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Man. (New York [N.Y.]) 1878-????, November 01, 1880, Image 6

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14 MAN. [November 1st, 1880. EX P L A NA T IO N S . Cincinnatus, of Rome, emerged from retirem ent only when hi: country was in peril, and his countrymen called loudly for his services. So M a n , after the election of last year, failed to hear a distinctive call to the field. His retirem ent was not to be perm anent, however. The Liberal League need him and find him ready for the fray. W hen saints like W right and Pillsbury, and pure heros of the stamp ofW akem an, Parton and Leland become the victims of jealous slurs, foul aspersions and vile abllse, such as has burdened the public press since the 18 th of September, it is time for M a n to come to the rescue. Dropping for the present the allegorical, I have to say, that my affairs having become too deeply embarrassed, I found it expedient to drop the publication of M a n in December last, and that of the E v o l u t i o n in April. My affairs, with the assistance of powerful friends, have been so far adjusted that the S c i e n t i f i c M a n and E v o l u t i o n are absolutely guaranteed for regular publication until January 1 st, 1882 . W e must rely upon the efforts of our subscribers for the elements of a perm anent and complete success. This work is mainly a missionary or educative work, and educators were always poorly paid. Missionaries are seldom welcome, and they must have support from home. The response to the first issue of M a n was hearty enough to show that man has his place in the breasts of the Liberals. The monthly publication is guaranteed by the Liberal League, and they are responsible editorially and otherwise for one number per month. O rce a m o n th we desire to treat our readers to one of Mrs. Bes m t’s Essays, not as yet published in America. Once a month we wish to print an article on Anthropology, Ethnology and Archaiology in recognition that “ The proper study of mankind is m a n .” Once per month also in M a n we desire to print some leading essay upon sanitary and medical reform. And we desire to give a brief synopsis of the news of the week, which most concerns M a n , and especially the L i b e r a l M a n . W h ether we succeed in all our desires for this paper is for its other friends largely to determine. Our part will be to deserve, and theirs to appreciate. In its League issue at 25 o. nts, it is certainly within the reach of 100,000 American Liberals. In its weekly issue at $ 1.00 per year, it will richly repay all who may save from their tobacco and liquor bills the small sum of 2 cents per week. For clubbing rates, See., see our advertising pages, and address promptly, ASA K. B U T T S , 13 Dey Street, New York. M a n y of our enthusiastic friends, in their admiration for these lectures for the people, have expressed their fear that the supply would soon run short. We take this occasion to reassure thern that the stream is really perennial. We give herewith a partial list of those we have just received, which were delivered last season in Manchester and other places in England. We shall publish them as fast as we can, and in I such order as may the least interfere urith another very interesting series of illustrated articles, entitled Physics W ithout Apparatus, the first number of which will appear in the next number of the S c i e n t i f i c M a n . The following is partial list of the new lectures: Islands, as Illustrating the Laws of the Geographic Distribution of Animals, by A rthur R Wallace, F.It.G .S., F.L.S. The Age of Dragon ;, by E. Waterhouse Hawkins, E .G . 8 . Palestine in its P h y sical Aspects, by Canon Tristman, L.L.D .F.R .S. Traps to Catch Sun­ beams, by Capt. W, De W. Abney, F .R .L ., R E. Edison and some of his inventions, by Prof. Barrett, P .R .S ., R.E. Our Earliest Ancestors I 11 Britain, by Prof. Boyd Dawkins, M.A., F.R .S., F.S.A. The Modern History of Gunpowder, by Prof. Abel, C.B., F.R.S. Minute Forms of Life, by Rev. W. II. Dallinger, F.R.M .S. Animal Intelli­ gence, by George S. Romanes, Esq., M .A., F.L.S. The Popular Health Lectures will he published in our other periodical M a n . TH E FOLLOW ING W ILL A P P E A R IN “ M AN.” Long Life, and the Causes that prevent it; By A rthur Ransome, M IT. M.A. W ork and Recreation in their relation to Health; By S. Hoi gate Owen, M.D. Defective Drainage as a Cause of Disease; By John Makinson Fox. Good Nursing, and its Importance in the treat­ ment oi ! ' use; By J. A. Irw in, M.A., M.D., &c. The Loss of V,' MiL by 1 loss of Health; By John W atts, Ph.D. How a Tenant may keep his Cottage Healthy and Comfortable; By J. Corbett. POPULAR SCIENCE. List of Loctures already issued in press for Vol. II., S c i e n t i f i c M a n No. 1. The Health of the Household. By Henry Simpson, M.D. No. 2 . The Crime of Vaccination. By Prof. Alexander Wilder. No. 3. Adulteration of Food. By C. Estcourt, Esq., F.R.S. No. 4. W hy Little Children Die. By II. II. Vernon, M.D. No. 5. Kent's Cavern. By W illiam rengelly, Esq., F.R.S. No. 0. The Time that has Elapsed since the Era of the Cave Men of Devonshire. By Win, Pengelly, Esq., F.R.S. No. 8 . The ()rigin of the English People. By Prof. A. S. W ilkins, M. A. No. 9. Modern Savages. By Sir John Lubbock Bart, M. P., E.R.S No. 10- Epidemic Delusions. By Dr. Carpenter, I R.S. No. 11. Harvey and the Circulation of the Blood. By Prof. Huxley, F .R .S No. 12. Muscle andNerve. By Prof. Arthur Gamgee, M.D., F.R.S. No. 13. The Functions of the Brain. By Prof. Ferrifer. M.D. No. 14. The Beginnings of Life. By Prof. P. Martin Duncan, F.R.S. No. 15. The same, Part I t, by the same. No. 1 G. Astronomy. By Prof. Proctor, and Scientific Feeding, By Prof. Wilder. No. 17. Flame. By Prof. T .E . C. Thorpe. No. 18. Flame, P a r tI I . By Prof. T. E. C. Thorpe, F.R .S. No. 19. Earthquakes and Volcanoes. By Prof. W. C. Williamson, F.R .S. No. 20. Heredity. By Wiley Britton. No. 21. Modern Discoveries in Sound. By Prof. T. II. Core. No. 22. Second Lecture on Sound, by the same. No. 23. How to Live Well on a Sixpence a Day. By Dr. T. L. Nichols, of London. No. 24. The Cruise of The Challenger. By John Murray, F .R .S.E . No. 25. Second Challenger Lecture, by the same. No. 20. Palestine Explorations; The Ancient and Modern Water Supply of Jerusalem. By Major Wilson, R .E., F .R S. Nearly every number is illustrated, and contains besides lectures as above recent Notes of Science. Price 2 cents per number or the 26 nos. for 50 cents, sent postpaid by A S A K . B U T T S , 13 D e y S tre e t, N . Y . TH E SC IENTIFIC MAN.. PRINCIPAL CONTENTS OF VOL. I. ? 8 ». 1.—Description and List of Lectures.............„„..................................... p*** Elementary Chemistry, by Professor Roscoe, F.R.S. Lecture I.—Inde­ structibility of Matter and of Energy........................................................ “ t Parasites^ and Their Strange Uses, by T. Spencer Cobbold, Esq., M.D., No. 2 .—Elementary Chemistry,, by Prof. Roscoe. Lecture i i .—Chemical Com­ bination ........................................................................................................... « ? Sea Serpent Explained.................................................... .. ................................ u 13 Societies and Academies..................................................................................... “ 12 . No. 3.—Early Man m North America, by Prof. Grote ............................................. u 1? Lecture III., by Prof. Roscoe ........................................................................... “ SI Scientific Notes (in nearly all following numbers) ........................................ “ H No. 4.—Elementary Chemistry, by. Prof. Roscoe. Lecturo IV............................ “ 25 No. 5.—Zoology,or Four Plans of Animal Creation,by T.Alcock,M.D. Lecture I “ 3b Artificial Mirage ............................................ “ S 8 No. 6 .—Zoology, or Four Plans of Animal Creation. Lecture I I ............... . “ 41 No. T.—Zoology, or Four Plans of Animal Creation. Lecture I I I ...................... 11 49 No. 8 .—Zoology, or Four Plans of Animal Creation. Lecture IV ................. . “ S7 No. 9 .—The Natural History of Paving Stones. By Prof. Williamson, F.R.S. “ 66 No. 10.—Flame. A lecture by Prof. Core ...................................................... .......... “ T3 No. 11.—A Lecture by Prof. Tyndall, F.R.S., on “ Crystalline and Molecular Forces” ................................................................................................................. “ si No. 12.—On Coal: Its importance in “ Manufacturesand Trade,” by Professor W. S. Jevons, M. A.............................................................................................. • 89 No. 13.—On Coal. A lecture by W. Boyd Dawkins, Esq., M.A., F.R.S., F.G.S. 97 No. 14.—An article by Prof. W. Stanley Jevons, on “ The Amusements of the People,” .............................................................................................. u 105 No. 15.—John Dalton and his Atomic Theory. A lecture by Prof. Roscoe * 113 No. 16.—More about Coal. How Coal and the Strata in which it is found were Formed. With illustrated diagrams. By A. H. Green, M.A., F.Q.St “ 121 No. 17—On Coal Colors, by Prof. Roscoe “ 129 No. 28—The Ice Age in B ritain, by Pr^ f. G e ikie, F.R . S “ 1S7 No. 19—C o ral an d Coral Reefs, by Prof. H u x ley, LL.D., F.R.S., New Guinea, by Alfred R. W allace “ 145 No. 20—The T e m p e rature and L ife of th e Deep Sea, by Dr. W. B. Car­ p e n ter, F .Ii.S “ 253 No. 21—S p e c trum A n alysis, by Prof. Roscoe, “ 161 No, 22—Spectrum A n alysis in its Application to th e Heavenly Bodies, by \V H u g g ins, LL.D., D.C.L., F R .S “ 169 No. 23—T wo L e c tu res on E lem e n tary Physiology, by John Edward Morgan, M.D . . ............. . ............................... “ i?7 No. 24—T h ir d L e c ture by J o h n E d w a rd Morgan, M.D ................... “ 185 No. 25—io u r t h L e c tu r e , “ “ “ “ ................................. “ 193 No. 26—On t h e Sun, ( I llu s tr a ted ,) by J . N. L o c k y e r, Esq.! F.R. 8 ...!!!! “ *01 No. 27—-Yeast, by Prof. H u x ley .................................................... ................ . “ 209 No. 28—The Food of Plants, by Prof. O d ling ................................................ u 217 No. 29—The Progress of S a n itary Science, by Prof. Roscoe ..................... u 225 No. 30—How Flowers are Fertilized, by Alfred W . Bennett, M.A., B.Sc., F .L .S .......... ........................................................................................... 1233 No. 31—Food, by Prof. A rm s trong ....................................................... ‘211 No. 32—The Interior of the E a rth, Prof. Crookes’ E x p erim ents, e tc ‘240 No. 33—The M igration of Birds, by P rof. August W eissm ann ................ “257 No. 31—The Barbarism s of Civilization, by Prof. F. W . Newm an “ 265 No. 35—Anim al Mechanics, by S. M. Bradley, Esq., F.R .C .S ................ “ 273 No. 3 6 - 0 irnivorous Plants, by EHico H o p k in s ............................. .. “ 281 No. 37—Electrical Discoveries of .Faraday, by W . F . B a rrett, E s q . . . . “ 289 : No. 38—The Life of Faraday, by»Dr. J . H. Gladstone, F .R .S ................ “ 297 ; No. 33—P a r e Air, an d it s Influence upon H e a lth, b y A. Ransom e,M . A., M.D., Professor of Hygiene and Public H e a lth, Owens College, and E x am iner m Hygiene, Cambridge U n iversity........................... “ 305 No. 40—The Rainbow (w ith drawings) by Prof. Roscoe, F R .S “ 313 No. 41—The Sun and the E a rth, b y Prot. Balfour Stew art, F . R . S . . . . “ 321 No. 42—Geographical D istribution of Mammals, by T. L. Sclater, Esc. M.A., F .R .S ............................................. . ................................... t “ 329 No. 43—The Birds o f tho Globe, by R . Row d ier Sharpe, F . L . S “ 337 No. 44—A tom s,by P r o f . Clifford, M . A .......................................................... “ 344 No. 45—-How the Body M ay bo Influenced by the M ind in Sickness and H ealth, b y H e n ry Simpson, M . D .............................................. “ 158 No. 46—G u n C o tton, b y F . A. Able, Esq., F . R . S ................................... “ 361 No. 47—Soap Bubbles by P rof. B u e k e r ........................................................... “ 869 ; No, 48—The Star Depths, by P rof. R ichard A . Proctor ........................... “ 377 No. 49—Science and iEsthetics, by Prof. A. R. G roto ............................... “ 885 No. 50—Polarisation of Light, b y ¥ m . Spottiswoods, F .R .S .................. “ 393 No. 51—The Genesis, b y Prof. Croom Robertson, M .A ............................. “ 401 No. 52—The Unconscious Action of the Brain, by D r. Carpenter, F .R .S. “ 409 Any of the above can he sent p repaid for 2c. eaph, 52 (1 of each) for $1.00, four o f each, (208 in all) for $3.00, 10 of each, (520 in all.) $6.00. Vol. I, hound (consisting of above Lectures and several hundred in­ teresting and reliable “ Scientific Notes,”) in full cloth, ornamented sides, gilt stamp and trimmed edges, w ith or without advertising pages, by mail, prepaid, $1.50. Club rates on bound volumes same as above on the unbound, with postage added, 4 copies bound, com­ plete, $4,50; 10 copies bound, complete, $9,00.

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