leterm i 4?d a re as follows: r R e p u b lican. *!'i;. or -A, exander Brush ........................ 239 maj. City A ttu ’ iey-Benjamin H. Wiliiams .. .•>' “ : reet ( •■» imiss-uner Ge > IV (I llespie... . 43s “ ,t.\ Sin ivj-or-John A. D itto............... 30 “ • . .•r**-er if* Poor- F. J . K r a f t .................... ..1512 ** T h e W a shington Chronicle contends th a t the national governm e n t should levy a tax upon dogs. IL ascertains from th e last enaus t h a t there are a t least six m illions of logs in th e U n ited States. A t a tax of ■uo d o llar a hoad, these dogs w o u ld yield ;* revenue of six m illion dollars ; or if half of diein proved ownerless, and w ere killed off, three m illions w ould rem a in. ^ B u t the pecuniary Lent rit w o u ld not end *erc. The report of th e Com m issioner of A g r iculture pat's down th e loss to th e country in sheep killed at tw o million dollars, and nearly a million m ore in injured. This loss is e q u iv­ alent to six million pounds of wool. Farm- pronounce th e loss by dogs to be tw o ■wr c e n t, on all th e m oney invested in sheep .jrowing or grazing. W h y , then, should not the curs be either tax e d out of e x istence r m ade a source of revenue ? T h e caniue nuisance is serious enough a n d of m agnitude -nongh to be w o rthy th e atten tio n even of statesm e n and financiers, and we are w ith the Chronicle in crying to Congress fo r a dog tax. F o u r th 1 F i 't h W ard—J S ixth W a rd - F Sere n th W ard— Adam K a r u , Rep. n s t t h W a rd—T h o m a s S . Hughe*, D n n . N inth W a rd PLiilip W. Glr&^.n, Ilep. Tt-ath W a rd—Jacob. Bowers, Rep. E leventh W a r d —J ; i m Crow ell, Rzp. Tw e lfth W a rd Ja—|iii iio h u , B- p. T h ir teen th W a n ! 4*. A W a ldron, D«.m. tea s tan d wof a lly in need of fr o m t h e u n p u b l i s h e d exist, but which h a v e h i t l ■d b y th e com pilers of th e Am erica. M r . Park m a n h i assiduous in his search a n d has d r a w n fro m iseible s c arce, in b e th th e old wo: ; a n 1 th e new . m a terials for his HistQ- :* i Ifow w e l l he has s u c c e e d e d the b o o k speaks I for x 'e e i f , s n d t h # clem of r e a d e r * t o uhom the w o rk e s p e c i a l l y a p p e a l s , ' w i l l testify t o : the vast a m i i m p o r t a n t inform a tion i t c on­ tains. B u f f a l o — M a rtin Taylor. Loring, of B o s t o n , h a s p u b l i s h e d t h e last novel by G e o r g e M a c d o n a l d , M . A . , author I of “ A n n a l s of & Q u i e t N e ighborhood,’ ' “ A l e e Forbes of H o w g l e n , ” n n d other a p p r e c i a t e d a t c r i e s . phe- )Jf H A D K S IX B O O K X 0 T I C E S A ^ D R E V I E W 6 . T h e b o o k s la i d o n o u r t a b l e d u r i n g t h c p a s t w e e k , h a v e fc*-.- f - r t Ke g r e a t e r p a r t , v o l u m e a u i j * ' °.i!c s t o r i e s c o n t i u u i u g | w e l l k n o w n a n d s e r i e s , w h o s e m e r i t s h a v e a l r e a d y b e e n d i s - I “ D a v i d E l g i n b r o d is t h e c r o w n i n g w o r k o f cn s s e « I , a n d w h o s e u s e f u l n e s s s t a n d s u n ­ q u e s t i o n e d . P r o m i n e n t a m o r g t h a r e c e n t p o e t i c a l c o m p i l a t i o n s is o n e o f L e e & S h e p a r d ’s p u b - iic a t i o n s , »“ E c h o e s f r o n t H o m e , ” n c o l l e c ­ tio n o f s o n g s , b a l l a d s , a n d o t h e r H o m e P o e t r y , i l l u s t r a t e d b y H a m m a t t B i l l i n g a . T h e o b j e c t o f t h e w o r k is t o i n c l u d e w i t h i n th e lim i t s o f a .s i n g l e v o l u m e p o s s i b l e , s e l e c t i o n s f r o m t h e s t a n d a r d p o e t s , o n ] t h e s u b j e c t s o f iH o m e a n d H o m e - t u o u g h t s a n d w e l l in d e e d , h a s t h e e d i t o r s u c c e e d e d in t h e p l e a s a n t t a s k t o w h i c h h e d e v o t e d h i m s e l f . H o m e i n c l u d e s n o t o n l v the r o o f b e n e a t h w h i c h t h e especial id o l s of a m a n ’s lo v e r e p o s e , n o t o n l y t h e p l a c e of n a t i v i t y a n d t h e s c e n e s o f c h i l d h o o d , whose p l e a s a n t r e m i n i s c e n c e s g i v e c o l o r to v e r y o n e ’s a s p i r a t i o n s fo r p e a c e a n d h a p p y a t r u l y poetic w riter. T h e v e r d i c t * of the English review s are favorably expressed, and are probably th e best com m ents th a t could be m ade on th c book. T h e London Xjrecta’or s a v s : “ T h e philosophy o ‘D a v id E lginbrod’ is sim p le a n d profound i t s p o e try i* b r ig h t an-l genuine, aud its whole tissue is tho u g h tf u l w ith gleams of m a n y a s | trug a r t w o u ]<i |je difficult to draw a nobler picture t h a n t h a t of D a v id Elgin­ brod. I t is oua not e a sily to be forgotten.” 8uch a golden opinion could only have been g a i n e d by deserving m erit. To be had of Breed, L e n t & Co. Of t h e juveniles, ifc c a n only be said t h a t some are good and some are b e tter. E x ­ perience, a n d th e justice cf the public taste, th a t e x c ite th e dem a n d for th# m u ltiplica- . — ^ tion of these books a re supplying th e place of freedom in th e f o rtu n e ; b u t th e cou n tr y of I l .> r , . , ... , ’ ; rhem o re t h a n foolish s tones, euch a s “ J a c k , one s b ir th , t h e whole land over w h ich th e ! Hag floats, to w h ich be owed his early al iegiance is “ H o m e .” T h e e m igrant d ivided by weary leagues of tu r b u len t ocean, from the land of his fathera,*no m a tter if t h c land to w h ich he has come, offers in clim ate, soil a n d association all t h e a d v a n tages lack th e G iant K iller,” and th e thousand and one hobgoblin tales th a t haTe terrified, in- j s tead of am u sing th e young readers a nd j listeners of preceding generations, w ith | n a rratives of f a ; t and fiction, upon which th e m o st cultivated m inds em ploy tlicm- | selves. T h e language «eed is good, tho ed by his m o tberlcoantry, ufcill in the fam ily ; raoraj t e c h i e m e t om m a r a d a b k . » d circle, tells to his children the trad itio n s * “ H o m e ,” a n d fosters in th e ir breasts a kin- 1 dred feeling for t h c old land and i t , people j t h M tbe7 e a r of T h is love of hom e is the m o st sacred and he exam p les of w o rthy living arc incen­ tives to good behavior, far m ore profitable lieing carried off b y a tcr- l ribie m y th , or eaten by a seven Leaded m o st pow e rful of m a n ’s attach m e n ts; th is i ;a • r 1 ’ g-ant; aud it is th e d u ty oF e v e ry p a rent t. it, is t h a t sends tim id m en to t h e field of 1 435 m a j. II. Di tri i l l . D s tr i t II. VIII. \II. T h e Tem p erance p a rty of M innesota nom inated a S tate tick e t w ith th e avowed ••hject of defeating th e Republican party in 'b e State. In the Tem p erance Convention I ■ was s tated th a t the ouly w a y to force the I f.cpublican party to m ake prohibition p a r t i oi its policy was to defeat th a t party by ; voting for a Tem perance ticket. Such a tick e t was, theiefore, p u t in tho field, an-l the result has had the effect of showing how u tterly w e a k such a m ovem ent m u st alw ays prove to be. The vote of th e State is a light one; b u t th e Republican candi­ dates are chosen by th e average m a jority of the party. T h e Reform Convention of the Jew ish Rabbis, in Philadelphia, yesterday adopted resolutions favoring a change in the m a rital laws, acknowledging th e woman as the equal of the m an, and providing for a a ex­ change of rings a s a p a r t of the cerem o n y, ! ami also a b o lishing divorces by the church, ! and leaving the power of divorce entirely to the judiciary of th e States. ■ *kii|>trol!':r--R. D. Foril ....... Gify Tre# irer J. S. Ilawer tri ................... 937 “ IL.\ cr i ’ Taxe*- El j .li Ambrose 45 “ > i'. t of Si :hools— Tlioma* Lolhr p ............ 304 *• A ^ - r John McManus ............................ 7.» “ Justice of 1‘eace—Maurice O u rtney 78 “ ASSBMELY. In tin th ree A ssem b ly D istricts c-f the city the 'csults of th e election arc as fol­ lows: —Joseph Ilamler, Dem, 691 majority. -James Franklin, Rep., 162 “ —Albert H. Blosaom, Rei'. 333 “ ALDER01EN. A 8 we announced yesterday, th e official »tu rn s m ake one change in th e list of Al- ierm e n Vhic’n we gave W e d n esday morn- ng, M r. flopkins having sustained a defeat u tlie ETivcnth W a rd. The account now >tands as follows: I. VV* d—William f’. Smith, D. II. “ —John Booth, R. III. ‘ —Samuel G. Peters, R. IV. “ - Dr. Edward Siorck, R. V. “ -Charles Groben, D. A !. “ Michael Lantr, D. —John Wcrrick, I). —John Sheehan, D. Frank A. Sears, R. Lewi* M. Evans, It. —Solomon Scheu, D. Uaac I. -\’an Allen, It. -Mil. “ —AlmusT. Patch:n, D. itupubli an Aldermen elected ........................... c “ holding over ................... 10—16 Democratic Aldermen elected ........................... 7 ■ “ holding over....................3 19 iicpubi can majority in Council............................... (j SUPERVISORS. Owing a a d o u b t in several instances, which coi lil only be settled by th e official returns, v d - h a v e refrained h i th e r to from •Attempting -o m a k e up a list of t h e Super visors ele-tb'd. W e are now able to m ake \ correct it-dem e n t, w h ich show s a R e p u b ­ lican m a jority of Supervisors elected in thn city, oonsn-ry t o th e exhibits th a t have bflen published : First t^'ari—John Pi*r, Democrat. “ “ -Edward Mullihan, Dem-Krat. Second tYard—Hugh Webster, Repub ican “ “ - Albert Ilaight, Rcpubliean. Ttiir.J Ward- John Mahony, Democrat. •• -James V. Hayes, Democrat. Fourji Ward—Qustavu* C. Grhnard, Deni. “ \ “ —Louis Wilhelm, Republican, l’iftii 1/ard William Seymour, Democrat. “ “ —J. C. Dresuher, Democrat. Sixtii F*ard—Leopold Mullenhoff, Democrat. “ —Casper Meyer. Democrat. .seventh V ard—Conrad Braunn, Republican. “ —Conrad Baer, Republican. Eighth Ward—Stephen McQuade, Republican. ** —Daniel Cruise, Democrat. Nintn \ a r d —Daniel Burt, Republican Elias Green, Kepubli'jan. Philip Miller, Republican. Charles Young-, Republican. Eleven: i B^rd- A’onzi Weheter, Republican. — PhiioA. Balcom, Republic: n Twelfth W%d- Jacob Smith, Democrat. “ * -Frank Forness, Democrat. Thirteent t Wr.rd -William Graham, Republican. Rcpiibiicani ........................................... 13 '■ Democrats.'................................................................ 12 I j encourage t h e production of th e m o d ern ! juvenile books by purchasing as largely as j h is m eans adm it of. From Breed, L e n t A ; Co. we have this w e e k “ The F rench Ro- 1 b insoa Crusoe,” a companion t o th e “ Swiss , Fam ily Robinson; “ How Charley R o b e rts Became a M a u ,” and “ IIow E v a R o b e rta G a ined her E d u c a tion;” aud from M a rtin Taylor “ A L ittle Boy’6 S to ry .” M r. T. S. H a w k e a has s*ut in “ The A m e rican Housew ife, ” a collection of receipts in all branches of cooking, and num e rous b in ts as to pleasant living besides. A noticc'contained in the book revicvs of last S a turday, October 23rd, has elicited th e following note, which is acceptable not only giving w h a t is undoubtedly a proper estim a te of th e book, b u t also as an endorsem ent of th e views expressed in the notice referred to. Thc reverend gcntlem a i w'hose nam e th e eom inunicarioa bears, ii qualified both by education aud experience to iniluence public opinion, a n d the m ajority of thinking m en into whoso hands th e book m ay fall w ill not consider th e following expressions e x tre m e :— TU T T L E 'S GOD ID E A IN HISTORY. B uffalo , N o v e m b e r 4, lSt>9. To the Editor of the Express: Y o u r recent review of M r. H u dson T u ttle's book v/ita th c above t it le was em i­ nently’ ju s t as far as it w e n t ; b u t your m easure of justice wa3 altogether too s h o it und lenient to m eet th c m e rits of th e case. < >n iny first perusal of tho book I though I w o u ld w r ite a m o re extended review* of it ; b u t npon m a ture reflection, 1 think you bestow ed m ore respect upon i t th a u it deserves in giving i t any notice w h atever. T h e author’s conclusions d o m o st forcibly rem ind mo of th e frog who came up from tbe depths of a m u d d y pond, poked o u t hii head, took a look a t th e sun through liis m u d -blesred eyes and gravely rem a rked. “ I d o n ’t t h in k the sun i3 m u ch of au improve m e n t upon o u r phosphorescent lights af:er all. ” The a u th o r w rites w ell a n d learned!, b u t h e comes up from the depths of all thc cesspools of ignorance and superstition, from ancient H indooism to th e va­ garies of th e Aztecs, looks upou the Bible and Bible C h r is tianity through hia bleared vision, and because hep;reeiv< a resem b la n c e in certain colors and aspects, he concludes th a t tho Bible ar.d B ibl C h r is tianity is an out-grow th from th' cesspools in which he revels, and not much of a n im p rovem e n t after all. V*'hy d o e s n 't M r. T u ttle account for th e advance of civi­ lization an d th e im p rovem e n t of th ’ A r ts and Sciences under th e reign and influenc of C h ristianity ? W h y doesn't he tell us I h o w it is th a t th# very system s o u t oi | w h ich he attem p ts to prove th e Bible and i C h ristianity have sprang, have universally J d e g raded h u m a n ity and rotarde 1 th e pro- i qress of c ivilization, w h ile the Bible aud the Tentl V.'ir.J battle, a n d weak m en to endure th e tedious m arches and dreadful exposures cf cam ­ paigns, and th e book w h ich has for its ■ avowed object t h e stim u lation of these feel- ! nigs is w o rthy of endorsem ent. M r. Dana Estes, tho com p iler of th e volume, “ Echoes ' from H o m e ,” has culled from th e literatu re of th e E n g lish language th e choicest selec­ tions bearing on th e subject, and t h e table of contents bear3 th e nam e s of m any o b ­ scure, as well as all the m a s ter poets of the past four h u n d r e d years. In th e preface a graceful trib u te is paid to Scotland, as ele­ g a n t as it is deserved, oi p e a k ing of the sources from w h ich he has draw n t h e ex­ tra c ts which he presents to t h e public, the E d itor says, “ A noticeable fact i9 the alm o st entire d e a rth of hom e poetry among the works of th e older English poets; th e ir > jotch neighbors seem lo have m ade up for th is dciicicncy, and some of t h e m o st ten ­ der au d pathetic pieces of tliis kind ate rrom the pens of Scotia’s B a rds.” T h e book ia a rranged and the poem s'classilied by s u b ­ jects— “ Our C o u n try, O u r H o m e ,” “ i ’oetry of Home J o y s and Domestic Scenes;” “ P o e ­ try of H o m e A ssociations,” and “ P o e try of C o n tem p lation and In s p ir a tio n .” in all respects tho book i-i a good one, and has peculiar claim s for a place in tho fam ily library. For a presentation or gift book f,»r the holidays, no oue possessed of l iterary taste w o u ld, after exam ination, hesitate t<» endorse and recom m e n d it. It m ay be had a t M essrs. Breed, L e n t & Co.'s. A n o ther volum e of com p ilations issued by th e same publishers aud brought to our notice by M essrs. Breed, L e n t & Go , is “ Living T h o u g h ts,” on th e subjects of “ C h ristian E x p e riences; T h e C h ristian Graces; C h ristian E ffort; and T h e Source of S tr e n g th .” The object of th e w o rk is concisely s tated in th e stanza w h ich digni­ fies th e title page and stands a proud m o tto for t h e book. \ Think truly; ami thr thoughts “ Shall ti.e world’s farcins feed; *• Speak truly, and each word of thine \ Shall be a fruitful seed; •• Live truly, and thy life shall he “ A jp-eat aiiiLuublc creed.” U n d e rneath this is engraved a Cross, the symbol of civilization, the sign of g r e a t ­ ness. Inspired by the sentim e n t of the m o tto and in th e service of H im w h o died upon th a t Cross, th e great m inds from whose w o rks th e selections of “ L iving T h o u g h ts ” a re m ade, w e re perfected; and M r. M e ans’ com p ilation is only one more w itness for th e t r u t h , one more advocate for th e essentials of C h ristianity, one m o re d e ­ fense set up against the attack s of infidel­ ity. The book is en tirely non-sectarian in its character, and th e care exercised as well as tb e range included in th e w’orks, renders it aceepfcable to any believer in C h ristianity, no m a tter to w h a t particular nam e or c reed he attaches himself. “ Svbaris and o ther H o m e s,” by th c Ifev. E. K. H a le, has oome to hand from | C h r is tianity w h ich he a e o lutooyerthrow has M a rtin Taylor, bears w ith it ’change equal to t h a t of W illiam B. A s tor | on the m o n e tary; a n d this latest produc- i tion, fey valuable ideas and fine w riting, adds to the high reputation already estab- ! lished Ijy M r. H a le. In th e present work ! th e au th o r has chosen a field as wide as the need for im p rovem e n t is urgent. The j reform a tion of city governm e n ts, and th e ' am e liorition of th e condition of th e crow d s i w h o people th e g r e a t commercial centres j are subjects fraught w ith im p o rtance, and - 1 a m a g is trate w h o w a s n ’c b.n-tn-proof alm o st a r y kind of logic, wo-.Id b e a judi- oial p h e n om enon on w h ich 1 w o uld fike to gaze tw ,oty-five cents’ w o r th in ex pensiyn. *4 m: r a tion. .. ^ ~ * Ft*r t h e inform a tion of th'-ee w h o desire a key t o thc frrtnre, I append a brief glos­ sary of dream s t h a t seldom fail to connect. S tudy i t atten tiv e ly and you w ill become th e architect—o r rath e r t h e tu r n k e y —of your own fortune. Satisfaction guaran­ teed. To dream of bathin<j presages a pure life. A vigorous use of soap and w a ter w ill a id this dream m a terially in bringing thing# eff. To dream of a cojjin denotes goo I luck. A friend of m ine enjoyed th is dream once, and fifteen years and six m o n ths afterw a rds to a day, his rich m o ther-in-law died and left him —hsppy. H e is confident t h a t if ho had dream e d it tw ice she w o u ld have died sooner a n d left him more. To dream you are eloquent is a delusion not alw a y s dissipated b y daylight. It ought to be a sure u g n of th e lock-jaw , but to t h e m isery of m a n k ind it m eans t h a t another jackass feels inspired to win th e cham p ion b e lt from Dem osthenes. To dream of deoJh is an omen of long life. P lenty gi old nuisances w o u ld have been abated long ago, if they hadn’t hung round j u s t to verify this pestilent dream . The only rem edy for this dream is suicide. This rem e d y is som e w h at violent, b u t it rarely fails to benefit—society. To dream you are a puppy presages rn- cessive life. If you arc a puppy don’t waste your intellect in dream s; w a ste ifc on nobby garm e n ts , which are “ a success, w o rthy of your proudest am b ition. To dream of an elephant is a sign o f m a t­ rim ony. The elephant dream is Brigham Y oung’s best hold, lie h a j th a t dream w ith fearful frequency, and he has i t bad. Lie has see-n th e elephant, in th a t style, more th a n auy other individual ia America. He is th e champion elephant eeor; in other w’ords he is t h e biggest prophet in the busi­ ness. N o o ther m a n , since Solonu>n» has led so m u c h blushing bride to the altar aa Brigham has. N o m an of ordinary capital and constitution could survive tbe repeated assault of th is unscrupulous 5 ream, and one of these days t h a t elvphant w’ill be too m u ch for Brigham . H e ought to order a few car-loads of divorce from Chicago, so as to defeat his willows’ right of dow e r a n d save s o m e thing for his heii-S in case of his sudden death ; even if it w as no more th a n enough to provide them w ith a few orphan asylum s. H is widows' dower would now cover a b o u t 73 3 of his estate, and th e un fortunate m au is liable to see the elephant a good deal yet. . >Ml it dom mat u t t e r . T h . lotion thoiiM bo oppliod w ith m iyringo o i bo- fO M ? ' * j 111 Hotioo : S y r i a n • o h , her d n h w > 0 doubt Krsmma hod given her nos­ trum for it, and she Lad better go ou doiijr what he advised. 8 he could not g e t w o n * . So I nodded. “ Tho last did no good to my hearino. b o h t h . p i l l . < |r l to o»y h ^ K h . tik r n tb .m »ll. \ o u b a r e uot g„t m m o r . how*, k x n .y , hov. you T” I » U » y . Uke'.'iouer-pOl, with i s . w h r n tns o {From the Glasgow Weekly Hsi'. ] A m o n g th e tbous\nd-am l-on#articles a n d oarat>h!ets cn th e Byron scandal, in p r e p an«i versa, we have saen nothing anproaffP i'.g, f r w i t and pungency, a clever je u d'esw U juifc issued from th e London press. U is en titled “ .L o rd B y rou’* Defence,” and, professing to be w r itten by his Lord- «hio himse!*, i* appropriately dated • iiadea, M D C C C L X IX .” The title page contain# portrait* of L o rd B y ron and Mra. S t o w e — his L o rdship, beautiful as Apollo, being represented as alm o st eclipsing a coarse scandal m o n g enng face intended for th a t of hi* detractor, , , B —- .wum, M s. S t.w e . T h e following ex tr a c ts se- j » M g w i M “ envelope, w h ich I opened looted a t random w ill give our readers a >»reotly t h e door closed n p o n her, expoctin- . . .. > ___ . : _ ’ fi h n J t u r n . I m . . _ _ l i : l T b e nam e of th e author i hl<! 4 i » 't l y th e opposite ten d e n c y : lf.s currency on th e l iterary j 'vhole th<\ \ 7 t h »t th e Bible “ a '1 C h n r tU m ty ; a re consequents of t h e visionary system s of barbarism flies in th e face of an unchange­ able law of nature, whose im m aculacy he feign w ould so m u ch revere. “ A corrupt tree c a n n o t bring forth good f r u i t.” I*. F r a n k l i n J o n h s . [WRtTTKX FOR TUB Hl'KFAl.O BXJ-HX**. A P P E S D I X C O X C E R X fX G D R E A M S . W h e n a dream is dem o ralized into a con- tuough “ Sybaris” docs not contain a tith e i d ition of total depravity i t is c a lled a night- oi w h a t’ c a n be said thereon, y e t w h a t i! does say is practical and to the poiut. In- • lividuaj as well a3 general im p rovem e n t is < like tau g h t in a pleasant fam iliar m anner, an.l 1 key7, tb e theories advanced tak e double weight mare. W h e n the nightm a re catches a fel­ low fiat on his back i t comes down on him K u K lux horde on a paralyzed dar- It assum e s tb e m ost hideous dia- aud inflicts nam eless horrors upor. from the words iu w h ich they are clothed' j s a int and sinner alike. Even th e pure and It is a useful book. Breed, L e n t & Co. have received from the publishing house of .Sheldon & Co., New ! g e n tle Byron was not exem p t from its virfi- ta t ’ons. 1 have an exquisitely sensitive and m o d est old friend w h o is nightly at Y o rk, “ Loasing's G ram m a r School H istory j tacked by a nightm a re, during which he is of the U n ited States. ” T h e talen t and cx- j auCheated by th e horrible im pression t h a t perience of th is historian, whose , j h e is Fiak, jr. If th e i**u OUS WOU! tuld vouches for th e accuracy and value of t h is j 3°y <>“ sh!>Pe of vaiupyre or goblin new claim a n t for public favor in public ! schools are unquestioned, and i t is n o t im ­ probable th a t , aside from th e intrinsic I d —d, he th in k s he m ight e n d u re i t ; but th is is worse than Rar.quo’s ghost, for it “ ha3 speculation in those eyes which i t does m e rits of tlie histoiy, i ts authorship wil* j (riare w ith. ” I t r y to console him by the decide its adoption as a te x t book. Tht range of th e history extends from the R e ­ volution to th e inauguration of President | suggestion t h a t he has a respite during the ! d a y , w h e reas poor F is k him self is obliged j to suffer th a t self-same nightm a re both C H A C T A C n l A fU S T Y . FRl'I T RAISING, SHEEP, CAT TI.E, ETC (I R-JM OCR OWN CORRKSPONUKVr.'l Jam esi Nr rember 14, ISC- ', -hautauqua Coumy »udoffc»«l it to toy vuuuir. who uouncrd upou it w ith t h . .vid ity of . child upon ■ugto-jiluto., awuUoued two p ill, U c h iu d there, and r o i. to go without » .,m g a WOIj upou l i u i i n t Only, on leaving t h . room ample of thia Byrontoque production a t.. . 1 ■“ lira t u n I bvr U W , •liW.t G*«l, Was never o # familiar to my * *r ; Her c-.-nntry wii a land I never trod, Though I travt led often lar and l}emT- They s«y tVat -h-. V * wcmian, that is \du — To women, as a rule, m v verse i* dear. Per ohac oe she* >oms forlorn regie t»«l^ocanty Or else nerfcushand doo-n'tdo his duty. 1 cau’t eonsolo her in the flesh, I Revis-t “ glimp.-etof tl.c mooa to make Mm. Stow - unhap y ; and I shan * L*ttr g> -d men :n these Sr.ad s for woman s sake, So Stowe’may rest in pcac-. I o* I> want To kn -tr whv a!' tiii* troul'le *ne s-lvml I take. I o i-ht hava neettcd one? » moral teacher ; S'unpurtc —but damn this sancumoni ju* Beecher* I never was a moral manM kuo« ^ ^ I did -K-me thinjp* were For Virtu j alwa ‘ W e l i r M U f lU . eri -In I flew t • Venice, ju: s my *oul v And I am rightly punished ; .1:* Stowe, Scnsiti n and o see nity so blending, lint s.-at.ier’d lie* with dirty prod g tity. And made me blac'.cr even than rsolitv. • K.itallis inccsturque judux \she As Horace say*(I ongh: to change her grade: *• Et lr.uhef peregr na \ that to me A comfort'S M v fame nenis no defender. E'en in America, I think thevTl see Tlie falsehood • uttered hy this has? prot. Win/s heap'd upon me such a huge imfignitv With fatuous, fool sh, feminine mdigni Sw e e t to lrr. k - hUul.ing bride a Sweet t-o th-.: • Id n.an d-eani Sweet to the vinrin thoughts . t wc-.t ia hop: of fr edoni to But sweeter far in spite ol pu:.lk: if. IL S. the cheq ie- a He. pr.iflisher will ;«u\ game porfheets befoil'd -.tu liter* husi land's kias, s ..f youtlifi .1 vigor •1 lovo’s new Mis*, the nig.or. hiss audsotne flsptre worth ihe candle, ry scandal. Ry sister! thy sv ‘Where all tui- f. Pun- in the pure r Tby heart .t soul haa parsed away il a.qf.. -•■ hurts ti.ca iu alms of eternal day, troin every earthlv s;-ot. lot. T h e northern p a r t o f :s e x tensively ilcvoted t o fru i t raising, a d along th c shores oi Lake Eric th e prodn-- tion ot grapes, aud, in places, of straw b e - l'ies, is quite large and constantly iucrea ing. T h e m iddle and southern p a r t of t t county is m ore of a stock raising a u d d a ir farm country. C h a u tauqua County butte- is sold largely in New Y o rk, w h e re i t rauki next to tbe famous Orange C o u n ty butter, and is often sold as snch. A s a m a tter of interest to commercial readers I give tbe prices of live stock which have prevailed here for a long tim e past w ith b n t little va­ riation: C a ttle, live w eight, 4 to (> cents; bogs, live w e ight, 8 to 9 c e n ts; sheep, live weight, 4 cents. Before sheep shearing, in •June, wool pelts sell for a dollar a n d a half. A fterw a rds the Bhoarlings bring frem tw e n ty to forty cents. For the past two years t h e m a r k e t price for wool here has been f o rty cents. Sheep have a dignified position in Sunday schools, and there is a great am o unt of sound theology iu w h ieh t h a t favorite eccle­ siastical anim a l ia often used as an illustra­ tion. C h a u tauqua was form e rly a famous vhcep-raisiug c o u n ty, although shepherds, 1 believe, were never used here. A b o u t two years ago though th e r e w a i a fall in the price of wool, and since then our farmers .lave beeu selling and butchering oif t h ti r sheep, and paying greater attention to lairy business. A gentlem a n from Pough­ keepsie, w h o is au extensive sheep dealer, has given m e some few particulars. A dock of his containing 2 bOO sheep lately passed through Jam e s tow n ; they were ac­ companied by tig h t m en, a dog, tw o horses, and sixty-cue head of cuttie. They travelled on an average ten or twelve niles a day. On reaching R a n d o lph he added 5U0 sheep purchased there, and at ilornellsviile 8U0 more. lO f the original llock CG2 w e re bought near Spartansburg, Pa., 225 in Crawford county, P a ., 52t> near Columbus, Pa., aud 822 near Jam estow n. The whole flock of 3S00 cost on an average two dollars an d tw e n ty-five cents a bead. He has since bought a fiock of 800 more near K e n n e d y ville, H a rm o n y aud Elling­ ton, in th is neighborhood, a t prices ranging from one dollar and seventy-tive cents to tw o dollars and seventy-five c e n ts p e r head, lie w ill send his last flock iu double deck cars to Poughkeepsie. A car w ill hold 20 • .sheep, and th e f reight from here to there is about one hundred and tw e u tyFdollars a oar. The gentlem a n is o: th e lirm cf Yelie & H a ight, Poughkeepsie, and they gener­ ally sell the sheep to farm ers in the neigh­ borhood. to find som# direction from th e publi-hcr of Kramme. But ther 9 was nothing b u t a ti ve- pound note ! W h a t was this for ? A sort of retaining fee ? A ««n*H paym e n t on account ? A soothing theory th e n insinu­ ated itse’f into m y m ind: no d o u b t this eccentric b n t extrem e ly sensible lad y had reaped m u ch comfort, im p rovem e n t a n d de­ light from certain articles signed T. i \ ; h ad • c alled at th e office o! one of th o journals | thus e n riched for T. P. a address, and had 1 expressed h e r adm iration and gratitude iu this delicate b u t prac ical m anner. The com p lim ent w o u ld perhaps h a v e been higher |4f she had n o t been so very fond ot pills; J b u t I had no tim e for m inute analysis. I j took t h e num b e r of th e note, and locked it up in a draw e r, and stent in a t W a r again. Lu an hour or so L wa% a g a in disturbed. “ H e re's another for T. P . ; a m an this tim e, all on w ires.” A flop was heard iu tho hall. “ There, t h a t is th e th ir d tim e | he a dropped h:s h a t since I let him in !” | said Betty. \ \ as this rush upon th is signature a practical jo k e ? No ; practical jokes never j r e s u lt in lire pound notes to th e b u tt. A t any rate, I would uot risk th e loss of con- : m but ions so s u b s tantial, though so flimsy, ; b y refusiug to see a n y one w h o desired an j interview w ith m y initials. A m iduleF j ag. d m an, w ith light prom inent eves, tow- j colored hair, smooth face, retreating chin, an d sp ire figure, the j fintsof w h ioh seemed : to have heen stretched upon thc rack, came I ’*“ to th e room at som e thing betw e en a tro t aud a shuffle, tum b led over a chair, begged its pardon aud sat on t h e edge of ifc. ^ “ I ’ve seen w h a t you say in th e p-o-paper. Mr. T. I’., and I th o u g h t yen m ight do mv I n erves good ; so I —I called ; I am so very ; nervous, and th c doctors can’t do any i th in g ,” he said. D so happened t h a t I had w r itten about j 1 imidifcy a short tim e before. H e re was j .m o ther r e a d e r who had tak e n th e trouble | to discover m y address ! I t w '23 flattering, i b u t puzzling. J “ I am very glad.” said I, “ if any l ittle : b ints cf m ine should prove of service to ; you, b u t I fear t h a t 1 cannot a d d anything to wli.it has a p p e ared in p r in t . ” “ O h ,” he cried, “ I beg pardon, I ara sure ; T see you are very b-busy. 1 only th o u g h t . B u t perhaps I h a d b e tter ouv your book.” ( H o w on earth th e perusal of “ The f’o soner of th e Pyrennee.i ” should iu any way brace his nervous system T could not divine ; b u t as it w a s published on the half-profit agrecm eut, it w as n o t for me to point o u t th e im p robability of such a result. So I smiled, and said th a t on the whole it w o uld lie b e tter ; and he shutllo- t rot tod aw a y , dropping h is h a t a n d s tick all about the passage, and apologizing profuse­ ly. I sat down to m v desk again, and w rote a m em o randum for my f u ture biogra­ pher— “ He r e turned from L’aris, a n d found him self famous and th e n took a m ental header into tho wnr-chariota of th e ancient Britons. “ W ell, w h a t is it now, B e tty?” lac k e d when, a couple of hours later she nm-le her th ir d app.-aranee. “ N o t a n o ther for T. I* ?” “ Indeed, but it is, and a young Jadv. Perhaps I had b e tter say you are busy?” ' “ O uy; oak her to come in. W h a t :s she like?” “ [ don’t know; she’s a ll w a le,” r: plied Batty.- W a lk in, pit-ase, mies.” The young lady came in precipitately, rai c u g th e ‘w a le ,’ a nd e xc’aim ing; “ 0 Tun, how could you! If you Lr.e.w- — ” H e r feet aad her tongue were alike arrest* d when she sav/ r.u-; and indeed I was slightly dum b founded myself. For a good-looking young woman w ith really a splendid figure, to rush into your study’, an I address you by 8oinel>ody e lse's C h ris­ tian name, is m o st startling. She was the first to recover from thc surprise which she seemed to feel a t iiuding me in m y own room. “ W h e re is m y husband?” she asked. “ Really, m adam, I have not the rem o test idea,” I replied. “ Oh. do not trifle w ith m e ! ” she e x ­ claim ed. “ Do you fear lest I should betray nuhed s o litude is melaa- holy, and I should him ? Oh, sir, there is no danger of th a t . I certainly feel s trongly tem p ted to disregard am his wife, and I love him though he has avail the words that si iid'-ers Tlie fair escutcheon of tby fame to Curs'd be thc greedy publisher# who gw . e Tina literary jackal lo tt y grave. i care not for myself, my fame i- f*r Beyond tliis dull rev Ier's power to dim. My si-tor shone !*ef. ri- ii.-r a* * star Shine* I'u-e.y o’er the young moon's cr#*cat riiu; .\lie wished our ejmUiiou both to Uir • a itn t « same foul !>• u.-h: ’twas a worthy whim Of h-r who whir, '.▼aslictl hosts of ft tid niggers, To tike such pain* to blacken both our figure*. 'Ti* u i I I awoke oue memorable mom And fouud that I was famous; speedily I knew myself the tar gut for aii .-corn. Men caied uie i famous (the I ord know- why). Wnat iaurels this rr. 'c woman may have wo. 11 now not, but the deed of infamy, lewd, loquacious, ii-entry antic, il blast ILt-m on bot-li sides ol thc Atlantic. i s Tliis. All •: 1 I-i lire on forcve - life become* < r<- utii mu-t fet hore h o u r cri#d L ** And _ P. b c tn pts- ten#d all day with caller* demanding to see T. P.” ** T h e n y o n h a v e n o t t u r n e d q u a c k d o c . to r ? I t h o u g h t s u c h a t h in g impossible. Of c o u f a e . h o w e v e r , I c o u l d i n t r u s t t h e h r pp - aeoB o f m y d a u g h t e r t o n o s u c h f r a u d u b n t im p e a l u r ; n o d t h n i n i t i a l s b e i n g y o n r * , an w e ll a* t h o o d d r e s r , I d e t e r m i n e d to c all at o n c e a u d e e e w b a t i t a l l m e a n t . Of c o u r s e , m y d — r T o m , I a m o v e r j o y e d to find t L t y o n a r e m e r e l y th e v i c t i m o f a s i l l y tr i c k W h ff»r The exclamation was caused by the en ­ trance, at that moment, o f the fair desert* 3. The elder lady drew hereelf up to irer fu.l height, and then stiffened into livn marl-lc. “ Oh, I see,” ahe s a id,” and h e r accent was freesing; “ you thought we were rair a t Scarborough. A fortuuate visit of m ire was this! A narrow escape my poor gitl has had. Good morning, sir.” “ But-, m adam ,\ 1 began. •‘Enough, sir; not a word! F e r m it me to w ithdraw . I am not used to such com­ pany!” ‘ B u t you are m istaken,” I cried. This is Mra. T . P ; she h a s not been in th e hou.*o five m inutes, and 1 never saw her before.\ Before I oould cot any further in my explanation, M rs. T. P. struck in. “ Ob, madam , h o w can you t r e a t w ith such c ruelty a poor distressed woman, who has been k i t by her husband, and” ------ “ E a o j g h ,” said Lucy’s m other. “ Doubt- ’e^s your story is very romantic, b u t it has no in terest for m e.” Aud she moved haughtily to th e itoor, w h o re she brand herself confronted by a oonple c f policemen in uniform aud oue <-ut. “ S o rry t o distress you, ladies,” said the latter, “ b u t duty, you know, is duty, aud m u s t be performed. M r. T im o thy Porter. You are w a n ted. H alloa! This is not our tuan! Slip into th e hall, you two, and see th a t he does not g e t out of the hom e .” “ There is uo one in b u t ourselves and my serv.cit B e tty ,” said 1. 'H iere was a fruitless search and a partial expl .nation, which so far satisfied thy ik tective t h a t he m ade a s o rt of apology ior the intrusion. “ B a t, sir,” he said iu con­ clusion, “ if you are so careless as to k t your bouse to a sw indler, who joins his better-paying trick s to quack-doctoriug, w h a t can you expect?” “ I never let the house,” I replied. “ I w e n t a b road for a holiday, sent m y servant aw a y , and p u t iu a charw o m a n .” “ W h a t is her namu and address?” “ I gave both; aud th e policeman went away, followed bv M rs. T. P., who thanked heaven th a t her rascal husband had es­ caped. (if course, M rs. Grimes, the chirw o m an, had been tem p ted to let T im o thy Porter occupy m y houso in my absence; and I was pestered ior m o n th# w ith indignant letters froiu persons who had scut poxtagt* stam p s for copies of “ The Nerves a n d their V ictim s,” a n d had received nothiug in re turn. G L E A N I N G S . —Belle Boyd ia in an insane asylum . - A p r e tty hood—childhood. — A fresh eruption of V e suvius is feared. -C o n g ress assembles on tho 0 th of De •NTH 1 , * how he will -offer when he’s ii*i lb- bonum,’’ ‘ Do ui irtuis. \ bu'. now • Fu L* w ite foci words; in m There's sonu Jiiujr very dann Enough. I leave n ofjFu: s t-xub ii j h *11 in djinr, 1 the lie I'iliij ami th ,il ta k ior woman's haiid> t<> tr> ifil-irioiit on h woman* • head. i«d soar, eiv dared t*> ; rate Lad 1 0 , : 'in w •■ re’c-r her words are rt ad ■ dares to med I e witli me. iio iroi “D O N 'T L E T I T T MY HOUSE IN KENSINGTON. A lm ost the last w o rds spoken by the good old lady who left me four thousand p rand consols and a hom e 111 h e n sington were : ‘D o n 't let it, Jo h n —live in i t ; i t has been my home for fifty years and more ; your uncle died in it, and my poor girl. I can’t hear t h e 'th o u g h t of strangers coming and ;il-treating th e furniture. Cham b e rs are dear and unwholesome, and I alw a y s think they t.-m p t young m en to keep late hours; tad as for lodgings, you will be skinned in them . You w ili not desert tho old place, will you, Jo h n ?” The house is not a large one, b u t absurdly big for a bacheT-r w ith ny small income to inhabit, nevertheless, if i and my servant L wore m a rion­ ettes, w ith th e power < : shooting off cur a umbers and resetting them at pleasure, m ight lodge a head in one room, an arm another, and so m ake a decent attem p t a general occupation; b u t being ordinary m - ta i s , v e can only m anage tw o rooms ;eee. Now to live in th e m idst of fur- T I I E W O N D E R F U L O JA X T . SCIENTIFIC EXAMINATION BY THE BOARD OF REGENTS. |Fr. m tLe Syracuse Journal, Wednesday.! A t about nine o’clock this m orning the party of scientific visitors to the wonderful liscovety in Cardiff, left ihe V a n d e rbilt H use, accompanied by tbe proprietors i'iie distinguished invited consisted of Chancellor J . V. L. P r u y u , Dr. S. P.. Wooi- w o rth, Professor J a m e s H a ll, Dr. Robinson, if A u b u rn, Judge Clinton, of Buffalo, Judge A. S. Johnson, H o n . George Geddes, E. \V. Leavenw o rth, Dr. il. B. W ilbur, Dr. Strong, Dr. Canfield, Rev. G. M. Ililis, Jam e s Geddes, President W h ite, H . K. W h ite, Dr. Dallas, Dr. H itchcock, if Binghamton, Dr. Boynton, C a p tain Knapp, of A u b u rn, Dennis Brothers, of A u b u rn, representatives of the press of Syracuse, L. H . Redfield, V’. W . Sm ith, aud m any hsra. l'h e day was beautiful, and tb e p a r t y all high spirits. E v e ry facility was afforded by tu e proprietors for a satisfactory exam i­ nation of the great wonder. The ten t was given up solely to their u?.e, a n d the party 7 ere perm itted to avail them selves of all uiy poor dear relative’s dying injunction were it not for tho hope of speedily in creasing m y income and relinquishing my bachelorhood. Betty, let mo hasten to observe, in a con- 1 e 88 *-d forty-five, w as chosen for m s b y tbe mother of m y intended, and is a s alad of tlie virtues; industry, honesty and respectabi­ lity form ing the principal ingredients. 8 he ■a a wulow, w ith one son, a sergeant, who returned to Ply m o u th from ('b ia a last \u g u s t. j u s t as 1 w a s going a b road for a • ouple of m o n ths holidays. So f thought .'iat Betty m ight jui w d l go a n d see her son at the same tim e , a proposition a t which -he fairly c ried w ith pleasure. 1 took ber address, saying th a t 1 w o u ld w r ite he r a word a week before 1 returned (so t h a t she m ight come first and get th e house ready or m - : engaged a char wom an to sleep 011 the premises during our absence, and start- d for >. 'itzeriaod. Only in p assing through Paris, itnck there, as I alw a y s do. A t t > e n d of th e th ir d week 1 found a ii tte r t the Poste Reatante niark-.- i ‘im ­ m ediate, it was from Kramm e, .aad ran ‘-hus: D ear P sny o l in : I have got an order for ;iu historical w o rk; one of those things which Mi lie’s s u b scribers w h o call novels trash think ii deserted me, because I know th e reason: his let*cr told me. He fancied t h a t I should spurn him and cast him off w h en I learned his m isconduct. He was asham ed t a face llT , - , T m e; h e th o u g h t t h a t th e prospect of poverty Vfcre. T h a u k y o u - I do set would m ake m e shrink. A h , he little smo^fc- * i . _ * ______ o ... , t 1 . t l , 1 . cembcr. -K a lam a z o o College, iu M ichigan, has ninety-eight s tudents. — A young J e w e s s h a s been running away w ith a m ale Catholic iu San Francisco. - The altar of St. S tephen’s ( hurch, New Y o rk, cost $00,000. —Sixteen thousand children atten d the public schools at St. Louis. — Apple b u t te r boilings are the country sport iu Pennsylvania. — Boston is to have a congress of all the one hundred mile pedestrians in the coun­ try . —Canada has an enrolled m ilitia force nnm lteriug 056,066 men. — Ostriches’ b rains are to be one of tho dishes a t the S u ltan’s dinner to Eugenie, of which the tabic w a ic alone will c o » t$ uo,- UW. —There are 430 species of h u m m ingbirds, and they are found only on tho W estern continent. —N ew fashioned e a r rings arc m ade of Komau gold to represent bells, birds, cage:*, hoops and linked stars. ■—A relic h u n ting French C a n a d ian lias paid tea dollars for a pair of Prince A r thur’.* old boots. —A n attem p t was recently made to blow up a powder m anufactory in Belgium. —There are eighteen newspajKirH in the U n ited Slates edited by females, and only one is in favor of woman suffrage. —Tho Coliseum^is outdone by tho build­ ing for the Macon, Georgia, fair. That structure is 720ffeet long. A philosophical instrum e n t m aker in London s tates t h a t a regular am i profitable branch of hi.i trade iB the sale of spirit rap­ ping m agnets a n d batterios. Polite smoker, a t side of railw a y car: “ Allow me to assist you to alig h t.” knew me. Surely ho m u s t have spoken to j you of mo ?” “ I assure you th a t T c a n n o t believe in th e possibility of any husband leaving you of hia own f.-ee choice,” said L gallantly. “ B u t th e r e is some m istake here. M ay I ask his name ?” “ VYhy, T im o thy Porter, of course, sir !” “ I really do not know any one of th a t nam e, m a d a m .” “ Oh, you are playing npon words, and trifling w ith me .' B u t afkiy the trouble 1 have had to trace him 'to t^is house, and th e m any w e a ry miles h&ce traveled to reach it, am n o t to be \lightly turned aw a y . T w id search e v e ry corner, sir; yes, every corner.” I t was beautiful to see bow the expres­ sion of her features passed from softness to extrem e firmness, and I gazed on her w ith an adm iration n o t unm ixed w ith apprehen­ sive awe. W a s th is injured la.ly excep­ tional or typical ? was it w ithin t h e bounds ■f p robability t h a t my dearest Lucy would c p roving yoa know. Such a f e v e r assum e t h a t tone’ after t h e boats were title we : ave h it on: “ W a r, W o m en a n d ' - - - - - W ine!” Now, w ill you tak e W a r ? You | will give an a c count of all th e principal wars tha* have ever been waged. Sacred wars: SDge of Troy, H e le n , W ooden Horse, W ars of th e Roses, etc., down to Prussia vsraus A u s tria. T h e re m u s t be plenty cf thrill and romance. You can have the us . Gf three encyclopedias, Hum e, • r a n t and Napier. As the book m u s t be • ■ut soon a?t€r C h ristm a s, perhaps you had better come back to ixindon and eet to w r k at once.” sent off three letters im m e d iately; one to the char:, oman in charge of my house; one to B e tty; r.ne to Kr.nume accepting his offer, and promising to r e tu r n in a v. tek ; and nine day n afterw a rds I was s itting in ray s tudy, fenced a b o u t w ith gigantic eno i b u rne d b e h in d ue ? “ should not w o n d e r if jie w e re in this very n e x t room,*’ continued m y fair visitor, going to t h e folding-door v h i c h separated my study from tlie unused dining-room. “ Ah, locked! This is Suspicious. W c shall soon see.” She took the key frem nail close by, and let herself into th e dining-room . It seemed useless to talk to her, eo I sat despairingly down in m y chair, aw a iting th c r e s u lt of her investigations in bew ilder­ ed stlpnce. H e r dining-rooip search proved a blank, and she w e n t up s tairs. P r e s e n t­ ly afterw a rds heard th e front door bell, aud B e tty came again, “ A n o ther for T. P., Betty? Semi him or her away. I ’ll sec no m o re.” — Before Jietty could re/dy^ a well known clopedias, w o rking a t m y s trange h a s h w ith j voice exclaimed : “ No, Mr. Penyolin ; not the vigor which a spell of idleness im p a rts. ; a n o ther for T. P .; b u t one who Las called B e tty p u t her head in. a t the door, ar.d j to a»-k why you have adnptcn those initials, — T h e Lean Wolj is the name of a news­ paper ju s t started in Wisconsin. The L>’* (Jirajje m Raleigh, N . C., has suspended. — T h e rem a ins of Beau H ickman, once a very im p o rtant m an about W ashington, ire traveling around th e streets of Baltimore, picking up an occasional quarter. —A paper publishes tho following erra­ tum : The words printed pig.* a ud coir* in M r. Parker's letter on the laud question, which appeared in yesterday’s issue, should have been pros and cons. — “ R o b e rt .Stewart, native Canadian, ' in th e M uskegon papers, challenges any man in t h e U n ited S tales to roll a log for $25 to $1500 a side. — H . H . Van Dyck, form erly th e Assis­ tan t T reasurer of the U nited States in New York, had his collar bone broken in the recent a c cident on th e Oswego and Syracuse Railroad. ;rant, and ia l i t e “ T h e Field Book of th e j “ •«*■' <lay- R e v o lution,” m a rked by accuracy of state- | m e n t and thoroughness of research, illustrations, w h ich are num erous, are m&ny of them eith e r th e originals or dim- inished copies of those in t h e “ F ield Book j d ace somnam bulism. Som nam bulism .s of th e R e v o lution,” and are in th e m ain ! the h a b it of nocturnal prowling, vulgar.v M y friend refuses to be comforted, and T h e j he w ill probably die a victim to th e te r r i ­ ble hallucination. Dreams are sometimes so vivid as to in- gocd. though some c f th c portraits are not distinguished either for fidelity of likeness I c alled sleep-walking. Its subjects delight ' to scale ro tten rafters, infirm eaves and or artistic engraving. In subject m a tter ■ to p p ling bridges. T h e y are scaly custom- and in i ts arrangem e n t for study, m a rked j ers and th e y sleep xvitd both eyes open. Total ........................ In four w a rds—th e .Seventh, h E ighth, Eleventh and’T h ir tecn th —we h a r e elected T h e Indiana R e p u b licans w ill probably j S u p ervisors V*here we loifc our A lderm e n , hold th e ir S tate Convention in Indianapolis and in on*-, tb^ T w e lfth, we e le c ted an Al- on t h e 22d of F e b ruary. I t will, as usual, M e rm a n nd lo s t b o th Supervisors. The m a k e the cam p aign a long one, b u t we be- ! m o st splendid ru n m a d e w a s th a t of Mr. lieve th e D e m o crats have already decided to h«ld th e ir s in J a n u a r y . Stephen dcQ a a d e , in th e E ig h th W a rd, hey sometim es rush iuto danger, ever. I once caught one of these nocturnal au d exhaustive w ork is , p row lers in th e ac t of ravishing m y h~n- Discovery of th e G reat j reoat. A f ter a vioient effort, in w h ich I improvement# over a n y oi its predecessors ! are a p p a rent. A n able P a rkin ail's the : .ppuances < said t h a t a lady w a n ted to see me, and my engaged heart jum p e d ; but rem em b ering th a t B e tty knew my L a c y and her m o ther and would not annonuce either so vaguely, it subsided auaia. P e r b p it wa e a partrrer in W a r, V. #inen a n d W ine, come to m ake arrangem ents a b o n t th c division of labor. “ L e stw a y s,” said B e tty, “ she asked for T. P.; and as them ’s your initials, and she oome to th is hou»<3 I suppose she m eans you.\ ‘ A ll r ight. B e tty, s h o w her ia , ” said I, j «ure now th a t she had come on business, I R r I sign all my w o rk T. P. There entered a t a l l lady w ith a Kreat m u test notion w h a t she m e a n t deal of bone about her, srp a r a lled w onder- | reply w as to place her •JLa mnci. h&Vd l.«».4 I.... ... * . - r , ■ to determ ine the interesting questions per­ taining to th e origin and nature Stone Giant. 'I he definite and official decisions of th e seieuLfic party w ill be m ade know n in due lime. W e oa . o n ly gather up a few of th e | a large bag on one a rn , and a tent, incidents of the occasion and th e express- and w h a t is th e m eaning of ihia advertise­ m ent ?” And th e imposing form cf the m o ther of my intended sw e p t into th e room, holding a new spaper ii> h e r hand. “ Oh, my dear m adam , I so glad to sec you !” cried . th o u g h t you w e re a t Scarborough.” “ W c were a t Scarborough, h u t have re­ tu r n 'd sooner thau 1 expected. B u t th a t has nothing to do w ith th e explanation dem and. tS h a t is the. m eaning o f th is ad ­ v e rtisem e n t ?” I declared w ith t r u t h th a t I. had never | a d v e rtised in m y life, and bad not the re- H e r only w s p s p e r in my A pen-and ink m a rk in th c m argin directed my attzm tion to th e following: “ I he licensed homicides who decim a te . . . i n a tio n under th e titieK of Physician, one w e n t to China, and gave the native tJurgeon, or G e n e ral P ractitioner arr tailors old nones for patterns. She carried j g a n tly call a “ \ \ f the cheiniac and geologist, j fully. 8116 m u st hav e Lad b o n n e ts an d j h and . dresses enough to last her life m ade w h e n th e | she was about fifteen, for I am sure she could n o t get tliem cut like t h a t now unless lously contrived to open and sh u t like cu mons dropped in fam iliar conversation over J u m b rella, in the o ther h a n d . J rose, bowed, this gigantic w o n d e r of a form er age. | a n d offered her a chair; she s tared a t me a# In respect to th e views of tn e scientific , though she w a n ted to send me off into p a rty , there ia an almost unanim o u s o n- I m esm eric s lum b e r, an- proceded to remove currence in th e opinion th a t it is a statue. ! h e r roof, for to call her top coverin'' a W e s t.” Tne book is w r itten w ith th e ! received a black eye and surrendered some object of investigating the discovery of th e | o f m y hair, I succeeded in aw a k e n ing th e valleys of th e M ississippi aud th e G reat Lake-, w h ich is a portion of our history h ith e r to very obscure. Those m agnificent regions w ere revealed to the world through a series of daring enterprises, of which tlie m o tives, and even th e incidents, have been who is e e c ted b y 1*25 m a jority, although I b u t partially and superficially known. The th e W a rd gives a n average Dem o c ratic ma- j chief a c tor in them , Ko yb ye ert Cavelier, better U p t u r n s from ninety-one counties in 1 jo rity of abo£t 290. M r. M cQuade ecu : tnra f/ive G o v e rnor M e rrill 29,012 m a j o r - . tLe-chaiopiunaLip. I R rt ■ k n o w n c« La Salia, w l V l m u ch but printed * I n o thing, an i th e published w ritings . som n a m b u list—to a sense of his danger — and persuaded him to accom p any me before a m a g is trate. W h e n th a t dignitary had heard m y narrative, he inquired of th e for- aging p a r t y w h a t his p lea was. “ S om nam ­ bulism ,” w as th e reply. “ Some vhat queried Solon, w ith sym p tom s of bewilder- men;. “ S u m n a m b u lism /’ repeated the unhappy dream e r. “ Some namby —oh ! I J s e e ,” says judicial wisdom, smoothing iu Some of them expreseed the opinion t h a t it was transported t o ita present locality by forces of w a ter vurrents in a d istan t age. The impression of m assiveness is made upon the rn m d t h a t could not be obtained from descriptions. I t is p r e t t y well determ ined t h a t th e ma* bonnet w o u ld be realiv t<.o a b surd, j “ W h e re's th - “ t h e r ? ” ahe suddenly . aaked. j T h e ^ other ? T h a t m a s t probably bn I K ram m e ; she had evid«nt l j had an intcr- ! view w ith him on the subject of the work, and expected to find him terial is gypseus, hue no decided expression m orning. I explained to her t h a t Kramm, is yet m ade as to th e tim e w hen or by w hom I was probably a t hom#, w o rking aw a v or for w h a t purpose th e s tatu e was carved, j h is section. Tne p a rty ail agree upon th e w o n d e rful : nature of the image, and regard it as snsj- ! you know gcsting very m any q u e stions t h a t will afford j growled. W h a t is the use of talking to me when th a t I am stoa# deaf all those Professors of th e A r t of Healing w h o refuse to conform to their j a n tiquate an d inetftcacecuit rules, Quacks. \ et, a traveler, who has lately returned | from t h e w ilds of Grim T a r taiy , where Ire : has learned th e m arvellous curative lore of : th e Bofihea, posses.'en some m iraculous 1 secrets for th e cure of all disease# arising ! from the disorganization of the reticular in* ! *' r lineatioa cf the Nerve*. W h a t i s Blind- ■ i.e-ss ? Paralyzation of th e Optic Nerves, j W b a t is Deafness ? P rostration of the , Nerves oi th e Ear. This Benefector of En- , ; rope has i.ured thousands oi th# blind and rith mo th a t 1 deaf whose cases have been declared H o l ­ ies* by t h e Faculty. As for Neu *algia, Tic D o u lou^ux, R h e u m a tism , St. V itus’ Dance, W inking, S tarting a t Sudden ir* 1 > c 1 had not know n i t ; I had not heard of h e r existence, even. I t wa# r e r y rem iss of „____h v ________g 0 ____ r . Kram m e not to tell m# of th i s fellow la- sition in th e case A m arvelous form, ‘ b o rer and h e r peculiarities. A f ter trying - - . — V. *■ L . - — L - _ J 1 : ____ 1. - r _ — I * _ : . — — n « . . „ na/>atoi to i? L L - . I ___ ample opportunity lo r scientific discussions, j No one for a m o o:ent e n te r ta i n s ^ t h e I thought t a t t h e r e is a n y hum b u or im po- w rought b y artistic hands, lies before us im bedded in th e deposit fcr centuries. A careful ev am in at ion of tnro, of o 01 • renal, 01 ot water-upoi. i t *,n c h a n n eling out farrow s j *n the lim b s and feet, w ill e n a b le th* » ien- vain to com m u nicate w ith h e r by sign#, I w rote : “ I n w h a t w a y esc I be of eor- ih e style of sculp- j vice t o yon ?” on a bit of | the erosive effect ‘ ed it to her. Poper, and Land- she restoration of a ll persons so afflicted to th« healthy nervous statue of t h e ploughm an and th e m ilkm a id. A d d ress T. P ., 1 Blank Terrace, Kensington. N. B .—T . P . ’s in­ valuable w o rk, ‘ T h e N e rves and their V ic tim s,’ ia n o w ready. To be had of all book f i l e r s , price htlf-a-crow n ; or d irect from th e A u th o r by sending, thirty-fi s u b s to hi# a d d ress.” I 1 iboed m y eyes, snd stated in worn! —An em inent physician- says th a t the w h ite rubber used for nursing bottles and infant’s toys is very poisonous, causing sore un-utb, slim eruptions, decayed teeth, spi­ nal curvature, and death. In Europe tiie sale of it i 3 prohibited by law. —Due cold W inter nig h t some tw e n ty - live years ago a couple a p p e a red under the window of a squire 111 W a s h ington County, New Y ork, and called for him . The squire got out of bed and asked w h a t they wanted. “ W a n t to g e t m a r r ied.” “ M a r­ ried and l»e darn e d ,” s a id th e squire, and sh u t the w indow. I t w as a s h o rt ceremony, b u t th e y considered it sufficient, anu arc living together a s m an and wife. —M r. Sim p k ins has a n abom inable gait, don’t yon t h in k so ?’V ‘No, in d e e d .' 1 think it quite handsom e , especially since it waa p a in ted .” “ Excuse me, b u t you don’t u n ­ d e rstand me—I allude to his carriage. ” “ W h y , l a m e ! he ha# no c a rriage. ” “ Ob, yea, he has; b u t it# only seen w h -t. h - w a lks.” — W a shington w a s fond of horses, and in a private letter, w ritten in 1785, showed how fam iliar he wa# w ith them . A lluding to tho persistent dem a n d s of po r tr a it p a in t­ ers, he said : “ A t first f was as im p a tn-nt a t th e request, and as restive under tho operation, as a colt is of th e sari d ie. The n e x t tim e I subm itted very r e luctantly, but w ith less flouncing. Now no d r a y horse moves more readily’to th e th ill t h a n I do to the painter’s chair.” —M r. W illiam Cullen B ryant is r e p o rted to have given th e following advice to a young new spaper c o n tributor : “ M y young friend, I observe t h a t you have used several French expressions iu your a rticle. I think if you will s tudy the English language th a t you w .ll find it capable of expressing all thu idea# y o u m ay have. I have alw a y s found it so, aud in all th a t I have w r itten I < a-: not recall an ins*ance w h e re I was tem p ted to use a foreign w ord, b u t th a t , on sear.-b- ing, I found a better oue in my ow n lan ­ guage.” —The correspondent of th e London Lancet, signing him self “ R u s tic u asks w h e ther any one can *a,’- geot a rem e d y for internal pa 1 i.s suffered by a gentlem a n who i# » p a ­ tien t of his. Ho has a lready a d m inistered w ithout effect several preparations < f opium, belladonna, c a n n abis findica, ipeca­ cuanha, assafectida, valerian, chloric, e ther, chloroform vapor, bromide of pot##«*iut.i, quinine, beherine, iron, zinc, hydrocyanic acid, bism u th, antacids, pepsin, pancreat­ ine, hot drink# and eth e r remedies. H e has a!#o tried galvanic c u rrents, h o t fomw - tations anil cold c loths, hot baths, mu.sta I ponlticeK, c roton oil, and small blisters t. - tcrnaliy; also, subcutaneous injectiu. a < i m orphia, atropine, • rychnia, and caffein . “ Kasticus” certainly appears to have doue bis best, but, i f we m ay b# allowed to m ake a non-medical suggestion, we w o uld recom ­ m end t h s t th# ■offerer be let alone, a t rJl events for a tim e ; i t would rath e r be su - prising if h e were not uncom fortable at pre­ sent. - E j . - , . _ * - . v w w s ' - 1 - Vto • \ — — 1 toto.—- * A b, sa;a she, ‘A c a n n o t read i t with- ! s t n 7 proposed m o ther-in !sw, who tt; j —Tney have a model < o !lector of *—les, 1 — -*■'* * K • ' adicial attitu d e . I tom s a t F o r t H u ron, M ichigan. Gu .. u ; spectac an d 1 hav# Jeft nQjct; !

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