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Auburn journal and advertiser. (Auburn, Cayuga Co., N.Y.) 1834-1848, September 16, 1846, Image 1

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AUBURN JOURNAL AND ADVERTISER UY OLIPHANT ] AUBURN, CAYUGA CO., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1846. NEW YORK A D V ’TS. ^ V ^ T f O U N D R Y A N D P R I N T E R ’ S f u r . v i s h i w g w a r e h o u s e . m o P R I N T E R S . T H E S u b s c r i- I BURS have o p ened a new Type Foundry in r t i T n W o f N e v r Y o r k , w h e r e t h e y a r e r e a d y t o s u p p l y o r - j to’a n v e x t e n t f o r a n v k i n d o t J o b o r F a n c y T y p e , a n d rv a r t i c l e n e c e s s a r y for a P r i n t i n g O f f i c e . cvt ? . tv n \ w i u c u a r e c a = t i n n e w m o u l d s , f r o m a n e n t i r e - , ; \t o f m a t e r i a l s , w i t h d e e p c o u n t e r s a r e w a i r a n t e d not to b e .-u r p a s s e d b y a n y , a n d w i n b e s o l d a t p r i c e s t o SUp r ' n m y n r r c s s e 3 f u r n i s h e d , a n d a l s o S t e a m E n g i n e s o f ^ m a c h i n i s t i s c o n s t a n t l y i n a t t e n d a n c e t o r e p a i r B a a a r r n m s m s 3»»no6 6 8 A r m - s t . . N e w - Y o r k . O T I C E .—An E l e c ti o n op D i ­ r e c t o r s o f t h e Auburn & Owasco Canal Com- ' w i l l b e h e l d a t t h e A m e r i c a n H o t e l i n t h e v i l l a g e o f K - r ’rn o n T h u r s d a y t h e 1 6 t h d a y o f J u l y n e x t a t U o ’- i ' M — D a t e d J u n e 2 9 , 1 8 4 6 . B y o r d e r o f t h e B o a r d o f p f r e c w r s . H . B A L D W I N , P r e s ’t p r o t e r n . M . P . B c b n k t . S e e ’t y . _____________________________ H t d S A S H A N D b l i n d f a c t o r y . :l T h e s u b s c r i b e r h a v i n g p e r m a n e n t l y v e s t a b l i s h e d h i m s e l f i n t h e t o w n o f L p c K e , i C a y u g a C o . , i n t h e m a n u f a c t u r e o f f c - s f H S W i d i w in d o w Sash & B lin d s , no W p r e p a r e d to f u r n i s h t h e m i n e v e r y v a r i i S ^ o f thebestkinds and ofthe cheapest rates. Having r e c e n t l y p r o c u r e d n e w m a c h i n e r y , h e i s e n a b l e d t o m a n u - f v - t u r e B L I N D S , o f a g r e a t l y s u p e n o r q u a l i t y , a n d a t l o w o r n r i r e s th a n e v e r b e t o r e . . He has also m achinery f o r tenoning and m o rbcem g doors, which cost m o re than a hundred dollars, and does “ work in a style to com p are w ith its value—each tenon e x a c r f v fittin g i i m o r t i c e . A l l p e r s o n s b u d d i n g o r o v e r s e e i n -'la r g e b l o c k s , s u c h a s T a v e r n s , S t o r e s , F a c t o r i e s , A c . A c i r e in v i t e d to d i r e c t t h e i r a t t e n n o n t o t h i s s n o p , a n d th e v W i l l b e s u p p l i e d w i t h t h e a b o v e a r t i c l e , m a d e o f g o o d m n e a n d i n t h e b e s t o f w o r k m a n s h i p . r - S ^ M e r e h u n t s a u d o t h e r s , wishing to sell on commis­ s i o n W ill b e f u r n i s h e d u p o n t h e b e s t t f r m s ; . . . Jobbers and builders will find it to their advantage to rr.il. t'l ardor, by mail o r o therw ise prom p rlv a-tvr,d-:d to. Ihrecr tu Locke, P. O. E. F. PUTNAM. Locke. November 2 6 . 13-15. ________________ 30wtf _____ ; a t h e b e s t s t o y e y e t .— T H E S U B S C R I B E R S h a v i n g e x a m i n e d t h e v a r i o u s p a t t e r n s o f C o o k S t o v e s i n t h e m a r - se t , a r e c o n f i r m e d i n t h e o p i n i o n t h a t A r n o l d ' s P A T E N T IM P R O V E © Y A N K E E p o s s e s s e s a d v a n t a g e s o v e r a n y o t h e r S t o v e i n u s e . F o r c o n v e n i e n c e i n d o i n g a l l k i n d s o f w o r k , t h i s s t o v e i s ro t s u r p a s s e d . T h e c a s t i n g s a r e h e a v y a n d w a r r a n t e d . A U p e r s o n s w a n t i n g a g o o d s t o v e , a r e i n v i t e d t o g i v e n s i f a i r t r i a l , a n d i f f o u n d n o t t o a n s w e r t h e r e c o m m e n a a - i o n s g i v e n i t a f t e r a f a i r t r i a l o f t w o w e e k s , i t m a y h e r e - lu r n e d , a n d t h e m o n e y r e f u n d e d . C a l l a t N o . 7 3 G e n e s e e s t r e e t , o n e d o o r w e s t o f T . M . T u n e , D r u g g i s t , w h e r e m a y b e f o u n d a n e x t e n s i v e a s s o r t - nent of Gook, P a r lo r , and P l a t e Stoves, io m e new and handsome patterns and at very low prices ■tir T i g h t S t o v e s o f v a r i o u s p a t t e r n s . S h e e t I r o n , D u m b in d o t h e r S t o v e s m a d e i n b e a u t i f u l s t y l e . W A T R O U S & H Y D E . G L A S S F A C T O R Y JLi WM. GOODWIN, Manufacturer o f Gilt and Mahogany L O O K I N G G L A S S E S , P o r t r a it aa d P ictu r e F r a m e s , W I N D O W A N D B E D C O R N I C E S . G i l d i n g m a d e t o w a s h , i f o r d e r e d . K e e p s P i c t u r e G l a s s , d o u b l e a n d s i n g l e t h i c k n e s s , o f a l l s i z e s u p t o 2 4 b y 3 5 i n c h e s , p a r t i c u l a r l y f o r s h o w C a s e s v e r y t h i c k G l a s s f o r C u r r i e r s * S l i c k e r s , C o m p a s s G l a s s e s . L o o k i n g G l a s s e s r e p a i r e d t o o r d e r — N o 4 9 E x c h a n g e B l o c k , t w o d o o r s w e s t o f P a r s o n s a n d H e w s o n ' s C a b i n e t W a r e r o o m s . A u b u r n , M a r c h 2 , 1 8 4 2 . -C O A C H , ’ S ig n & O r n a m e n tal P a i n t i n g . - i n a l l i t s b r a n c h e s , d o n e i n a f i r s t r a t e a n d s u b s t a n t i a l m a n n e r , b y T K E N N E D Y , o n N o r t h s t r e e t , n e a r l y o p p o s i t e t h e M e t h o d i s t C h u r c h , c h e a p f o r c a s h o r g o o d p a y . F e b r u a r y l O t b , 1 8 4 6 . M. HORTON A R 0 JQ _ . & Co. 8 5 B e a c h ’ s B l o c k , d e a l e r s i n a l l k i n d s o f H A R D W A R E , l i g h t a n d h e a v y , f r o m a N e e d l e t o a n A n c h o r . B u i l d e r s * a n d C a b i n e t M a k e r s * H a r d w a r e . C a r p e n t e r s * , J o i n e r s ’ a n d C o o p e r s * T o o l s . F a j m e r s 1 U t e n s i l s , I R O N , S T E E L . H o r s e S h o e s , N a i l s , S p i k e s , A n v i l s , V i c e s . L e a d , Z i n c , B l o c k T i n , B r a s s , C o p p e r , S h e e t I r o n , T i n . P u m p s . M i l l , C r o s s c u t , C i r c u l a r a n d T e n o n d S a w s . L e a d P i p e , I r o n , B r a s s a n d C b p p e r W i r e . L e a d C r u c i b l e s , W i r e S c r e e n , C h a i n s . P a i n t s , O i l , G l a s s , S a s h , & c . & c . S . B u c k ’s H o t A i r , S t e w a r t ’s A i r T i g h t , Y a n k e e I m p r o v e d , E a g l e o r D u r k e e S t o v e , a n d m o s t o t h e r p a t t e r n s . T i n , Copper an d Slicet Iro n W a r e , o n h a n d o r m a d e t o o r d e r . A u b u r n , M a r c h 2 0 , 1 8 4 6 . 4 7 w t f ___________ -B L A S T I N G , C a n n o n j_ and Sporting Powder, constantly on hand, fo r s a l e , w h o l e s a l e o r r e t a i l , t w o d o o r s e a s t o f t h e A u b u m H o u - e . b y H . W I L L S O N , Agent A u b u m . J u l y 1 0 , 1 8 4 3 . f o r t h e M a n u f a c t u r e r s . T O W N ’ S S E R I E S o f S C H O O L B O O K S . ~jVT A T J L O N - JL\ A l i Recom* mtndation . I n t h e H a l l s o f C o n g r e s s D e c . 1 3 , 1 8 3 8 . R e s o l v e d , T h a t i n o n s i d e r a t i o n o f t h e u p e r i o r e x c e l l e n c e . f Town's St elling look, w h i c h is so .a p p i l v a r r a n g e d a s o t e a c h t h e m e a n ­ in g a t t h e s a m e t i m e i t d o e s t h e s p e l l i n g o f w o r d s , w e s t r o n g ­ l y r e c o m m e n d i t t o a l l o u r S c h o o l s , a s t h e National Uniform Spelling Book. T h i s S e r i e s o f B o o k s c o m m e n c e s w i t h T H E C H I L D ’S F I R S T R E A D E R — B e i n g a s e r i e s o f E a s y L e s s o n s , p r e p a r e d i n s t r i c t u c c o r d a n c e w i t h t h e v i e w s o f Practical Ttachtrs . T h e r e i s n o m a n l i v i n g o t m o r e e x t e n s i v e a c q u a i n t a n c e w i t h p r a c t i c a l t e a c h e r s , o r _w h o h a s e n j o y e d m o r e f a v o r a b l e o p p o r t u n i t i e s o f a s c e r t a i n i n g t h e i r v i e w s , t h a n t h e a u t h o r o t t h i s b o o k . H i s c o n n e c t i o n w i t h a g r e a t n u m b e r o f T e a c h e r s ’ I n s t i t u t e s , h a s e n a b l e d h m t o c o m b i n e t h e e x p e r i e n c e o f m o r e t h a n two thousand Teachers o f p r i m a r y s c h o o l s t o a i d h i m i n p r e p a r i n g t h e C h i l d ’s F i r s t R e a d e r . C e r t a i n l y n o b o o k c a n c l a i m a b e t t e r a d a p t a t i o n t o p r i m a r y s c h o o l s t h a n t h i s . I t i s i n t r o d u c ­ t o r y to TOWN’S READER, NO. 1 .—This work contains many valuable improvements npon tbe reading books o f the day, C o m m e n c i n g w i t h , t h e m o r e p i m p l e , i t r i s e s g r a d u a l l y t o t h e m o r e d i f f i c u l t s e n t e n c e s . T h e c h i l d c u n e a s i l y o v e r c o m e o v e r y d i f f i c u l t y a s i t a d v a n c e s . I t s r e a d i n g m a t t e r i s s u c h a s i t c a n r e a d i l y u n d e r s t a n d a n d is m a d e o f s u c h e t o i i e s a n d i n c i d e n t s a s c a n n o t f a i l t o s e c u r e a n i n t e r e s t a n d e r e a t e a t a s t e f o r r e n d i n g . T h e w o r d s c o n t a i n e d i n t h e s p e l ­ l i n g l e s s o n s a r e i n c o r p o r a t e d i n t h e s e n t e n c e s f o r r e a d i n g , s o a s t o t e a c h t h e p u p i l t h e e x a c t u s e o f l a n g u a g e . T h e s e t w o w o r k s p r e c e d e T O W N ’S R E A D E R , N O . 2 — W h i c h i s a r r a n g e d o n t h e s a m e p l a n a s t h e F i r s t R e a d e r , b u t i s m a d e u p o f m o r e d i f ­ f i c u l t p i e c e s a n d a d a p t e d t o h i g h e r c l a s s e s . I t i s t o b e u s e d i n c o n n e c t i o n w i t h T O W N ’S S P E L L E R A N D D E F I X E R — A b o o k s o e x ­ t e n s i v e l y u s e d i n a l l p a r t s o f t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s , w i t h t h e e u t i r e a p p r o b a t i o n o f s o m a n y t e a c h e r s , a s t o m a k e d e s c r i p ­ tio n u n n e c e s s a r y . T h i s b o o k i s a l s o e x t e n s i v e l y u s e d m E u r o p e , a n d h a s a m o r e p h i l o s o p h i c a l a r r a n g e m e n t t h a n a n y o t h e r s p e l l e r i n t h e E n g l i s h L a n g u a g e . T h i s i s t h e o p i n i o n e n t e r t a i n e d o f i t b y t h e m o s t e m i n e n t e d u c a t o r s a t h o m e a n d a b r o a d . T O W N ’S R E A D E R , N O . 3 — I s a d a p t e d t o h i g h e r c l a s ­ s e s i n c o m m o n s c h o o l s , a c a d e m i e s a n d s e m i n a r i e s . I t c o n ­ t a i n s a c h o i c e s e l e c t i o n o f p i e c e s f r o m t h e b e s t A m e r i c a n w r i t e r s , a n d i s i n e v e r y r e s p e c t a l l t h a t c a n b e d e s i r e d f o r a yationzl Reading Book. N e x t a n d l a s t i n t h i s s e r i e s , i s t h e p o p u l a r a n d u n i v e r s a l l y a p p r o v e d A N A L Y S I S O F D E R I V A T I V E W O R D S . — T h i s is a c o m p l e t e k e y t o t h e p r e c i s e a n d a n a l y t i c d e f i n i t i o n s o f a l l t h e d e r i v a t i v e w o r d s m t h e E n g l i s h l a n g u a g e , b y P r e f i x e s a n d S u f f i x e s . N o o n e h a s e v e r i n s i n u a t e d a s i n g l e o b j e c ­ t i o n t o t h i s b o o k . I t i s i n g e n e r a l u s e i n a l l p a r t s o f t h e w o r l d w h e r e t h e E n g l i s h l a n g u a g e i s c o r r e c t l y t a u g h t . I t Is s o w e l l k n o w n a s t o m a k e i t e n t i r e l y u n n e c e s s a r y t o a d d a s i n g l e r e c o m m e n d a t i o n f r o m t h e m a n y t h o u s a n d t e s t i ­ m o n i a l s i n f a v o r o f t h i s b o o k F o r s a l e W h o l e s a l e a n d R e t a i l , a t v e r y l o w p r i c e s b y B o o k s e l l e r s . J. C . D E R B Y & C O „ B o o k s e l l e r s a n d P u b l i s h e r s , A u b u r n , N . Y . rnHE PORTS W ILL NOT BE X O P E N E D . — S i r R o b e r t P e e l a n d t h e D u k e o f W e l l i n g t o n l i a v e d e c l a r e d t h a t t h e B r i t i s h P o r t a “ w i l l n o t b e o p e n e d . ” B n t I o n t h e c o n t r a r y d e c l a r e t h a t m y H V E B T S T A B J L j E x v t l l b e O p e n e d t o a l l w h o w i s h t o h i r e g o o d H o r s e s , C a r ­ r i a g e s a n d r i l e i g h s ; a n d w h i l e t h e “ s u b j e c t s ” o f B r i t a i n s l o r d l y m a s t e r s a r e s t a r v i n g f o r f o o d , m y “ s u b j e c t s ” a r e t e d to t h e i r v e r y f u l l n e s s , w h i c h g i v e s t h e m b e a u t y , a c t i v i t y and s w i f t n e s s . Those w i s h i n g , t h e r e f o r e , to h i r e g o o d H O R S E S , C A R R I A G E S A N D S L E I G H S , w i l l f i n d i t to their advantage to g i v e m e a c a l l — moderate p r i c e s a n d p a y d o w n , c o n s t i t u t e s t h e l e a d i n g f e a t u r e o f m y e s t a b l i s h m e n t . I t w i l l b e u n n e c e s s a r y t o “ enquire at the Bar fo r good Livery'* b u t b y c a l l i n g a t m y n e w L i v e r y o f ­ fic e , o n e d o o r east of the C a r House, G a r d e n s t r e e t , I w i l b e f o u n d r e a d y , a t a l l t i m e s , t o s e r v e m y f r i e n d s a n d the p u b l i c g e n e r a l l y . S T E P H E N S . A U S T I N . A u b u r n . P e c . 8 . I S 4 5 . _________ . W ATCHES, JEW E L R Y , J . W . H A I G H T lias’ removed his ---------------- J e w e l r y S t o r e t o IV o « 5 7 C 5 c n e s c c - » t * , (A . j M u n g e r * s o l d , ) a n d h a s r e c e i v e d a l a r g e a s s o r t m e n t o f I G O L D & S I L V E R W A T C H E S , i Silver Spoons and Table Forks, G o l d a n a S i l v e r S p e c t a c l e s a n d P e n c i l s . J e w e l r y , a l a r g e a s s o r t m e n t . G o l d P e n s . E n g l i s h a n d A m e r i c a n B r i t a n i a W a r e . S i l v e r P l a t e d G a n d l e s t i c k s , S n u f f e r s a n d T r o y s . P l a t e d a n d B r i t a n i a C a s t o r s . Solar, Hall, and Camphene Lamps. . _ A l s o , a great variety of other articles in his line, all of the latest patterns, all of weich he will sell as cheap as c a n b e ' purchased i n a n y S t o r e i n the S t a t e . CLEANING AND REPAIRING. T h e S u b s c r i b e r h a v i n g i n h i s e m p l o y t h e m o s t s k i l l f u l w o r k m e n , i s p r e p a r e d t o d o a l l k i n d s o f C l e a n i n s a n d R e ­ p a i r i n g i n t h e b e s t m a n n e r , a t s h o r t n o t i c e , a n d o n t h e m o s t r e a s o n a b l e t e r m s . P l e a s e c a l l a n d e x a m i n e , a t M i m g c r i s O l d S t m u l * 5 7 G e n e s e e - s t . A u b u m , M a r c h 2 , l p 4 6 . J - W \. H A T G I I T . C A R R I A G E M A K IN G . T E W I S & K E N N E D Y , c o n t i n u e J J t o m a n u f a c t u r e a l l k i n d s o f C a r r i a g e s , a s w e l l a s L U M B E R W A G O N S , a t t h e i r o l d s t a n d o n N o r t h s t r e e t , n e a r l y o p p o s i t e t h e M e t h o d i s t C h u r c h , a n d w i l l m a k e t o o r d e r , a n y k i n d o f C a r r i a g e s , a n d s e l l t h e s a m e a s cheap a s a s a n y o t h e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t A l l w o r k w a r r a n t e d w e l l d o n e A l l k i n d s o f R e p a i r i n g d o n e t o o r d e r . A u b u r n , F e b . 1 0 t h , 1 6 4 6 . L . & K . P L O W S ! P l o w s ! A f e w S T A T E P R E M I U M P L O W S , f o r s a l e a t C o s t A l s o , a v a r i e t y o f Stoves, T i n W are, C O P P E R W A R E , S t o v e P i p e , T u h s , P a i l s , P u m p s , & c . & c . . c h e a p f o r C a s h o r a p p r o v e d C r e d i t o n e d o o r w e s t o f P a r s o n & H e w s o n ' s C a b i n e t W a r e R o o m , 9 2 G e n e s e e s t r e e t . A u b u r n . J . C H O A T E & S O N , A p r i l 7 , 1 8 4 6 . ______________________________________d & c t f v M A S O N , at N o . 8 2 G e n e s e e S tree E x c h n n c e B l o c k , A h u m , o f f e r s n s c h c a a s t h e c h e a p e s t i n t h e C o u n t r y o r c i t y , t h e l a r g e s t n n d b e s t a s s o r t m e n t o f c r o c k e r y , c o n s i s t i n g o f C h i­ n a , Glnsw* and E n r t h fii W are, ____________________________ j e v e r o f f e r e d i n W e s t - e r a oN e w x o r k . W e h a v e a g r e a t v a r i e t y o f B r e a k f a s t , D i n n e r a n d T e a a r e , o l o u r o w n i m p o r t a t i o n , m a d e t o o r d e r . A l s o , C h i ­ n a T e a S e t t s o f e v e r y s t y l e i n u s e , ( a n d v e r y s u p e r i o r i n q u a l i t y , ) t o g e t h e r w i t h C U T A N D P L A I N G L A S S W A R E . S o l a r , A s t r a l , H a l l a n d M a n t e l JL a m p s , w i t h C h i m n e y s a n d S h a d e s o f a l l s o r t s a n d 6 i z e s . T a b ic Cutlery, Spoons, and Stone W are, t o g e t h e r w i t h a c h o i c e a s s o r t m e n t o f F A M I L Y G R O C E ­ R I E S , a s g o o d a s t h e b e s t a n d c h e a p a s t b e c h e a p e s t . — C a l l a n d s e e a t M A S O N ’S C R O C K E R Y S T O R E . & U N S M IT H I N G . H . M e L a l l e n offers for sale at his shop, North street. 3 5 D o u b l e G u n s , D o m a s t e r s , S t u b , a n d T w i s t , a n d p l a i n , a g e n e r a l a s s o r t m e n t . D u c k i n g G u n s , & c . 4 0 S i n g l e G u n s . 5 0 p a i r s P o c k e t P i s t o l s , s o m e S e l f - C o c k i n g . 1 0 0 R i f l e s , a l s o o a h a n d , o f h i s o w n m a n u f a c t u r e . M u s k e t s a n d E q - t i p p a g e f o r M i l i t a r y T r a i n i n g s . G a m e B a g s , P o w d e r F l a s k s , R i f l e B a r r e l s a t $ ‘2 a p i e c e , a n d a l l a r t i c l e s s u i t a b l e f o r G u n m a k i n g . S h o t b y t b e B a g , a n d P o w d e r b y t h e K e g o r s m a l l e r q u a n ­ tity . A ll b u s i n e s s i n h i s l i n e , r e p a i r i n g , & c . , d o n e o n t h e s h o r t ­ e s t n o t i c e — a n d a l l t h e a b o v e s o l d , a s w e l l a s w o r k d o n e a t r e d u c e d p r i c e s t o s u i t t b e ti m e s . O l d G u n s t a k e n in e x c h a n g e f o r n e w o n e s , a s w e l l a s a l l k i n d s o f C o u n t r y P r o d u c e . M a y . 1 8 4 2 ._________________________________H . M c L A L L E N . W A T C H E S A N D J E W E L R Y . J OHN J. R IC E HAS JU S T R E C E IV E D a large supply of G o ld Sc Silver W atches, Clocks, Jew e lry, S i l v e r W a r e , C u t l e r y , G o l d P e n a , G o l d a n d S i l v e r P e n c i l s S p e c t a c l e s a n d F a n c y G o o d s t o o n u m e r o u s t o m e n t i o n ; a l o t w h i c h h e i s d e t e r m i n e d t o s e l l o n v e r y r e a s o n a b l e t e r m s . N . B . W a t c h e s a n d C l o c k s o f e v e r y d e s c r i p t i o n r e p a i r e d i n a m a n n e r t o g i v e g e n e r a l s a t i s f a c t i o n . J O B W O R K o f a l l d e s c r i p t i o n s i n o u r l i n e , d o n e w i t h n e a t n e s s a n d d e s ­ p a t c h . No* 5 1 Genesee street* ~\TQOD W A N T E D a t t h i s o f f i c e ’ IV ( r iu payment fu r papers. R O U N D R IC E , f o r s a l e b y April 20 A. H. & J. BURT. ~VT F a n c y C a s s i m e r e s , V &c., new styles, very rich Satin Vestings. Woolen Velvet, do, entirely new patterns, and colored G R I S W O L D & C O . f a n c y C a s s i m e r e s , j u s t r e c ’d b y TnLAX ! FLAX ! — A l l w h o X that uniesirable article, can exchange it for desirable Goods, at H. WOODRUFF'S, A p r i l 2 9 . 1 8 4 6 . No. 77 Genesee-st. jriagPfo FA R M FO R S A L E .— T H E K g S j e S * ' S u b s c r i b e r o f f e r s f o r s a l e f r o m E i s h t y to one hundred acres _ | o f h i s t a r m , o n w h i c h i s a s p a c i o u s H o u s e , t w o B a r n s . C a r r i a g e H o u s e , W o o d H o u s e , a n d G r a i n e r y , & c . A n A p p l e O r c h a r d o f a b o u t 1 0 9 t r e e s o f c h o i c e f r u i t , a n d a v a r i e t y o f P e a c h e s , P e a r s , a n d C h e r r i e s , a n d a b o u t f i f t e e n A c r e s o f W o o d L a n d . L a i d f a m i s s i t ­ u a t e d t w o m i l e s s o u t h f r o m t h e C o u r t H o u s e , i n A u b u r n . F o r f u r t h e r p a r t i c u l a r s e n q u i r e o f t h e s u b s c r i b e r o n t h e p r e m i s e s . D A V I D M A D D E N . A u g u s t , 2 0 t h , 3 8 4 6 . J 1 6 t f A l s o , b y t h e s a m e , 8 0 a c r e s o f T i m b e r L a n d , n e a r t h e h e a d o f O w a s c o L a k e , i n t h e t o w n o f V e n i c e . A l s o , 5 0 a c r e s o f L a n d o n l o t N o . 1 3 , i n t h e t o w n o f C o n q u e s t . E n ­ q u i r e a s a b o v e . T) E M O V A L .— M. H . K E N N E D Y , X \ ) h a s r e m o v e d h i s P a i n t i n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t t o t h e c o r n e r o f N o r t h a n d C h a p e l - s t r e e t s , w h e r e h e w i l l b e r e a d y t o m e e t h i s o l d c u s t o m e r s a n d a s m a n y o f h i s n e w o n e s a s m a y c h o o s e t o f a v o r h i m w i t h a c a l l . Coach, S ign Sc O r n a m e n tal P a in t i n g , e x e c u t e d i n a w o r k m a n l i k e m a n n e r , a s c h e a p o s t h e c h e a p * e s t , a n d p r o m p t l y a t t e n d e d t o . G e n e r a l s a t i s f a c t i o n g u a r ­ a n t i e d . D o n ’t f o r g e t t h e p l a c e — a t t h e o l d s t a n d o f J . G . D o w n e r . KENNEDY & DANFORTH, s u c c e s s o r s t o D a n f o r t h fc B a r r o n , w i l l _ c o n t i n u e t h e C A R R I A G E B U S I N E S S , c o m e r o f N o r t h a n d C h a p e l - s t r e e t s , i n a l l i t s b r a n c h e s , a n d w i l l m a k e t o o r d e r , a n y t h i n \ i n t h e s h a p e o f a c a r r i a g e a s c h e a p a s c a n b e m a d e a n y w h e r e . R e p a i r i n g d o n e i n t h e b e s t m a n n e r , a n d n o n e b n t t h e b e s t m a t e r i a l s u s e d . Aubum, May 6,1646 ,N O T T O B E B E A T ! !— J . Sc C . C l i A P P , a t t h e o l d s t a n d , c o r n e r o f S t a t e a n d C l a r s t r e e t s , h a v e o n h a n d a l a r g e a s s o r t m e n t o f t h e m o s t fa s h * io n a b l e C A R R I A G E S , m a d e o f t h e b e s t m a t e r i a l s , a n d c o n - s t i n u e t o m a k e P c d l a r d ’ W a g o n s i n t h e m o s t a p p r o v v e d s t y l e . T h o s e w i s h i n g t o p u r c h a s e w i l l d o w e l l t o c a l l b e f o r e p u r c h a s i n g , a s t h e y a r e d e t e r m i n e d n o t t o b e u n d e r ­ s o l d . A u b u r n , M a y , 1 6 4 6 . c t f L Y M A N ’S H i s t o r i c a l C h a r t , c o n - t a i u i n g t h e p r o m i n e n t events o f the c i v i l r e - li g i o u s a n d l i t e r a r y H i s t o r y o f t h e W o r l d , w i t h a k e y f o r t h e u « e o f s t u d e n t s . T o b e o b t a i n e d a t W Y N K O O P S * . flREAT v x B A R . GAINS, to those w h o b u y Piano Fortes , A f u - sic and Musical Instruments. D o n o t f a i l t o c a l l a n d e x ­ a m i n e J . P E R C I Y A I . ’S i m p r o v e d Superior F in e Toned P i a n o Fortes, a n d j u d g e f o r y o u r s e l v e s , a l l y o u w h o w o u l d s e e t h e i m ­ p r o v e m e n t s i n t h e q u a l i t y a n d s t y l e o f M u s i c a l M e r c h a n ­ d i z e . A l l a r t i c l e s s o l d h e r e w a r r a n t e d e q u a l t o w h a t t h e y a r e r e c o m m e n d e d . 8ERAPHLNS AND MELODIONS, i n t h e e s t i m a t i o n o f t h e m o s t c o m p e t e n t j u d g e s t h e b e s t m T j n e a n d fiu i - h o f a n y m a d e , a r e o f f e r e d a t t h e m a n u ­ f a c t u r e r s ’ p r i c e s . A c c o r d i o n s , P l u t c s , G u i t a r s , V i o l i n s , a n d Bass V i o U , w i t h t h e I n s t r u c t i o n s f r o m t h e b e s t M a s ­ t e r s o f t h e a g e , a t t h e m o s t r e a s o n a b l e p r i c e s , w i t h a g e n ­ e r a l a s s o r t m e n t o f a r t i c l e s i n t h e lin e . J u s t r e c e i v e d a n d o a h a n d 1 5 , 0 0 0 p a g e s C h o i c e M u s i c j t h e l a r g e s t a n d c h e a p e s t l o t e v e r o f f e r e d i n A u ­ b u r n , a t t h e r e d u c e d a n d l o w p r i c e o f 4 c e n t s r p a g e . A rare chance t o c o l l e c t a v o l u m e f r o m a h o s t o f s u c h i n i m i ­ ta b l e a u d i m p e r i s h a b l e c o m p o s i t i o n s a s t h o s e o f M o z a r t ^ B e e t h o v e n , R o s s i n i , V o n W e b e r a n d M o o r e . A11 t h e N E W P O P U L A R M U S I C , w i l l b e o r d e r e d a s s o o n a s p u b l i s h e d , a n d s o l d a t t h e l o w ­ e s t N e w Y o r k p a i c e s . o r d e r s w i l l h a v e i m m e d i a t e a t t e n t i o n — N o . 7 S G e n e s e e - s t r e s t , A u b u r n , o v e r B a r t l s t f a S t o r e . May, 1846. j. PERCVAL. B E w a J S I W ' [VOL. 14 —NUMBER- 20 . AUBURN JOURNAL. - — — ' ■ ■ i W e d n e sday, Septem b er 16, 1846. m o JU R O R S IN T H E W Y A T T X and Freeman Cases. ,T. S. BA R T L E T T will t a k e J u r o r s o r d e r s o n t h e C o u n t y T r e a s u r e r a s C A S H f o r g o o d s , t h u s s a v i n g t o t h e h o l d e r n e a r l y a y e a r ’s i n t e r e s t . A u b u r n , J u l y 1 5 , 1 8 4 6 . 20 Y E A R S ’ E X P E R I E N C E . A T T E N D TO y o u r t e e t h i n s e a s o n , and prevent your hav­ i n g t h e f o l l o w i n g a n d m a n y o t h e r d i s e a s e s , I w h i c h d e c a y e d o r d i s e a s e d t e e t h a r e o f t e n t h e c a u s e o f : P h t h e s i s , P u l m o n a l i s o r C o n s u m p t i o n . D y s p e p s i a , P a i n i n t h e E a r a n d l o n n a t i o n o f m a t t e r i n t h a t o r g a n , I n f l a m m a t i o n o f t h e E y e s . Norvous affections. Epilepsy, Hysteria, &c. Hypocondrasis, Rheumatic affections, lie douloureaux, Neuralgia, Sympathetic Headache. Scurvey, Tumors from the Gums. D i s e a s e s o f t h e A n t i u m a n d M a x i l l i e , G u m b o i l s , A b - s e s s e s . tcc. D r . R u s h s a y s . W h e n w e c o n s i d e r h o w o f t e n t h e t e e t h w h e n d e c a y e d , a r e e x p o s e d t > i r r i t a t i o n f r o m h o t a n d c o l d d r i n k s a n d a l i m e n t s , i r o m p r e s s u r e , b y m o r t i f i c a t i o n , a n f r o m t h e c o l d a i r , a n d h o w i n t r i c a t e t h e c o n n e c t i o n o f t h m o u t h i s w i t h t h e w h o l e s y s t e m , I a m d i s p o s e d t o b e l i e v e t h e y a r e o f t e n t h e u n s u s p e c t e d c a u s e s o f G e n e r a l a n d p a r t i c u l a r l y o f N e r v o u s D i s e a s e s . W h e n e v e r a d e f e c t i s d i s c o v e r e d i n a t o o t h , h a v e i t e x ­ a m i n e d a t o n c e h y a n e x p e r i e n c e d a n d s k i l l f u l D e n t i s t , a n d t h e r e m e d y a p p l i e d , w h i c h , i f n o t t o o f a r a d v a n c e d , w i l l s a v e t h e t o o t h l o r m a n y y e a r s , i f n o t f o r l i f e . T o s u c h a s h a v e l o s t t h e i r t e e t h , I w o u l d s a y , t h a t i h a v e s e v e r a l t h o u s a n d o f t h e m o s t b e a u t i f u l T e e t h o n h a n d , a n d a m c o n - stantly manufacturing. Those wishing teeth inserted can be furnished with those adapted to the nicest taste. Hav. ing been engaged for the last 20 years in Dentistry, my ex­ perience enables me to perform every operation with the b e s t s u c c e s s . S . B A L L . O f f i c e o n W i l l i a m S t . , 2 d d o o r f r o m G e n e s e e , n e a r l y o p ­ p o s i t e t h e A m e r i c a n H o t e l . Auburn, May 19,1846. ___________________ 2d4ctf HYDE, 7 3 G e n - c s c e s t r e e t ^ A n b a r n ^ h a v e r e c e n t l y m a d e , a n d a r e n o w m a k i n g l a r g e a d d i t i o n s t o t l i e i r s t o c k o f g o o d s , a n d n o w o f t e r f o r s a l e a m o r e c o m p l e t e a s s o r t m e n t t h a n e v e r a t t h e L o w e s t © r f c c s j p a r t i c u l a r l y H o u s e k e e p i n g a r t i c l e s i n g r e a t v a r i e t y . B u i l d e r s ’ H a r d w a r e , c o n s i s t i n g of many new and deairt* b l e a r t i c l e s . F a r m e r s ’ U t e n s i l s g e n e r a l l y . C a r p e n t e r s ’ a n d J o i n e r s ’ Tools. C a b i n e t M a k e r s ’ H a r d w a r e . M a c h i n i s t s ’ a n d B l a c k s m i t h s * T o o l s . C a r r i a g e M a k e r s * H a r d w a r e . Iro n , Steel, N a ils, G lass, Sash. C o m m o n a n d d i t c h i n g S h o v e l s a n d S p a d e s M i l l , C r o s s c u t , a n d C i r c u l a r S a w s . Brass and Iron Wire. Sheet Brass—German Silver. COOK AND PARLOR STOVES in very great variety, at W holesale and R e t a i l . C O P P E R , T I N , A N D S H E E T I R O N manufactured generally and to order. Aubunr March 2,1845. J u d i c i a l R n p a c i i y . — M o n s l r o u s t M o n ­ strous ! I M o n s tio u s ! I I Gov. W e i g h t awarded the Attorney General 3 5 0 a day for attending the trials o f W t a t t and F r e e m a n ; but d eem s the State to poor to pros­ ecute its system o f internal improvements. If a ll the functionaries o f government were as liber­ ally feed, tbe poverty oi the State wonld b e very evideut.— [Roch. Dem. The following report b y the Comptroller, in answer to a resolutiou by the Convention, shows the amounts paid to Circuit Judges for furnishing to the Governor copies of testimony in trials for murder, within the last thsee years: 1343. March 7, to John W illard, $25 87 “ 21, Nathan Dayton, 56 25 Dec. 23, Charles H. Ruggles, 77 83 1344. Feb. 12, Nathan Dayton, 60 00 June 10, A m a saJ. Parker, 70 12 Dec. 10, do 67 50 1345. July 26, do 160 37 Oct. 15, do 44 62 “ 23, do UO 62 1346. Jan. 2, John Willard, 54 00 “ 9, John W. Edmonds, 58 50 June 1, Amasa J . Parker, 39 33 “ 18, Johu Willard. 103 75 Aug. 1, BOW E N W HITING, 311 25 “ 12, do 7 1 3 62 $1,962 23 During the progress o f the W yatt and Freeman trials w e took occasion to express our r egret that it should have been deem ed necessary, to add to the necessary expences oi the Special! Term, by associating w ith the District Attorney, the Attor­ ney General o f the State. W e stated that h e had been allow ed by Gov. W right for his-services on the Columbiaaud Delaware Anti-Rent trials over two thousand dollars, being at the rate o f about $75 per day. and remarked that it could not be presumed that he would receive a much less sum for liis services at the Cayuga Murder trials. W e stated too onr opinion, (an opinion which w e have had no reason to change,) that the District Attor­ ney might have called to his aid from the Bar of Cayuga County equal talents and ability a t a com­ paratively nominal compensation. H o w stands the case / The W yatt and Freeman trials occu­ pied about seven w e eks. The Attorney General was engaged in their prosecution six weeks. At $50 per day his compensation would be $2100! According to a statement o f the County Clerk which w e published afier the adjournment o f the Court, the expenses chargeable on the county Treasury amounted to about $4,000. Much of this expense was unnecessary and uncalled for. A dozen or so of Sheriff’s deputies and constables were constantly em p loyed at a per diem allow­ ance, when less than half the number would have answered every purpose. Four County Judges received a per diem allowance for the whole term, wheu the Gjveruor’s Commission appoiutmg the Term, required only tw o to be associated w ith the Circuit Judge,— aud received a per diem al­ lowance for what?— for appearing daily upon the Bench just long enough to get their two dollars ! and theu descending therefrom, nnd sullying its dignity— soiling the ermine— disgracing their of­ fice and themselves by mixing with the populace and becoming the manufacturers o f public opinion against the prisoners—by casting ridicule and odi­ um upon the nature, mode and conduct of their defence, by impugning the motives and denoun­ cing the course o f their couuset, and opening their eyes iu holy horror at the enormous expense to which they w e re subjecting the County of Cay­ uga ! But, so far as expenses are concerned, the H o n . the Attorney General.aud their Honors the County Judges are thrown com p letely into the shade, by liis Honor the Circuit Judge. ONE THOUSAND AND T W E N T Y -F O U R DOLLARS AND EIG II- TY-SEVEN C E N T S !! ( $ 1 0 2 4 8 7 J J) jor fur nishing the Governor with “ a Statement o f con­ viction and sentence, with the notes o f testimony taken ” by him in the cases n f Wyatt aud Freeman, — more than the whole sum charged by and al­ low e d to all the other Circuit Judges in the State for similar services for the last three years. But let us see what is the statute on this sub­ ject. The 13th section o f title 1st ciiap. 1st part 4th of Revised Statutes is as follow s: “ The presiding judge of tile court at which such conviction shall have taken place, shall im­ mediately thereupon, transmit to the governor o f this state by mail, a statement o f snch conviction and sentence, with the notes o f testimony taken by such Judge on the trial. The expense o f such statement, to be estimated at the rate a llow ed for drafts aud copies o f pleadings iu the supreme court, to be audited by the comptroller, aud paid out of the treasury.” It w ill be seeu Irom the above section, that the statute clearly contemplates that the original notes of testimony taken by the Judge on the trial should be forwarded to the Governor, for which it provides no compensation; the only com­ pensation being for the “ statement o f conviction and sentence/’ which must necessarily be brief. Instead o f complying with the statute, tbe Judge has caused a copy of the testimony in each case to be made, and for which and the draft he has charged the fees allow ed only for making the “ statement o f conviction and sentence,” viz. twen­ ty-five cents per folio (or every 100 words) for draft, and tw e lve and a h alf cents per folio for CO­ PY- W e are astounded at such an exhibition o f ju­ dicial rapacity on tbe part of Judge W hiting.— W e cannot conceive how he could reconcile with his conscience or judgm ent, or a decent regard for public opiuion, such an enormous exaction, eveu if there w ere law to sanction it: butouraston- ishment and indiguation are immeasurably in­ creased w h en w e reflect that he has demanded and received this immense compensation iu di­ rect violation o f the law o f the State. Nor can w e see how the Comptroller could have recon­ ciled it with his sense of duty to allow this mon­ strous claim and to issue his warrant upon the State Treasurer for its payment. What Legisla­ ture, or what Committee of a Legislature, w ill sanction the conduct o f the Comptroller by au­ diting and allowing bis voucher therefor 7 In order to show theenormity o f this transaction w e here state that w e would have bound our­ selves to publish the testimony on both trials, from the Judges minutes, together w ith the “ statements o f conviction and sentence,” in a volume elegantly bound iu gilt, and delivered the s a m e to the Governor, for less than t w o h u x d h e d d o l l a r s ! _______________ _____ W HAT IS TH E DIFFERENCE ? H i r a m R a t h b u n was removed (or resigned to prevent b eing removed) from the office o f Keep­ er of the State Prison, because he had been in­ dicted by a Grand Jury. The Inspectors of tbe Prison took the ground that it was highly impro­ per to retain an ofRcer iu that institution resting under anindictmeut. Accordingly Rathbun was removed. A t the last Court o f General Sessions, another high officer o f State Prison was indicted, to wit, R u s s e l l C h a f f e l l , Agent. H e has been indicted for furnishiug unwholesome food to the convicts, which by law is declared to be a misde­ meanor punishable by fine and imprisonment.— When it was kuown that C h a p p e l l was indicted, it was the general expectation that the Inspectors would carry out the doctrine acted upon in the case of R a t h b u n . We should like to k n o w w h y this distinction. By what rule of propriety or duty should R a t h b u n - be removed and C h a f f e l l retained ? The Inspectors when they removed R a t h b u n w ere terribly shocked at the idea o f re­ taining an indicted officer in the Prison. But what has cooled their sensitiveness and warped their sense of duty 1 Let us have an explana­ tion. Give ns the difference betw e en the two cases. C h a p p e l l stauds indicted ior a grave of­ fence, aud beyond all question should be removed without delay. W ill the conscientious Inspec­ tors attend to this matter 7 f T he S ub -T reasury .— T he collector at Balti­ more, says the Rochester Democrat, recently sent over $40,000 in coin to the Treasury at’ Washing­ ton—the first installment under the new law.— Five or six clerks and messengers w ere em p loyed all day and into the next counting it. W e shall need a jolly lot of officers when the a c t g ets fully into operation—if it ever does. The Albany Argus says that Ex-President Van- Buren arrived in that city on Monday, and is with his son, Smith T . Van Buren. Mr. V. B. w ill qome w e st, in order to be in attendance at the State Agricultural Fair at Auburn, before return­ ing to his residence in Columbia County TH E WORLD'S TEM P E R A N C E CONVEN­ TION. This body commenced its sessions in London on Tuesday, Aug. 4tb, and closed on Saturday, Aug. Sth. About 200 delegates from various to­ tal abstinence societies in Great,Britain and else­ where attended. Ou the propositiou o f Dr. B e e ­ cher of America, Mr. S . B o w ly of Gloucester was called to the Chair. Dr. Becher, Dr. Cox, Rev. W. Reid, Lawrence H eyworth, James Haughton, and Dr. Mussey w ere appointed V ice Presidents, and Thomas Beggs, Henry Clapp, Jam es Haughton, and E d ­ ward Chrimes, Secretaries. Rev. J. Marsh o f New York, Rev. Dr Beecher of Cincinnati, Henry Clapp of Lynn, Rev. E . N. Kirk o f Boston, Prof. Caldwell o f Lexington Ky., Dr. Cox o f Brooklyn, Frederick Douglass, the American Slave &c. &c., took part iu the discus­ sions. The question o f American Slavery was intro­ duced iu some way, but how, can not be w e ll as­ certained from tbe meagre reports—Garrison of Boston made some remarks on the subject. T h e N . Y. Commercial s a y s: From expressions in several of the journals w e are led to infer that the gathering w a s not very successful. Some difficulty appears to have been caused by the lan­ guage of some of the speakers, who very need­ lessly dragged in the anti-slavery question; and various propositions more legitimately pertaining to the business o f the convention were discussed with so much acrimony that the chairman was obliged to interpose. A plan was suggested for the formation of a “ world’s temperance nnion,” but it seem s to' have fullen through, it beiug doubted whether funds could be provided. Apropos of temperance societies, the Paris correspondent o f the Courrier d es EtatsU u is tells the following capital story. “ W e learn that a London temperance society, a few days ago, deputed tw o of Us members to Prince Albert to solicit his august patronage.— When the deputies presented them selves at Buck­ ingham palace, the Prince had just returned from a long ride on horseback and with a dozen guests was about to sit down to a collation. Informed that tw o gentleman desired to have an audience with him, the husband o f the Queen ordered that they should be introduced on the spot. The gen­ tleman usher announced their names, which were honorably known, and without giving them time to explain the object of their visit, the Prince of­ fered them a glass of Xeres wine. As they were preparing to refuse, a chamberlain, w h o was pres­ ent whispered to them, that it would be a great breach of propriety— tliat the Priuce having con­ descended to fiil the glasses with his own Hand, a refusal would be a monstrous insult—a rude­ ness without example. Yet the deputies, who liad an e x cellent excuse, wished to avail them selves of it; but at the very first words, which one o f them was endeavoring to turn with elegance, Prince Albert interrupted him, saying, “ Gentlemen, I drink the health of our well-beloved Q u een!” “ Every good Englishman would rather die than not respond to this toast,” cried an aid-de- camp, raising his glass with a noble enthusiasm.” There could be no longer any hesitation—it was oue o f those unanticipated and tyraunical occa­ sions—one o f those imperious fatalities before which rigorous principles must bow . The two deputies resigned them selves to violate the tem ­ perance rules in order not to offend a prince whose benevolent aid they had come to solicit. The success of their mission perhaps depended upon this infraction. When the glass nf Xeres became empty, the aid-de-camp, who had becom e spokes­ man, armed him self with a glass of Champaigne and drank the health of the Q'leen’s glorious spouse! Again, the deputies could uot hesitate. Having drank ouce, they had no excilse for not drinking again. Besides, the rules of their socie­ ty were no more violated by two glasses of wine than by one. They drank the Champaigne.— From that moment all their scruples w ere drown­ ed; they continued resolutely to undergo the p roof and they soon became so very animated that one o f them took the initiative iu framing a toast to the august childreu o f the Queen aud Prince— the other a d d ed: “ May their progeny one day be ten tim es more numerous than at present!” “ By G— Sir, y o u speak with great freedom,” cried Prince Albert, who considered such a wish not a little extravagant. When the toasts had becom e exhansted, the deputies, who had been out of the habit o f drink­ ing, w e re no longer in a condition to c o llect their ideas or to explain the object o f their visit. They entered their carriage and left. The Society was assembled in its hall o f deliberation awaiting their return. They appeared— they entered the ball with au unsteady step—their e y es sparkled, their visages had the rich tints o f purple— their speech was embarrassed— they stammered unmeaning words— then, they fell heavily, partly on a bench and partly on the floor. You can easily imagine the stupor o f the assembly at this spectacle and tbe gaiety of Prince Albert on learning that he had fuddled the temperance society in the person of its embassadors. ** PR E S ID E N T IA L FIGURING. Mr. Folk, says the Albany Evening Journal, desires and expects a re-electicn. Mr. Buchanan came North (making Saratoga the pretext) to conciliate Gov. Wright, to whose organ, the At­ las, a preparatory crumb was thrown. But Mr. Buchauan, instead o f working for his Master, is intent ouly upon his own objects. Mr. Van Bu­ ren, Mr. Blair, &c-, happened also to be in the city, and the arrangements look to the elevation of Guv. W right rather thau the re-election of President Polk. The truth o f the matter is, that Polk’s Cabinet are playing the Tyler game over. They lack ei­ ther the honesty or the courage to tell him that he is to be dropped. Mr. Buchanan, as his own prospects darken, turns to Gov. Wright, who, should he, with the aid of General Government patronage, be re-elected Governor, w ill then be brought forward against Mr. Polk, as a candi­ date for President. Mr. Buchanan was offered a nomination for Judge of the Supreme Court. In canvassing the Senate, he ascertained that his confirmation was impossible, aud deciiued it. N o w he wants the Mission to England, but tbe P resident decided in favor of Mr. Bancroft, whose appointment w ill soon be announced. Mr. Buchanan, comes North, ostensibly to serve, but really to sacrifice his Chief. TH E TRUTH PLAINLY SPOKEN. In other columns w ill be found a most pow­ erful article from Cassins M. Clay’s True Ameri­ can. It ech ies our sentiments exactly, and tbe day is not far distaut, wheu the truths here utter­ ed w ill m e et with a most hearty response from the eutire North. It is eloquent and soul-stirring, and worthy o f a careful perusal. If such a spirit animated the people of the North, w e should no no longer be cursed with “ D.mgh-faces.” We hope our Representative, Hon. Geo. R a t h b u n w ill g ive this article particularattention. No man has more strongly denounced Southern arrogance and dictation than he, but this was a lways before an important v o te w a s taken. H e made a valiant speech against the annexation of Texas and when the hour of trial came voted in favor o f it. H e made a strong speech against M’K a v ’s British Tariff bill, and turned round and voted for it. It is such Representatives tbat have enabled the South to accomplish her peculiar designs, and sujected Northern m e m b e rs o f C ongress to the appellation o f ” Dough Faces.” * The Ithaca Daily Chronicle says that i t may be that the Ithaca and Auburn line o f telegraph will b e put in operation about these d a y s ; an event w h i c h s e e m s to h a v e b e e n l o n g e n o u g h d e l a y e d . The want of sufficient instruments appears to have been the cause o f d elay— the w ires and the lightning have been all ready for some time. W e understand the Ithaca and Elmira line w ill be constructed. _______________ W e are requested to state that R ockwell & S tone ’ s Circus Company w ill enter Auburn ou Tuesday morning, and after making a procession, w ill proceed to their Grand Pavillion, adjoining the gronnds of the Fair, w h ere they w ill give three performances each day o f the Fair, v i z ; morning, afternoon and evening. The tim e for the commencement of performances given on M onday. “ T h e M ormng N e w s . ” — T h e N e w York “ Morning new s,” a Polk, Texas. Free Trade and Silas W right paper, has been discontinued, It was established by Mr. O ’S u l l i v a n , w h o bas been patronised and petted by the city, state and general Governments. With such backers it would have scarcely failed i f it had secured a rea­ sonable share o f the people’s favor. The Daily Globe, now the orgau o f Admiral Hoffman, says that the surcease of the N e w s “ w ill strengthen _tho party.” The Globe adds that the News, from the d ay of its birth, has been a “ constant tax upon the wealthy men ofthe party.”— A lb. Jour. , SUICIDE. We learn from the Syracuse Daily Star o f Mon­ day, that a man by the name o f John Harrington, an Englishman, 30 or 35 years of age, committed suicide by hanging him self to the lim b o f a tree near .the Poor House, o f which he was an inmate on Thursday night last. The Star intimates that certdti circumstances—hisappearance—his dejec­ ted dnd downcast look—his singular manner— his esfelent dread of life and fear o f death, warrant the « i e f that some human being man have fallen by hjshands; Theffthaca Daily Chronicle, a cknowledges that welmije got ourselves handsomely out of that bu- smess of “ Frost aud Tomatoes on tbe 4th of J u- ly,” but says in allusion to our account of the mammoth Tomatoes presented us by Mr. Good­ win, thit the story which w e told about a market basket.“ filled with two Tomatoes looks like rath­ er a Good ’un !” W e shall reserve onr reply to the a b t’-e itniinuatton u util w e see what the Chron-. has to s..y about that box that came to n s , filed w ith O X R ' T o m a to ! Mr. Bradbury’s election to the U. S. Senate from the Slate ot Maine, is stilt a question o f dis­ pute. A long communication in the Bangor W hig ot Sept. 1st, in relation to the election o f Air. Bradbury to the U. S. Senate, signed by several respectable names, amongst others, by Wm. P. Fessenden, formerly of Congress. They declare their readiness to prove that either fraud or great carelessness was used to elect him. The Syracuse Daily Standard of Tuesday an­ nounces that it “ is the eighty-second number, and the last that will be issued for the present at least.” The weekly paper will be published as usual, STATE FAIR ADDRESS. W e understand that Samuel Stevens Esq., of Albany, is expected to deliver the Annual State Fair Address. We understand that arrangements are be­ ing made to give a magnificent Ball at “ Floral Hall,” at the conclusion o f the State Fair, Thurs­ day evening, Sept. 16th. See Notice NEW PUBLICATIONS. No. 3, of F o r s t e r ’s “ S t a t e s m e n o f t h e Com­ m o n w e a l t h o f E n g l a n d , ” em bellished w ith a portrait o f John Hamden and containing a sketch of S ir Henry Vane. Also, No. 107— 103 of Harpers’ I l l u m i n a t e d a n d I l l u s t r a t e d S h a k s p e a r e , containing notes on King Henry IV, aud the commencement of King Henry Y, have b een received at W yn ko op ’s. T w o L i v e s , o r T o S e e m a n d t o b e ; b y Maria J. Mc­ Intosh. a u ' h o r o f “ C o n q u e s t a n d S e l f C o n q u e s t , ’’ “ P r a i s e a n d P r i n c i p l e . ” *’ W o m a n a n E n i g m a , ” A c . & c Amusement and instruction are here blended in another ofth e author’s delightful titles. L a n e t o n P a r s o n a g e : A T a l e , b y t h e a u t h o r o f “ A m y H e r b e r t , ” ’* G e r t r u d e , ” &c. E d i t e d b y R e v . W . S e ­ w e l l , D . D . , of E x e t e r C o l l e g e , O x f o r d . The Courier and Enquirer,in a notice of “ Ger trade,” says that the author of that narrative lias unfolded a profound acquaintance with the hu­ man heart and lias successfully adapted Ler knowledge to the illustration of the various prin­ ciples of female conduct as developed in ordinary life— that few books of this class are more wor­ thy of attentive perusal by young wom en, for whom it is a complete mirror. These remarks apply equally to “ Laneton Parsonage.” Both the above works are from the press of Appleton & Co., N. York, and may be obtained at W y s k o o p ’ s . W ill B bocioian , br the Stoagglers. A tale by a coun­ try Curate. To which is added the Murder In the Wil- demess. T h e above is the title of a pair o f small sketch­ es recently published by A. B. F. Ormbsy, o f Sy­ racuse ; and which liave been spoken of to us as possessing thrilling interest. They are ornament­ ed with numerous embellishments, somewhat par­ taking of the fanciful; and are to bo obtained of booksellers generally, for 12£ cents. A considerable crowd was collecled yesterday, in front o f the Syracuse House, Ly the arrival of a large wagon, drawn by six horses, aud in which w ere six or eight persons in full and perfect In- diau costume, accompanied by some one who played the key bugle with admirable sweetuess. The wagon was labeled by large letters painted on the sides and ends, “ California,” ‘‘Oregon,” “ Texas,” and “ M exico.” W hether the inmates ofthe wagon were (br nsarlinty Indians, w e could not say— we know they looked very much like the genuinP, and i f they w ere uot, the counter­ feit was well executed. The head of each horse bore a red plume, aud the w h o le concern was w e ll got up, made a fine display, and and col­ lected all the loafers and boys who are hangiug about our streets.— [Syr. Star. The above concern made its appearance in front o f the W estern Exchange on Tuesday, and w ith like effect. They w ere a part of the per­ formances at the Theatre that eveuing and last evening. They are genuine, and no counterfeit. They are, “ for a sarlinty Indians.” They are “ Native Americans” and belong to the only “ Na­ tive American party” that ought to be tolerated in this Republic. COURTS OF CONCILIATION. It w ill be recollected that a proposition oonfer- itig power on the Legislature to organize Courts of Conciliation , passed the Convention by a con siderable majority, but was, after a successful mo­ tion for reconsideration, finally defeated. The Albauy Evening Journal publishes a long commu­ nication addressed by a member of the Conven­ tion, to its President, deploring the failure o f the proposition, aud calling upon the President to use his influence in behalf o f such a p ower in the Le­ gislature, aud subjoins the following just com m e n ts:— Deeply and keenly do w e regret the fate o f the proposition authorizing the Legislature to establish Courts o f Conciliation. In no other way could the Convention have done so much for the People and the State._ Such tribunals would have proved public blessings,for which the Con­ vention would have beeu honored and revered in all common time. A t least one-quarter— proba­ bly a lull third, of the causes of litigation, aud that o f the..most unprofitable and unpleasant de- scriplionavonld have been c o n c i l i a t e d . U was urged that these courts, however w e ll they may work elsew h ere, could not be adapted to our people and condition. This— w e speak in all deference— is an erroneous impression. W e have seen lhe wnrkngis o f a Court o f Conciliation among a people like ourselves, though under a different form of Government. Its influence was eminently beneficial. Suits organizing in passion, excitem ent or misapprehension, w ere generally Conciliated. Not unfrequently complicated col­ lision of interest are compromised. Aud what is true of the subjects of the King o f Denmark, w o u ldbe true of American citizens i f our C o n sti-. tution and Laws would but recognize this truly enlightened and philanthropic feature in civil j uris- prudence. Courts of Conciliation, in averting Litigation would necessarily, w e admit, render the Legal Profession less seductive to ottr Yotmg Men.— B u t w e cauDot regard this circumstance as inju­ rious either to the community, or to the Profes­ sion. Too many young men are withdrawn from other, aud n o t less useful or respectable pursuits, by the attractions of the Barand the Bench. W e are surprised that one v iew o f this qnestion should not have found favor with snch Members o f the Convention as doubted the efficiency o f Courts o f Conciliation. T h e section o n ly confer­ red npon the Legislature tbe pow e r to create snch Tribunals. I f tried, and found unavailing, the Legislature which created could destroy the Courts, and that without prejudice or inconveni­ ence. If the advocates o f Conciliation are right, incomputable b enefits would flow from these Tri­ bunals. If wrong, no m ischief or harm could re­ sult from the trial o f them. W hen the Convention by a decisive majority, adopted the section o f Courts o f Conciliation, our heart bounded with a joy, the fullness o f which it dare not utter. The apprehension o f what has occurred, m ingled itself w ith the hope that the Convention - w o u ld stand fast by a principle which, whatever e ls e of good m ight fail, would prove its crowning glory. T e x a s . — On the question o f dividing Texas in­ to tw o States, the Austin Democrat opposes it, on the ground that Texas as i t is w o u ld nr a few years be the N e w York o fthe South. The “ J o u r n a l o f C om m erce” thinks nobody can guess, now , whether the M exican War w ill be ended in six months or six years. It says: W e have reason to believe that Gen. Almonte, uot long before he left Havana, iu one of his let­ ters, to a friend here, expressed it as his opinion, that the only way to regenerate the Mexican na­ tion— to construct for it a common national senti­ ment— was in a vigorous prosecution o f the war.” The Journal, speaking of the Sub-Treasury, says:— “ B y the way, whether w e have a treasury or not just now, is problematical. The old empty iron room stauds within another room withiu the Custom House. That perhaps is deemed and ta­ ken to be ‘a treasury;’ but there is as yet no Sub- Treasurer General on the spot; and the circular of the Secretary ordering the Sub Treasury to go iuto operation last week, though published iu the newspaper, has not y et, as w e believe, been made known in any official form, and the union o f bank and State is still as fast and as strong as ever.— The receipts at the Government Treasury in New York, or no Treasury, as perhaps is the fact, are during these present days at the rate o f half a m ill­ ion a w e ek, aud the ‘disbursements about the same. Uncle Sam has considerable cash in hand, and receieves a great deal,.aud pays out as much, whatever the_ name o f the thing may be through which these intricate affairs are traasacted.” W e h a v e b e e n k in d ly p e r m i tt e d to p u b lish th e follow ing e x t r a c t from a le t t e r o f a p r o m in e n t citizeu of this State, now at the Rio Grande, to a geutlemen o f this v illage : M a t a m o r a s , M exico, ? August 16, 1S46. ) M r D e a r S ir :— Y o u r favo r o f th e 22d- J u n e , found me at this place, very busily occupied. * » » * * W e have som e 15,COO voluntaries, (ns the Mexicans call the volunteers,) on the Rio Grande all pressing forward toward Monterey and Saltillo, en route for M exico. It would not grieve me, however, to have our march arrested by negotia, tions for peace. This is a miserable country. My first impres­ sion was that it would produce any quantity of sugar and rice, for frost is never known, and the soil is sufficiently rich. But I learn that tho strange character o f the climate is an effectual ob­ stacle to systematic cultivation. They say it rains here for eighteen months together, and then that the country is burnt to a cinder by a drougth of equal duration. The battle of Palo Alto was fought on a vast plain wi.kout timber, (the Sth May,) the ground hard and dry. I was on the battle ground the other day— a vast savannah, the water standing to the saddle skirts. This is a rainy season and the whole country is inundated in the same way, so as to render cultivation impossible aud military operations very difficult. There are gardens iu this towu where the tropical fruits are cultivated, l’here are fig trees as large as our largest apple trees. Orange and lem on trees too grow here, but the fruit is uot good. The people are ignorant, debased, brutal—a mongrel mixture o f Castilian, IuJian aud negro blood, the dark streak predominating. Their re­ ligion consists iu superstitious observauce of the mandates o f the priests. The fashionable cos­ tume is, for men, slashed overalls, without sliirt or other covering, except a broad-brimmed straw bat, and a huge pair of spurs, sometimes upon the naked heel— o f females, a chemise, with nothing else— light and airy— w e ll adapted to the climate — of children , au. naiurel, that is, as naked as they were born into the world. There is a sav­ age hale betw e en tliese Mexicans aud the T e x ­ ans, and hardly a uight passes without one or more victims to the assassin’s knife or p istol on one side or the other. The Mexicans, however, get the worst of it. The country interior is represented as fertile, healthy, a n d iuviting; but it will never be brought to the Use intended by the God of nature by tin’s race, and sooner or later, the Anglo 8axon w ill press across the Rio Grande, and this mongrel breed w ill melt and disappear before it, as have and do the Indians farther north. But it is too soon for us to be spreading this w a y y e t ; there are vast regions of fertile country east of here to be peopled and cultivated first. I regret that I must be absent from our annual show this year. I trust the society and the mass will turn out in their strength, and hold W the imposing position w e so happily occupy. Our society is a great institution working great good for the agriculture of the State, and ouly requires to be prudently managed to accomplish still great­ er wonders than it has done. I rem a in y o u r f rien d . No. 7. of Harper’s P i c t o r a l H i s t o r y o f E n g ­ l a n d . aud No. 3 of Eugene Sue’s M a r t i n t h e F o u n d l i n g (price 6 ceuts a N o .) have beeu re­ ceived at I v i s o n ’s. POLK AND TH E W E S TERN HARBORS. His Excellency Jam es K. P o l k is fast follow­ ing the footsteps of the illustrous Statesman of Limlenwold. Under the administration of the latter, our Western Harbors were left to take care o f themselves, the money necessary to make them such as they should be, beiug required to make good tbe deficit caused by absconding Sub- Treasurers. The public implements were sold at Public Auction for a mere song. P o l k , feeling a deep iuterest in the success o f S t e v e n s o n ’s California Expedition, and needing a few millions o f dollars for that patriotic purpose, vetoed the River and Harbor bill, which has been passed bv a large majority of both Houses of Congress !— The Cleveland Herald gives the following as the first lruits of thut Veto. The people w ill have a word to say presently to those who thus basely betray their dearest interests:— [A lb. Jour. G r e a t A u c t i o n S a l e !— B y Order o f . I a s . K. P o l k . The question so much agitated iu 1344, “Who is Jam es K. P o l k ? ” is answered iu the notice below . Sailors, ship-owners, travellers, Democrats and Liberty men, one and all, ponder upon it and remember tbat during the three year’s reign w e are yet to have o f the Veto President, his sovereign w ill aud pleasure is that tbe harbors may look out for them selves, aud as great sums of money are wanted to carry ou our glorious war against .Mexico aud to buy Safes to Sub-Trea­ surers and t ) pay them their salaries, therefore, that all the p i l e d r i v e r s a n d c r a n e scow s on the Lakes be sold forthwith at A u c t i o n to the highest bidder for cash. W e expect daily to see an advertisement from our friend Cupt. S t o c k t o n lhat w ill read very much like what foil iws, which, in lhe exuber­ ance of our patriotism, w e insert without charge to the Government in the present embarrassed condition o f its finances. O f f i c e o f t h e P u b l i c W o r k s , ) Racine, W. T., Aug. 12, 1846. ) In obedience to instructions, I shall expose at public auction at the Harbor of Racine, on Thurs­ day, the 27th inst., at 10 A. M., all the property purtainiug to the public works at this place, con­ sisting in part o f the following articles: 1 pile driver, 1 crane scow, carpenter’s tools, boats, dw elling house, office, barn and shed, 1 lumber wagon, 1 sett harness, cooking utensils, common table furniture, bedding, &c., &c. Terms—Cash ou the day of sale. JAS. L. WOODSIDE, U. S . Agent. E5r* Affairs at Naqvoo are rapidly coming t i a head, aud the anti-Mormons w ill, it'is to b e hoped, be checked in their lawless course. Tbe old and new citizens of Nauvoo are banding together for defense, aud the state of excitem ent among them is o f the m ostiutense character. - They have about five hundred w e ll dicipliued men, each w e ll arm­ ed and supplied with tw e n ty rounds o f cartridge, and they await the impending contest w ith the determination to make it a desperate one. Tbe destruction and defence o f the Tem p le are the watchwords of both parties. The anti-mormons have assembled in lar^e nnmbers under John Carlin, the constable, who calls them his legal posse—gathered for the pur­ pose of securing the serving of writs on the citi- zeus of Nauvoo. M inute military discipline is observed, aud they have in their possession five six pound jrs. The Mormons have a like num­ ber of pieces. Governor Ford bas at last stepped in to assert the supremacy, o f the laws, and by a proclama­ tion, has confided the direction o f the civic pos­ se to the command of Major Parker, with fall au­ thority to preserve the peace, to accept the servi­ ces o f volunteers, to aid ia making arrests o f dis­ turbers o f the peace, &c. Armed with this au- thority, Major Parker issned, on the 2Sth ult a proclamation calling on all “ large bodies o f men assembling them selves together in various parts o f Hancock county, w ith the avowed iutentiou of disturbing the peace o f said county,” to disperse and not agam to assemble unless under his call’ To this proclamation Mr. Carlin made a reply' stating that the men under his command were as! sefnbled under him as a posse comitatns. That he had lega w n ts to serve on citizens o f Nan voo which writs had been derided, esnesciallv Wm. Picket, w h o had threatened vfolence. aud as soon as bis force was strong enough h e wonld make the attempt to serve them by force r J t t lJor Parker replied in a w a y that in- dtcated that he w a s not to be intimidated, and it 1 h e -has Promised to lead the citizens of Nauvoo against C arlin’s forces if the latter do not disperse by a certain day. A fight may there­ fore b e expected.— [ u . S. Gazette Hon. Geo. A s h m u n , M. G.., from Massachusetts wilt not only decline a re-election to Congress, but reigu his seat forthwith. ' F r o m C l a y s T r u e A m e r i c a n . TH E TRUE RESPONSIBILITY. There are som e who endeavor to shuffle re­ sponsibility from them, ou the subject o f slavery, and who, when they have done this, think they have done a great work. Kentucky has her share of this class. But they abound in the free states, and to them, aud them alone, may w e attribute the strengthening o f the slave power. Call up a merchant, or manufacturer, or politi­ cian, or churchman, even, of this class, in any of the tree states, and talk with him about freedom, aud he seems right enough ia a ll his general view s. Ask him if he does not believe slavery to be a curse, and he replies at once affirmatively. Bid hitn give an opinion as to its injury, North and South, aud he w ill descant eloquently agaiust it. But then, call upon him to act— tell him the time has come wheu ho must do som ething himself, and assume openly the responsibility of doing it, and he shrinks from the task, under some mean excuse or cowardly pretext. Johu P. Hale, of N e w Hampshire, in his speech delivered in the Legislature o f that state, referring to this topic w e ll remarked : “ Sir, i f God were to-night, to judge this people for the sin o f slavery, N e w Hampshire would drink more deeply of the bitter cup o f retribu tion than South Carolina herself. Last year, N e w Hampshire w a s a greater bar to liberty, stood more in the way of freedom, than South Carolina. Aud why ? I will tell you why. W hen the sub­ ject of slavery is introduced on the floor o f Con­ gress, a member from South Caroliua rises aud addresses the House. H e goes, o f course, in fa­ vor o f slavery— he speaks for it and votes for it— upholds it in all its relations—and supports, iu or­ der to sustain it, the gag-rule, the Mexican war, and every thing else which tends in its f ivor.— But of what avail is ali this 7 H e exercises no in­ fluence, not a particle— except so far as his o w n iudividual vote goes— because he is pleading liis own case. Slavery is his peculiar institution.— he was born under it, reared under it, and has liv ­ ed under it. H e must support it— lie cannot do otherwise But next rises a member from N e w Hampshire. Every eye is fixed upon him — eve­ ry ear is opened wide to hear what !.e may utter. Here—here is the feeling— here comes one from the “ Gibraltar o f democracy,” the mountain home of liberty, whose winds breathe o f liberty as they sw eep through her valleys, whoso eagles scream of liberty as they soar above her towering hills. What has he to say 7 The panting breasts of the oppressed throb high with hope that now, at least, some truth will be told that shall strike con­ viction to the mind even of the oppressor, some considerations urged lhat shall lighten the galling yoke o f bondage. H e speaks— and what is it 7— Gold, heartless, worthless commonplace. H e is in favor o f what? Why. o f liberty in the abstract — until t to assertion o f liberal doctrine touches the democratic parly, when l o ! lie turns round and votes side by side with tho member from South Oat’olillll, ju s t exactly, and just as far as the slave holder wishes him to*vote. Do you uol see that this man exerts more influence in favor o f slavery thau the other 7 Is it, not plain that his voice is ten thousand times mere potent than any voice from the South, to perpetuate the accursed institution and rivet still more tightly the fetters ou the thrall-bound slave 7 Let any gentleman deny it, if he can. Would to God it could be d e­ nied !” W e endorse every word tbat is here uttered.— That citizen of the free suites who votes with South Carolina does more, far more, to uphold slavery thau any citizen of the South can do. __ We care uot what pleas can be put in, or what e x ' cuse is offered, the fact is so ; and every mail out of the slave states who votes, or acts in anv way, to uphold or extend the slave-power, is not only a base apostate to freedom, but a base volunteer, to rivet and fasten down on au immovable basis, the accursed institution itself. Let the people of the free states understand them selves and the South. The South says slavery is a state institution, and no one beyond its borders has a right to inter­ fere with it. Legally, it is so. We presume all parties will assent, readily, to this proposition.— But liovv happens it, with this principle admitted ou all sides, that n ew slave states have been added to the Union 7 W hence came the annexation of Texas ?_ The South, iu itself, had not pow er to carry this measure. 1 1 was because slavery inter­ fered directly with the free states of tliis'Uuiou, and by the power o f patronage, and the power of party, by mean appeals to avarice, and the basest selfishness, bought, or drove, them into its sup­ port. No thrall had been worn now by men on the praries of Texas, i f the South had uot thus acted. No scenes of blood mid robbery would now disturb the repose of the valley o f tbe Rio Grande, through our instrumentality, if the slave states had not wrested from the North its rights, by tr*aehery or violence. The South says, again, when she has a favorite scheme to carry, or wheu the free States speak as become them,— “ I f you do not let us have onr way, w e w ill dissolve the Union,” B a li! The Union stauds upon no such sandy foundation.— There is no power iu the South to sever it. Na­ ture bas so linked us together, that w e could uot separate i f w e w o u ld ; and that man, in the slave States, who vaunts him self as adisuuionist, when­ ever slavery is mentioned, is a fool or madman. But even it the South could break np our govern­ ment, she would be the last to attempt it. The Union is her safe-guard. Iu it she findB protec­ tion to her property, and security for her life, and she would no more dare make an earnest effort against it, than sho would think of arming her ow n slaves to destroy their masters. Wherefore then, does she so often resort to the cry o f disun­ ion? For this reason and for no other; she be­ lieves the free States to be timid, time-serving, and avaricious, and she goes iuto their legislative halls and counting-rooms, ami manufacturing es­ tablishments, from Maine to Illinois, using this threat to persuade and to intimidate. This is her game; aud she has played it most successfully. In this way, in times past, the perpetualists o f the South have made all the free States succumb ser­ vilely to them, and even now, they hold a third of them as tlieir lacqueys to do, and carry out their low and selfish wish. We have no patieuce, when speaking on this subject, because w e kuow that there is not a nul- lifier, or leader of the perpetualists, iu the whole South, who has ever had one single fear or doubt, about the North interfering, as they term it, with the slave States. It is their sense of security that has made them so reckless. It is their perfect consciousness that the North would never violate the Constitution, to disturb their peculiar proper­ ty, that has caused them lo agitate pro-slavery at home in so defiant a spirit. We understand, all of us, the sensitiveness o fth e pocket-nerve. Does the hard speculator in Wall street agitate in a way to tumble stocks down 7 W ill the cotton buyers of Charleston or N e w Orleans, work to produce a fall in the article when their warehouses are full of it? Not they. Nor would the slaveholder, at any time, br in auy p lace, propose a dissolution of the Union, when snch proposition, i f seriously made, would double the peril o f his life and de­ stroy the value ofh is negroes; or proclaim aloud, that anti-slavery excitem ent in the free States, must endanger the peace o f his home, or the con­ tinuance of slavery, i f he really thought there was the slightest danger o f either. Trust him for that. No. If the belief existed at the South, that there was a pow er in the free States which could and would destroy slavery, the price o f negroes would fall every where, and the haughty and arrogant planters o f Carolina would be found, like arrant cowards, begging the North, in fear o f poverty and a hopeless social degradation, to let them alone. Aye, i f there w e re the slightest fear in this respect, w e should have no pro-slavery dog­ mas, or dictation in or out o f Congress, and south­ ern perpetualists, instead o f being arrogant and insolent, as they now are, would be the m eekest and quietest legislators in the lan d ! All this clap-trap about State interference— ali these threats about dissolving the Union, and all their haughty defiance against anti-slavery e x cite­ ment, have b een coined lies b o ldly uttered by per- pe'.ualists. to band together the w h o le South atld to frighten the North. And how have they suc­ ceeded in the free States 7 W liat has beeu their influence in their legislative halls and among their manufacturers, merchants, politicians, and church­ men 7 To the shame of freemen, let it be said, that tho perpetualists have, generally carried e v e­ rything their o w n way. One fact— (out o f hun­ dreds,) so-remarkable in its character, in this e o r- nectiou, that w e canuot pass it over in silence, w ill illustrate the e x tent o f this southern influence in the free States. Abbot Lawrence, some months since, undertook to write a series o f letters to a distinguished Virginian upon the causes o f the d e­ cay of Virginia, and the means of reviving her fallen greatness; and yet neither he, nor the vast majority of p resses who copied his able letters, dared to suggest the source o f that decay, Slave­ ry; or to sty out, honestly that nothing under heavens could reinstate her :n her ancient pros­ perity, bnt its instant removal! W ho, then, is responsible for the extension o f slavery 7 In the far future, and before the bar o f God, w h o w ill be held amenable for riveting tighter the chains of the black man, and spreading human bondage, With all its curses, w ider and wider, over this land 7 The men, and they only, who have truck­ led to the blustering and bullyism o f sou them per- petnalists—-they, and they alone, who have y ield­ ed to lordly threateners w h o would have slnuk aw a y from the contest, i f they had been m et with anything like a m a n ly front, or a courageous bearing, on the part o f tbe free States. B u t the past is past. L e t the present and the utu r e b e our care. And, standing on the vaunt­ ed doctrine, tbat the State is Supreme within its own territory, for all home purposes, let each free commonwealth resolve, jn her might, that no n e w slave State shall be admitted to tbis Union, and no slave territory be added to the Republic.— W ilmot’s proviso in Congress proclaims the true doctrine. L e t that be the unwritten statute o f public opinion in the free States, and le t him b e held, a traitor w h o shall seek to annul it, or quail before any spirit o f perpetaalism that labors to set it aside. The public w ill, so declared, w o u ld si­ lence perpetaalism for ever. I t would bring to the conflict of freedom armed hosts, aBd loosen chains, n o w binding tbe. lim b s o f m illions. It would ittspire Kentucky and every b o rder State w ith n ew hope, and spread light w h e re now are darkness and despair. Shall the free States fal­ ter in this cause 7 Can the freemen o f N ew Eng­ land. o f N e w York, aud Pennsylvania, or o f t h e mid-west, fail to range them selves on the side o f freedom? L e t them speak lik e patriots Let them rebuke avarice and cowardice, in countiug- r°°“ . church, and concentrate their united w fll lot ^ iatrVe hal1’ al)d Primary assem b ly, in re- t o i r i t universal liberty. Thus may Dreaent b| , . red.eemed. Thus and thus may the present and the future be made safe and g lonous. TRIAL OF E M. c s p b n o b r f o r t h b MURDER OF HIS W IFE o f the 14 o f July, waa sJt .l ’ f ® e v ®nmg the Court o f Oyer and Terminer, a t E e r ' e ^ N yesterday morning. The Court op e u e l at half past 10 when Chief J u stice Hornblower announ ­ ced thatguchalleugtagjurors,ho w o u ldbe govern- ed by the commou law . b Fur the prosecution there appeared Mr. Brow- J • • »» wiaowu vt/IA U ty } I J IA ■ ALA - ■ 1 o f this city, J . B . W illiamson, o f Elizabethtown, aud E . B. Wakeman, appeared as counsel for the prisoner, Ou motion o f Mr. W illiamson, the trial was posponed until this morning on account o f the a b ­ sence o f a material witness, C. C. Richardson, a merchant o f this c ity, whose testimony, i t was a l­ leged, would throw\ some light on this dark and bloody transaction. The presence o f this wit­ n e s s must be e n t i r e l y voluntary, as there is no law to com pel him out o f the state, or in a crim­ inal proceeding even to g ive his affidavit b efore a commissioner. It was, how ever, ou his promise of attendance this morning that the moUon was granted. ^ T h e court room w a s crowded w ith spectators. 7 he prisoner was dressed in black, wearing a frock coat; he appeared careworn audsoniQwbat em aciated and wra appereutly much concerned. Several members ot his family w e re p r e s e n t; his father arrived here yesterday morning, and his interview with the prisoner was heart rend­ ing ill the extreme. The old gentleman seems- qmte feeble and nearly distracted. The uncle, Joshua A. Spencer, ol Utica, and the prisoner’s sister and her husband, Mr. Barrett o f Jamestowp, Chatauque county, w e re also iu court. ^ Mr. Spencer lias no mother or brother, and his other sister, Mrs. Sheldou, of Ciucinnatti, has ior some time been insane. The defence w ill rest on the alleged insanity of the prisoner. On tins pomt a large number of witnesses w ill prob­ ably be examined. A jury will doubtless be em p ennelled in the course of the day. as the common law principle dues not e x clude those who have formed an opin­ ion of the guilt o fthe accused, provided that opin­ ion has uot been founded iu m a lice; nor those who may have conscientious scruples againstcap- ital punishment, E pes , th e M ur d er er , suspected of havino K illed his own S ox , his M other - in -L a w , ANSI a l s o a K e n t u c k y D r o v e h . — Since the fact has b e e n established beyond the shadow i f a doubt, that Epes, who is now at large, is guilty o f mur­ dering F. Adolphus Muir, late o f Diawiddio county, he has also been strongly suspected o f having caused the death ofseveral other persons lu tlio same county— and among the number, b i. own sou and the mother or mother-in-law o f Mrs, Epes. A few years since an e lderly lady— then an inmate i f w e understand correctly, ol Epes* house — was suddenly taken ill aud died. At the death of this lady, it seems, a large estate was likely to fall iuto the hands o f Epes, as guardian oi his children, who w ere to be the heirs o f their deseased relative. During the brief sickness of the lauy, Epes was k n own to have administered a dose o f medicine, or something which he pro­ fessed would give rebel to her. The dose had beeu given but a short tim e, when she continued to grow worse, aud soon expired. Nothing wasthoughtat the time, of tha sudden death ol the lady— her friends not dream­ ing for a moment that she had beeu unfairly dealt with. It is only since the development iu the Muir case that suspicion has been excited towards Epes, in regard to her death. IHias been only a few years, too, since a son of E ’s was killed, as reported at the time o f d eath, by the accidental discharge o f his gun w h ile he and his father. IV. Daiidridge Epes, w ere out hunting. The account of Epes' death, from the lips o f h is own father, b e iig so plausible at the tllllG,_ UO one o f course expected foul play ; but uow it seems that the son was heir to some proper­ ty which the falher wished tu g e t iu hisow n pos­ session. This circumstance, takeu iu connexion with others leaves very little doubt that Epes is the murderer o f his o w n sou. Nor does this end the chapter of liis crimes. H e is now suspected o fhaving murdered a Dro­ ver who has not been seeii nor heard from siuce he was known to have gone to Epes* house, to collect o f E. m oney for a number o f hogs sold. This was several years ago. aud as pretty good ouidonoe o fsnsnicion heins promptly attached to for disposing o f the Kentucky drover, the skeleton )f a grown person was lately, within a w e e k or so, w e believe, found iu an ice bouse ou the farm upon whioh Epe3 formerly resided.— [Richmond Republican. Gem. T a t l o r i s E u r o p e . — The Richmond en­ quirer publishes the follow ing extract from a let­ ter to a gentleman in Richmond : M a d r i d , July 26, 1346. la y lo r s victories have beeu felt more here, in Europe, even thau at homo. For tw o w e eks (be­ tween the sailings o f the steamers) our suspense was great; but, when the new s did come, each American strutted out as large as life. The pa- pers which had predicted Taylor’s capture as cer- taiu, w ere sorely used up. Taylor’s despatches have been greatly admired for their terseness, dignity, and modesty. t’he greatest compliment y e t paid to Taylor I heard ot in Loudou. W h en the steamer of Mav 16 h brought to England the new s o f Taylor’s dif- ficult posi ion, the Duke o f W ellington m et Mr. —; and the subject was introduced. “ W hy,” said the Duke, “ does he not do this and that?” (mentioning the steps he thought Taylor ought to take.) W hen the steam er o f Jane 1st brought the new s of his victories, Mr. ■ — m e t the Duke again. “ Your Grace,” said h e , “ must have been advising Gen. Taylor— for you see h e has done exactly what you said ho ought to do.”1— “ So he has,” said the Duke, as much gratified as though he had won the victories himself. A 9 I get this_ from G e n . to whom Mr. . . related it, it is undoubtedly authentic; exact in substance, and, I think, also verbatim. In Bordeaux I m et a w h o le eouled American, a “ live Yankee” ship owner, of N e w York, Mr. Holmes. H e is o f the stuff which, when abut - diiiit in a nation, makes it great. H e was at Tri- este when the new s of Taylor’s difficulties came. Americans w e re despondent, and the folks there teazed him w ith predictions of Tavlor’s capture. H e answered by tbat d ecisive Anglo-Saxon argu­ ment, the offer o f a bet o f $1,000 that Taylor would m e et the M exicans and rout them. H e found no one to take it, for Austrians are not bet­ ting people. Soon after, the new s of Thornton’s capture came, and the folks congratulated him o n his bet not having b een takeu up. “ Geutlemen,” said be, here is the thousand still, aud another on it, that Taylor thrashes the Mexicans.” They almost doubted his sanity— b u t a w e e k or tw o afterward came a single copy of Galigua- m ’s Messenger, with accouuts o f llie victories.— Its receiver carried it right to Holm es. Off he streaks it clown to the eight or teu American ves­ sels in port, aud calls up the officers. “ H o ist a ll your colors, boys,” said he, “ and com e tip w ith me to the Exchange.” Accordingly np w e n t eveiy piece o f “ bunting,” and off marched Holmes with the captains and mateB to the E x ­ change, w h ere they had o f course aroyal “ c row ” over the croakers. « W h a t the deuce is the mat­ ter w ith these Americans” eaid every body, as they saw this flag hoisting and marching. “ But,” 38 Mid, w ith a knowing shake o f t h e head, ‘ they soon found out w h y .” H o lm es wound up the ceremony b y giving the Americans and his friends a dinner inhouor ol Palo Alto and Resaca i Faltca. I relate this almost exactly as he related it to m e ; for I could not improve on bis graphic account. Mr. Swackham er offered a resolution, w h ich was referred, for a constitutional provision against the removal of the remains of the dead and for protection o f burying places against the afts o f incorporated societies or municipal corporations, unless by cousent o f parties. T h e Judiciary report w a s further considered. A section was agreed to authorizing Boards c f Su­ pervisors to provide for the election o f local offi­ cers not exceeding tw o in number to discharge the duties o f Judge and Surrogate, w ith pow ers &c. as the Legislature may prescribe. Mr. Richmond moved a re-consideration o f tho vote rejecting the section requiring parlies to suita to contribute to the expenses o f administering justice, &c. The vote was reconsidered and-after debate again rejected. Mr. O’Connei offered au additional section au­ thorizing the judgm ents decrees and d ecistonsof any local inferior court o f original c ivil jurisdic­ tion established in a city to be rem o v ed for re­ view directly into the Court o f Appeals, Mr. Van Schoonhoven m oved to extend the provisions o f the section to the County Conrt* pending this recess. H o n . W i l l i a m S a w y e b , says the Phil. North American, is still to b e linked w ith the destinies of the country, as h e ha3, despite untoward reports, been renominated for Congress, from the Ohio Maumee District, and itis sufficiently democratic to place h is election beyond contingency. T b e sausage makers at W ashington w ifi be cheered at this new s, and it is hinted that a privato refec­ tory w ill be fited up for liis Bole u se, behind the speaker’s chair. “ M u r d e r in a B a n k . T h e Boston Travel­ er stated,.tbat a few days since, a bill w a s thrust into the face of a President o f one o f the banks, w h n e h e killed the intruder on .the spot. Oat o f this announcement t h e lovers o f the horrible b a v e manufactured a “ terrible murder iu a bank,” b a t it turns o u t that the hill thrust into the fee© o f t b e bank officer was that o f a musquito!

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