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Auburn journal and advertiser. (Auburn, Cayuga Co., N.Y.) 1834-1848, November 01, 1837, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn87070067/1837-11-01/ed-1/seq-1/


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r e - m e n t equi- notes i s t a n t la r g e - b y lent, ct ion on of qua!- o tha cent it be m p - onto Ad- f fhe tter, ood, tate 0)18- not ose er, ator ce, ews e oi est but pie ess ich ami g o our ou, mg lay ent lity y- EL- o f this the ah, ich he ietl tho ed tr n - o f f oi di- y ; ore ra- ■v d nr! r i v i&*;' n jft- **d, «V Jr or- ut ss.- h e Is i- by >3- cr- d ’ e r rd f t ’ at' by >nv ro ■fT ni <1 w as ■ > es Id (■- » ■ tt (J 8 t 9' * VOL. V. A U B U R N , r C A Y U G A C O U N T Y , N . Y . ) W E D N E S D A Y , N O V E M B E R 1 , 1 8 3 7 . N O . 2 5 . jOXJItiS A L & A D V E R T I S E R : Pa jlished every W e d n e s d a y , at No. 1, Exchange r Buildings, by O L I P H A N T & S K I N N E R . rnBRMS—T o village Subscribers, w h o have tne paper left a t their doers, $ 2 per a n n u m . T h o s e who call for p apers at the office w i l l be furnish­ ed at $ 1 50, per annum , i f paid i n advanoe — otherwise $ 2 . WP A dvertisements inserted on liberal terms. ~ F R E N C H B U R R M A N U F A C T O R Y , A U B U R N , J V . Y . f g l H E Undersigned is extensively engaged in A manufacturing F R E N C H B U R R M I L E ST O N E S , and as no o t h e r than Selected Blocks are used in the m a n u f a c t u r e of M ill Stones a t this F a c t o r y , he respectfully solicits the atten t i o n of M illers a n d M i l l- W r i g h t s to an exam i n a t i o n of the q u a l i t y o f Stock and W o r k m a n s h ip. I h 8 Ve now on hand 3 0 0 0 5 I 7 E H B liO C K S , selected with the greatest care by my Forem a n , and I confidently recommend them to gentlemen on^a-ed in building mills, to m a k e th e best possible quality o f Mill Stones, and sueh as are wanted to m a k e first-rate work. All persons in- teresled will be furnished to o r d e r with any size Stone they m a y require for grinding eithes W h e a t or C o r n , and t h e Stones will in all case TT, V,\e as t h e y shouva- tre m a d e , and warranted first quality. 1 have also on hand the following M ill F i x ­ tures, which are offered a t wholesale and etail. ‘2500 Y a r d s New A n k e r Dutch BOLTING CLOTH, for G r i s t or Flouring Mills, much heavier, and more square in mesli than any oth e r Cloths in m a rket. T h e style ot Cloth is entirely free from furze, which renders so m a n y Bolls useless. 200 Polished Damselles, 200 L i g h t e r Screws, Hoisting Screws, W h e a t , Cockle, Che 3 s and Shorts W i r e - C l o t h , Mill Spindles, Bales and Drivers. O ’ T h e Subscriber’s k n o w ledge of the Milling Business generally, enables him to furnish tbe most approved numbers of Bolting Cloths, for the various purposes to whieh Millers may wish to apply them, either for G R I S T I N G , Flouring or Dusting Reels, and all Cloths sold by me will be warranted to be the real Dutch fabric, a n d i f not e n tirely satisfactory, p u rchasers wil 1 be a l l o w ­ ed lo r e t u r n them. A. D. LE O N A R D . A u b u r n , Dec. 1835. ___ Canal Coach Arrangements. A S T E M I E J V G E V E S . W A L L C O T & C O . A u b u r u , N. Y. • are e x tensively engaged in t h e m a n u f a c - S T E A M E N G I N E S , F o r R a ilroads, Boats, S a w mills, G r i s t m i ll s , B a r k mills, Furnaces, C l o t h i n g W o r k s , &c. & c. o f t h e latest im p r o v e m e n t s , and w a r r a n t e d of the best m a terials and superior w o r k m a n s h i p . Also all kinds of M A C H I N E R Y used in t h e m a n u f a c t u r e of C o l ton aud W o o l . B a n k Doors and Locks; Door*, G r a t e s & Locks for J a i l s and Prison. R i m and M o r ticr Locks, (a s u p e r ior article,) w i t h brass, plated aud glass knobs: C o p p e r T e a K e tt l e s and Boilers, S t o v e Balls, and o t h e r Stove T r i m m i n g s ; Eliptie Springs, m a d e of th e best E n g l i s h and A m e r ican Steel, and w a r r a n t e d . O ’ T h o s e wishing to purchase Stean: Engines and M a c h i n e r y will find i t t o th e i r i n t e i e s t to a p p l y . M e r c h a n ts can be supplied w i t h Locks, C o p ­ per W a r e , Stove T r i m m ings, E l i p t i e springs, ter. at t h e low e s t wholesale prices. Ail iimdicalions for work, either m a d e to us, or l e f t a t t h e H a r d w a r e Store o f H y d e , W a T- aocs te Co. will m e e t wilh prom p t attention. Atihnrn, J a n u a r y 1, 1835. HAT,CAP & TUR STORE. T . C A R P E N T E R , w o u l d inform his friend and the public, t h a t lie continues his busi­ ness in th e H a i l i n g l i n e , at the Uvell know n stand of C a r p e n t e r & Bodley, opposite t h e W e s t e r n E x c h a n g e , w h e r e he offers lor sale a c o m p l e t e assortment ofH a t s of the l a t e s t Fashion. N. B. J u s t received, and for sale a large assortm e n t o f B v r m o R O B i i s , G e n t l e m e n s Fur and Cloth Can® Gloves,Gol- ars, &c., Also L a d i e s ’ Capes an Boas. A u b u r n , O e t. 12, 1:536.-22 ' BOOKS FO R T H E S E HARD TIMES,” A T IVISON te T E R R Y ’S.— T h r e e E x p e r - imenls of Living,—Living within the M e a n s ,— L i v i n g up to the Means— L i v i n g be­ yond the Means, 15th edition ; S e q u e l t o d o . ; Elinor F u l t o n ; T h e Frugal Housewife, by M rs. Child; T h e Y o u n g Ladies’ F r i e n d , by a L a d y ; T h e Young W i f e ’s B o o k ; T h e Young H u s b a n d ’s Book, and m a n y others, for Sale V E R Y C H E A P . T H E Subscriber will r u n a C O A C H , D a ily, from M O N T E Z U M A TO A U B U R N , as follow s : Leaving M o n t e z u m a at 10 o’clock, A . M . on the arrival o f t h e P a c k e t from t h e w e s t, it will arrive in A u b u r n at noon. L e a v i n g A u- b u r n a t half past 2, P. M. it will arrive at M o n ­ tezum a in tim e for the Packet from the east,at5. 0 ' F ° r S e a t s , apply at t h e C a n a l E x c h a n g e and Junction H o u s e , M o n tezuma; and a t the W e s tern Exchange, Auburn. * N . P o s t . * Montezuma, A u g . 2 3 , 1 8 3 7 . — 15m3 0O=’“ E x t r a s ready every time” to convey passengers to any p l a c e . _______________ S. BALL, D e n t i s t . C O R N E R of W illiam a n d Genesee-sts, n e a r - t ly opposite the Am e r ican Hotel, performs every operation necessary fbr the preservation a n d beauty o f the T E E T H , in the neates m a n n e r ; lucorruptable T e e t h , o f a superior quality, and o t h e r kinds, i n s e r t e d . Having been a w o r k e r in Gold for m o re than 20 years,persons wishing T e e t h i n s e r t e d on gold plates, m a y be assured o f having it done in a s u ­ perior m a n a a r , ellhor by atmospheric pi essure or otherwise. T e e t h extracted with very little pain. Irre g ­ ularities of C h i ldren’s T e e t h rem e d ied. All Operations w a r r a n t e d to a n s w e r the p u r ­ pose intended,and done as cheap as by any other person w h o will do it e q u a ll y w e l l . Auburn, A u g . 23, 1837. Ploughs !! T T R A C E and L O G C H A I N S , for s a le a t H E W S O N & M I L L I G A N ’S No. 3, Exchange Buildings. F r e s h : t e a , p o r t o r i c o Syrrup, Porto Rico Sugar, Java aud R io Coffee. Ju s t received at No. 10, Exchange Buildings. J . S. B A R T L E T T & C o . T H E E X C H A N G E C O F F E E ROOMS, No. 1. E x c h a n g e B u i l d i n g s , I S now open for the reception o f com p a n y w h e r e m a y be found at all hours o f t h e day and evening r e f r e s h m e n ts o f e v e r y kind t h e sea- on will afford. Having a c o m m o d io u s room on the baseporeh floor, private D i n n e r and Supper parties c k n b e accom m o d a t e d at s h o r t notice. Fam i li e s can b e supplied w i t h all kinds o C a k e , P a s t r y , Jellies, Ice C r e a m , P i c k l e d Oys ers, a n d other delicacies on m o d e rate teim s . B o a r d i n g w i t h o u t lodging, will be f u r n is h e d on as l o w term s as a t any other establishm e n t T h e proprietors hope by s t r i c t a tt e n t i o n to t h e omfort o f t h e i r friends to m e r i t a shar o f t h e i r patronage. A u b u r n . J a n . 20th. 1836 y a p H E Subscribers a r e J L m a k i n g , and a lw a y s have on hand, th e most approved kind of P loughs used iu t h e c o u n t r y , m a d e o f t h e best m a terials a n d w o r k m a n s h i p , a t t h e i r F u r n a c e in M e c h a n ic street, opposite Leonard and W a r d e n ’s Stone Mill. W A R D E N , B U R G E S S & CO. A u b u r n . A p r i l 19, 1837.-49tf W I L L I A M S ’ A N N U A L R E G I S T E R For 1837, much enlarged, is for sale at the bookstore of Ivison & Terry. CBOCZBBT. T O H E Subscribers are now receiving their Spring s lock of China, Glass and E a r t h e n - W a r e , aDd w ill re-pack to o r d e r all articles k e p t by t h e t r a d e , at th e L o w e s t N e w Y o r k prices, for C a s h . M e r c h a n t s m a y depend upon h a v i n g good articles and well pack e d , on the above term s . E x c h a n g e B u i ldings, No. 6 . A B B O T T & F O S G A T E . A u b u r n , May 3, 1837. -61 T H E C A Y U G A C O U N T Y M U T U A L IN S U R A N C E CO. TSY B I S Company being now duly o rganized, is J L prepared to r e c e ive a p p lications lor m S U R 4 N O S , s>'*ri to issue policies thereon. vVhen the principles governing such c o m p a n ies become more generally k n o w n . i t is confi dently believed th a t they will meet, as they most assuredly m e r it, very general patronage. Any perron being desirous o f i n s u r ing in this Com p a n y , will be required to pay one dollar and fifty eeDls for s u r v e y and policy ; also, five p e r c e n t upon t h e prem ium , in cash, to c r e a t e a c o n tingent fund to pay expenses, te c . ; and give a note for the residue o l t h e p r e m iu m , which wt-U Ko r o fnI-'oA l>y ik a r»nm p a a y t o m o o t loceooy- in case the contingent fund shall become ex­ hausted. Each D i r e c t o r is authorized to r e c e ive a p p l i ­ cations forinsurance, and persons desirous o f ob­ taining information upon th e subject, aro reque3- ed to apply to either of the following Direct* ors, tv> w i t : Jonathan Richm o n d , Eleazer B u r n ­ ham , Seneca W o o d , Edw i n B. Morgan, Ben­ jam i n Gould or David W r ight, of Aurora ; — G a r d n e r Chidester, of L a v a n n a ; John M o ­ sher of Springport ; Dennison Robinson of Port Byron ; Seneca B. Dennis, or Charles D. Fitch o f Scipio; Arletnas Cady of M o r a v i a ; or L u m a n Sherwood of G e n o a , or to J o h n E W i l l i a m s , Esq. w h o has been duly e lected The General Agent, fo r t h e said company. D A V I D W R I G H T , Secretary. D a ted at A u rora, June 6 , 1837.-4 9 t f CROCKERY II A T w h o l e s a le or retail.—A great variety of n e w patterns of C h i n a and E a r t h e n T e a Sets, w h i c h w i l l be sold at very l o w prices by IS H A M . 7, E x c h a n g e Buildings. A u b u r n , Oct. 4, L837. BRANDRETH’S Vegetable Universal Pills. EWSON & MILLIGAN, No. 3 Exchange Buildings, agents lor the sale of the above. HOUSE BELLS, A N D B E L L Trim m ings. A general assort­ ment kept c o n s t a n t l y ou h a n d . Also house and door Bells hung and fitted up to o r d e r on short notice, by J. H . C H E D E L L . & Co. Ju l y 2 7 , 1337. _______ . __________ lty n 3 ___ LA M P O I L & S P E R M C A N D L E S . r JjNHE Subscribers offer for sale Lam p Oil & A Sperm Candles, o f a pure q u a lity, directly rom N e w - B e d f o r d ; Also an extensive assort­ ment of Glass Lamps, Lamp Glasses, a n d Luci- e r and Loco-Foco m a t c h e s . E x c h a n g e Buildings, N o . 6 , A B B O T T & F O S G A T E . M a y 2 3 , 1 3 3 7 —2 ____________________________ B A T H B R I C K , R o tten Stone, G l u e and R o s i n , a iresh supply, j u s t received and for S a l e by H E W S O N & M I L L I G A N . 3, E x c h a n g e Buildings. O F F E E M I L L S — w r o u g h t and cast, a few o f very s u p e r ior quality, to be had at llE W S O N te M I L L I G A N ’S. 3 , Exchange Buildings. € C 1 To Call at No. 7, T H E subcriber is now offering at his Store, HATS! HATS! K e y e s & s m i t h , have j u s t received from New York, the latest Spring Fashions for H a ts . One door west of R. Muir. A u b u r n , M arch 25 — 44 EL E C T IO N NOTICE. A G E N E R A L E L E C T I O N is t o b e held in the county of Cayuga, on t h e 6 th, 7lh, and 8 th days of November next, at which will be chosen, the officers m e n tioned in the notice from the S e c r e t a r y o f S t a t e , of w h i c h a copy is annexed.— Dated A u b u r n , this fifth d a y o f Au­ gust, in t h e y e a r of o u r Lord one thousand e ir iit hun d r e d and thirty-seven. 0 V i z : A Senator for the Seventh Senate D i s ­ trict ; one C l e r k three M e m b e r s of Assembly and two Coroners for t h e couotv o f Cayuga. W A R R E N P A R S O N S , Sheriff. State o f New-York,Secretary's Office, \ Albany, A u g u s t 1st. 1837. ( S i r :— I h e r e b y giv e you notice, t h a t a t th e n e x t general election in this S t a t e to be held on the 6th, 7 ih , a n d 8 t h d a y s of November next, a Senator is t o be chosen in t h e Seventh Senate District, in t h e place o f T h o m a s Arm s trong, whose t e r m o f s e r v ice w i l l expire on the last day of D e c e m n e r n e x t - JOHN A. D1X, Secratary of State. To the Sheriff o f ihe County o f Cayuga; N. B. T h e Inspectors o f Election in t h e s e v ­ eral t o w n s in y o u r county will give notice o f the election of M e mbers o f Assembly, an\* for fili­ ng all vacancies in C o u n t y Offices w h ich m a y exist. 13 F R E S H G R O C E R I E S C H O I C E a s s o r t m e n t o f G r o ­ ceries, j u s t received a t N o . *G, M e r c h a n t s R o w , H . P O L H E M U S & A u b u r n , M a y 17, 1837. H R *7,) E x c h a n g e Buildings, __ a large assortment of Ladies’ M iss’s, and C h i l d i e n ’s S l i p s , w ith different varieties of thick w o r k , such as Gentlem e n ’s F i n e Calf Boots, Shoes & Pum p s , m e n ’s, boy’s and chil­ dren’s thick boots, shoes, and brogans, of his ow n m a n u f a c t u r e , at U N U S U A L L Y L O W P R I G E S ; T h e quality and w o r k m a n s h ip o f which, in ev­ ery r e s p e c t he w a r r a n t s equal t o those o f any Snop in t h e V i l l a g e o f A u b u r n . Call and see i f it is not bettor to s a v e tw o or three shillings w h e n it can be done as well a not. JXThe public may be assured that ‘he a- bove shoes are n o t madein any State Prison, or Penitentiary, but by honest industrious journey­ men, all of which are warranted by ISH A M . A u b u r n . Ju l y 19, 1837. 10 S T O V E S . H EWSON & MILLIGAN, No. 3 Exchange Buildings,are now receiving a new supply of all the various patterns, and intend to keep th e m o s t c o m p l e t e a s s o r t m e n t p o s s i b l e of the article; and having in connection with their other business a suitable manufactory, ihey are enabled to m a k e th e pipe and other trimmings, for any kind o f stoves, and put them up if re­ quired, to the entire satisfaction ofthe purchas­ er. ___ ______ A U B U R N and C a y u g a C o u n t y B a n k Bills will be received, and half per cent prem i. um allowed on all old debts, and also, owe per cent on Goods sold at N o . 4, Exchange Build­ ings, w h e r e a splendid assortm e n t of goods, has j ust been p u r c h a s e d a t the present ex t r a ­ ordinary low prices— Cloths, Cassimers, and Vestings, in great variety. Also, ready-m a d e clothing, Cheap for Bank notes. ffjTCall soon, or you w i l l l o s e t h e chance* S. C . D U N N I N G & Co,Tailors Sc Drapers. N . B. No Specie r e c e ived, unless by partic­ u l a r request. A u b u r n , M a y 17, 1837. ____________ I t a f / A i A C O A T S —F R O C K C O A T S , O V E R O U U C O A T S , CLOAKS, PANTS VESTS &c. &c. &c. T h e above clothing “ is now being m a d e , ” and comprises a g r e a t e r variety t h a n was ever before offered in A u b u r n . T h e prices, not­ w i t h s t a n d i n g the high pressure tim e s , are IEFEery Loto.^qi a n d t h e p u b l i c w i l l find i t much o t h e i r a d v a n tage to call, exam i n e , and p u r ­ chase of S. C. D U N N I N G & Co., Tailors and D rapers, No. 4 , E x c h a n g e B u i ldings, A u b u r n . J a n u a r y 2 5 , 1 8 3 7 . - 3 7 Children’s Primers I O L I P H A N T te S K I N N E R have just com ­ pleted an a s s o rted variety of T O Y B O O K S , which will be furnishod to Booksellers, Pedlers. and others, at the lowest rates. TO M E R C H A N T S . ~ ~ M U R F E Y & W O O D R U F F are agents for th e sale of E P e c k & C o . ’s s u p e r ior w a d ­ dings, w h i c h t h e v offer for sale by the b a l e at th e M a n u f a c t u r e r ’s prices ; also the N e w York M ills B l e a c h ’d a n d B t o w n Sheeting, a t the N e w Y o r k prices. Auburn, Sept’ 19,1837. R O W - B 4 R S , D i t c h i n g Shovels and Pick- Axes, a good supply, ju s t received by _________________ MEW SON te M I L L I G A N . M E W GOODS A H D N E W PR IC E S . J S. B A R T L F . T t’ & C o . a t their New • Store, No. 1 0, E x c h a n g e B u i ldings.having lost by fire, and sold since m o s t o f their old stock, are enabled to offer to their old customers and the public, a very l a r g e and almost e n tirely new Stock of Goods, purchased at the late very red u ­ ced prices, and selected with great care, com­ prising most o f t h e n e w sty l e F a n c y , as well as staple D r y Goods, which they will offer cheap for cash, or a p p r o v e d credit. Am o n g their dry goods, a r e a g r e a t variety oi Q u a li t y and colors of IV r o & t V U l o U i s . Cassim e rs striped and plain, ) , Sattinetts do do J v e r y cheaP’ F i g u r e d and plain G r o De Naples, a spleudid stock Blk, G r o D e R h i n e , real Italian & o ther Blk. Silks, French prints and printed muslins, v e r y r i c h . April 26. A For Sale. T H E L o t o f L a n d known as th e Lew is T h o m a s F a r m , c o n taining 80 a c res, s ituated at Boult’s Corners in Scipio, the s u b s c ribers offer for sale at a great bargain, l t 13 located in one of t h e m o s t pleasant parts o f t h e county, near a c h u r c h , s tore, a n d T a v e r n . O n (he Farm is a good H o u s e , Barn, O r c h a r d i n g , tec. It is well w o r t h y the attention of any one wishing to purchase. T h e T e r m s o f p a y m e n t will be m a d e easy. [EFFor f u r ther particulars, enquire o f Slocum H o w l a n d , at S h e r w o o d ’s C o r n e r s , or o f the Subscriber in Auburn. I f n o t sold by tlie 15th o f April, it will be rented. R . C. STEF.LE. A u b u r n , M a r c h 16, 1837.-45tf S P L E N D I D P A P E R H A N G I N G S . T7. F . D O U B L E D A Y , I N V I T E S his friends a n d th e p u b l i c , to ex- . araiDe his new s tock o f P a p e r H a n g ings,Borders,F irescreens, tf~c. C o n s i s t i n g o f m o r e t h a n one h u n d r e d different patterns, and s e v e r a l thousand pieces. Ills gold bronze, and L i t h o g r a p h i c papers, far e x ­ cel any papers before offered in this m a r k e t , and equal any ever offered in N e w - Y o r k . His stock has been put c h a s e d at t h e l o w e s t rates, and m e r c h a n t s acquainted w i t h the N. York m a r k e t will allow th a t his papers generally are sold in patterns for rooms considerably l o w ­ er than the New Y o r k prices. A u b u r n , M a y 1 st, 1837.— 5! IYIS0W & TERRY, H AVE this d a y opened a C l R t U L A T I N G L I B R A R Y . Terms. A r t . 1. Subscribers pay in a d v a n c e , on com ­ m e n c ing or r e n e w i n g s u b s c r i p t i o n s . F o r a y e a r , - - $ 5 00 ) F o r four d u o d e - F o r six months, 3 00 ) cimo, or 2 o c t a - F o r 3 months, - 1 50 j vo volumes a t For 1 m o n th, - 63 J a time. A r t . 2 . N o n -Subscribers pay for the books as re t u r n e d : for each duodecim o o r s m a l l ­ er volum e per w e e k , s i x p e n c e ; for each octavo volum e , one shilling. A r t . 3. N e w P u b l i c a t i o n s : — F c r the first 3 m o n t h s after they are put in c irculation th e y are to bedetained b u t t h r e e days at on tim e . E x t r a copies ol N e w Books will be added to the L i b r a r y . A r t . 4. E v e r y person receiving Books, m u s t return t h e m in t h e same nam e in which they w e r e received. T h e y m u s t not be l o a n e d , nor charged from one person to another, w i t h o u t first being r e t u r n e d to the Library. A r t . 5. E v e r y person defacing Books, by tea ing,w r i t i n g , &c. will be c h a rged t h e p - ^ e of t h e b o o k s s o injured. (CTSeveral Periodical W o r k s are placed u the L i b r a r y . T h e L i b r a r y is opened w i t h 800 volumns, to be increased to Fifteen Hundred, on o p e n i n g of n a v igation. A r r a n g e m e n t s are for receiving th e new publications as th e y issuefrom th e press. Several valuable P e r i o d ­ icals a r e placed in t h e L i b r a r y . T O TOBACCO C H E W E R S .-II. P o l h e m u s & Sop, have j u s t received a fresh supply o f that very desirable article, M rs. M i l ler’s Fine C u t chew i n g Tobacco & sm o k i n g ditto. G e n tl e m e n don’t forget th a t the a b o v e is to b e found at N o . 6 , M e r c h a n t s R o w . 1 H A J f D E L I E R L A M P S . - f h e subscri- 1 bers, agents fbr the Patentee a n d Manufac­ turer, keep on hand a supply of L a w r e n c e ’s pat- tent Chandelier Lam p , both plain B r i t a n i a and ornam e n ted,together with the Globes, *br sale by the dozen, at t h e m a n u f a c t u r e r ’s price, adding ransportation. Also at retail. These L a m p s , have alm o s t entirely superse­ ded in use the Livei pool and other s u s p e n d ing L a m p s , and are believed to excel any other Lam p s ever invented. T h e y are well adapted to light Churches, Factories, Hotels, Stores, and all places w h e r e a suspending Lam p is r e q u ir e d . JNO. H. C H E D E L L & CO. D i r e c t l y opposite the W e stern E x c h a n g e , G e n - esee s treet. A u b u r n . March 15, 1837 - 4 4 t f J U S T A D D E D T O T H E C IR C U L A T IN G L I B R A R Y . N IC K of the w o o d s ; a T a l e of Kentucky by the a u t h o r of C a l a v a r , tec. Snarleyyow , t h e Dog Fiend by M a r r y a l t . T h e Y o u t h f u l Im p o s t e r ; by R e v . W . R e y ­ nolds. F a l k n e r ; by t h e a u t h o r o f F r a n k e n s l e i n , & c . Abel All n u t ; by the au t h o r o f Hajji Baba, Z b h r a b , & c . T r a i t s an d T r i a l s of E a r l y L i f e ; by L . E . L . G o d o lphin ; a n o v e l . Will Watch; Dy the a u th o r o f Cavendish,4jp C a m p e r d o w n : or n e w s from o u r neighbor­ hood. Mrs. A r m y t a g e : oi F e m a l e Domination; by the authoress of M o thers and D a u g h t e r s . Colton’s four yea r e in G r e a t Britain. O u t r e M e r r or a Pilgrim a g e beyond t h e s e a . C r u i s e of t h e Potom a c ; with appropriate engravings ; by F r a n c is W a r r i n e r , A.M . N o . 9 , E x c h a n g e Buildings. IV I S O N & T E R R Y . A u b u r n . April 18, 1837.-49 E A R C H W A R R A N T S , and most othe B l a n k s n e a t l y ptinted., f o r sale by O L P H ANT & SKINNER. From the Oasis. T O M Y GREY H A I R S . “ W h e n c e do ye come ? and why so soon Bedeck’d in hoary white. Ere life hath reach’d its sober noon, Much less its sombre night? W h e n ce do ye come? and wherefore now Dost make me look so old ? W h y cluster thus around my b row. So thick, so grave, so cold? “ Hath Jove, with his too flatt’ring wiles And artfulness been there ? Or hath his treachery, iu smiles, Produc’d a change so rare ? Hath he been false? hath he deceiv’d? H a th he his trust betray’d ? H»th he thy wearer’s tosom griev’d,' Ancl thus this difFrence made ? if. “ Or friendship his young h e a rt beguil’d, And promis’d scenes of joy, In accents soft, serene and mild, While meaning to destroy ? Have her professions all been vain? Her bold assertions too ? All vanish’d like an early rain? Ot like the glilt’ring dew ? ” Or sickness dire, hatli she been there, W ith her attendant woes ? Commingled with her e v ’jy care— H e r p a n g s - h e r pains—her throes? H a th she perform’d liar office so Unfeelingly and store? T h a t thus ye visit me? A h I let me know , VVhy are ye come-—once more? “ A n s w e r me—oh 1 n-hy are y e com e ? Hath worldly strife or ill Call’d ye thus early from your home, T h u s soon my bbod to chill ? Ilave love, and friendship, and disease, And worldly care combin’d. To rifle hope ?- - t o biffie ease? And enervate t h e i p i n d ? ” “ All have conspir’d, aid do conspire, T o call us to thy vihv; T o kill eaeh hope— tc quell each fire, And shew thee all tntrue. No ray is left; all, albs care. Despondency and gbom ; No feeling left but fell (espair— No solace but the torib.” “ Then welcome, ye monitors o f t r u t h — W e lcome j e sages wise : I bid farewell to themesof youth, And look beyond tlie skies— W h e r e not a trouble nor asigh Shall mar iny peaceful Ireast— Where, in a paradise on Bgh, T h e weary are at r e s t.” A lphonzo . From the London Despatch. T H E S T R E N G T H O F T Y R A N N Y . T h e tyrant’s chains are only strong W h ile slaves submit to wear them ; And, who could bind them on the throng Determined not to w e a r them ? T h e h clank your chains, e’en though the links W e r e light as fashion's feather, T h e heart which rightly feels and thinks Would cast them altogether. The lords o f earth are only great W h i l e others clothe and lied them ! But what w e r e all their pride and state, Should labor cease to heed them ? T h e swain is higher than a k ing, Before the laws o f nature, T h e monarch were a useless thing, T h e swain a useless creature. W e loil, we s p in, w e delve the mine, Sustaining each his neighbor; And who can hold a right divine T o rob us o f o ur labor ? W e rush to battle— b ear our lot In every ill and danger— And w h o shall m a k e the peaceful cot T o homely joy a s t r a n g e r ? Perish all tyrants, far and near, Beneath the chains that bind u s ;— And perish, too, that servile/ear, W h ich makes the slaves they find us. One grand, one universal dairn— One peal of moral thunder— One glorious burst in freedom’s name, And rend our bonds asunder I s T h e H ome .— E xtract from a letter written hy Mr. C. C. Cadv, one of the suiviving passengers, which wre find in the Concord (Nr. LI.) Statesman MR. C A D Y ’S L E T T E R . “ All wont on well till Sunday noon, when the sea was heavy and the wind blew hard ; but we were told there was no danger. The wind continued, and Monday was a sorry day— all wore long faces— heard no remarks but in regard to our situ ition. At about five o’clock our fears were increased— the boat began to leak and our captain lay drunk in his office / ! Luckily we bad two experien­ ced sea captains on board, who took th<‘ command, and then immediately ordered all ha..ds, male and female, to dipping water, which order every one complied with fill w© found our?elve& on shore. Then it was that a scone occurred which 1 pray God I may never again Witness. One hundred and forty souls screaming, wailing, dying 1 Some crying to wives— some to mother?, some todaughiers and sons— some imploring mercy from on high— some frantic with agony, dashing themselves amidst the crumbling wreck. 1 stood on the wheel house, ifext to a man and his wife, and such pitiful groans as came from the poor creatures are wholly indfcscribible. Cioj-'e by me, also, stood a woman, with a child, and, as she hung on the wreck with one band, and her darling in the other, a surf came nnd washed her child from her ; and such was her fright that she leaped, and with a most piteous screech exclaimed, “ O my child,” and disappeared forever! I remained till the last one, and was fortunate enough to be one ofthe few survivors. After reaching the shore, [ immediately commenced hauling in trunks and bodies, and was fortunate enough to find old Mrs. Laco«te, about half covered with water, just expi ring, [and saved her life. Presently I found others who were as fortunate as myself, and we divided— part went for assistance and part kept on shore watch­ ing for trunks and bodies. The wind blew violently, and being drenched with water, and some of us entirely naked, could only keep alive by travelling. The two ladies who were saved we carried to a sand bank and covered them mostly in sand. But few escaped without being badly bruised. In this condition vve re­ mained till daylight, about six hours ; you may judge our feelings. At daylight we found ourselves on Ocracoke Island, among a set of savages. There were a few families who did every thing in their power to relieve us, but most of them appeared indifferent, and only visited u* to see what they could steal. But very little of the baggage name ashore, and what did was so badly injured that it was not worth saving.” Our Senator .— Our readers will see by the proceedings of the W hig Senatorial Convention, that J o h n M a y n a r d , Esq. of this county, is nominated as a candi­ date for Senator. We receive his nomi­ nation with pride and pleasure. He is extensively known in this district, and only known to be admired and esteemed*- Amiable in p r i v a t e life, of unsullied integ­ rity & possessing talents of the highest or­ der, Ue will do honor to any station, and is eminently fitted by his counsels, in this period of darkness and gloom, to remedy the evils of the '‘'•experiment?' and resuscitate the country from the effects of political quackery. He is emphatical­ ly one of the people. He has no bank stock, to be sure— and keeps no shaving m ill; and to tell the truth he is p o o r — his honesty and generosity have made him so— but he is a good citizen, a sound lawyer, and an experienced legislator ; and being a laboring man himself, he is well qualified to represent the interests of the farmers and laboring classes. We commend him strongly to the sup­ port of the Wbigs of this district ; and we promise for him in this county the most that untiring zeal and resolution can accomplish .— Seneca Falls Courier. Mr. Maynard is a man of souQ.d^Irar- acter and well fitted by bis legal ^ ^ p o l ­ itical knowledge, for a Senator. He can be elected, if the opponents of the admiB- istation in the 7 th District will do all .their duty. —Ontario Repository, L I S T E N TO W IS E C O U N S E L . The Whigs now occupy a proud posi­ tion. They are now well called the re­ lief party of the Union— to which the suf­ fering are every where stretching their hands. They stand strong in the faith of principles which have been tested, anxious only to restore peace and security to a troubled land. The success of these principles are vitally important to our political salvation and private welfare. Let every man, therefore, who loves his country help forward, by every proper effort the great revolution which has commenced with such mighty and resist­ less force in other states, and which is destined to sweep over this state, over­ turning tbe rotten fabrics which corrup­ tion has been years in rearing. The o-ne great binding principle which should animate and concentrate the whole body of American freemen at this crisis, must be the restoration of integri­ ty, wisdom, and stability to tbe National Councils* Ear this they should labor with a zeal that never tires, and with one heart and one mind. The*e is no other object of importance to be compared with this. In the language of a con­ temporary, unless th-it power, grown at last so stupendous as to overshadow the whole land, and, like Aaron’s rod, to swallow up all others in itself, be restrict­ ed to the useful purposes for which only it was created, our condition will shortly be little better than that of lbe miserable Russia serfs who are sold with the soil they till. That words like these are something more than sound, bear witness the des­ olation ofthe land from south fo north ! “ Perish credit,” was the cry of one' whose name has become synonymous with sycophancy and\ partisan servi!ity--=- “ perish credit,” credit has perished— perish commerce/’ commerce has per­ ished too. Our fair tranre is dishonored abroad, our ships lie rotting at our wharves at home. The grass is spring­ ing in our commercial streets. Half fin­ ished walls are crumbling silently in what were once the busy marts of trade. The merchant at his desk tells moodily over the sum ofhis past losses,, and sighs at the thought of wh it the morrow may bring forth.— The clerk lounges idly over the counter, or gazes listless up the street after the unfrequent customer.— The doors of the factory are closed, and its wheels are motionless. The early ham­ mer of industry is rarely heard. Thou­ sands of workingmen, deprived of em­ ployment are exhausting the slender pit­ tance which they had reserved for the weakness of age. The alms-houses are full to overflowing, and medicants are praying for charity at the corners of fhe streets.— A ll this, when winter too is approaching, with a thousand horrors in his icy breath .— JSTetvark Sentinel. Voice o f the People. — We used to hear a great deal about the voice of the people, from the administration and loco- foco papers ; and this voice they used to claim, was expressed by their votes, given at our elections. Lately,this class of pol­ iticians appear to have forgolten how the voice o f ihe people was manifested, and we hear little about it. This voice has, how­ ever, been speaking iu a most audible manner, in the recent elections; its notes of terror have been heard in the Capitol at Washington— it has alarmed the little magician of the White House, and the Kitchen Cabinet; and such men as Tab madge, Rives, King, of Geo. and Tipton, hitherto the most efficient supporters of Che;past and present administrations, have in the Senate ofthe U. S., openly denoun­ ced some of the prominent measures of the government. In reference to these suicidal measures, Mr. King of Georgia, said, “ N o couniry can prosper under such a state o f things as has been under the administration o f General Jdckson and Mr. Van Buren As evidence of wbat the voice of the people now is, bs they have expressed it tn their recent elections, we will state the vote given in November last, at the Pres­ idential electionr in those States in which elections have been held during the last six weeks, and compare the two together. Indiana gave a Whig majority in N o ­ vember, of 8803— it now gives a Whig majority of 17,40$— W hig gain 8600. Tennessee gave a Whig majority in N o ­ vember, of 9842— it now gives 22,000 Whig majority— Whig gain 12,l5& Kentucky gave a W hig majority in No­ vember, of 6338— it now gives 20,000 Whig majority— Whig gain 13,662. N o rth Carolina gave a Van Buren ma­ jority in November, of 3660— it now gives a JVhig majority of 5 7 1 7 — net Whig gai n 9377. Rhode Island gave a Van Buren majori­ ty in November, of 255— it now gives a Whig majority of 1021— net Whig gam 1276. Maine gave a Van Buren majority in November, of 7661. (in September be* fore, 9?00)— ifnow gives 500 W h ig ma­ jority— net Whig gain 8161, These six States show a net Whig gain of 52,340, M r. Van Buren was elected President by a majority of only 25,000, excluding j the entire vote of South Carolina, where ; the Electors were chosen bv the Legisla­ ture.- Nohing is more clearly evident thatt the fact that a majority ofthe people are nolff against hi m.-^Connsctiiitt Cour ant; _ _______________ A Tb*e f o r e v e r y t h i n g . — Eveiy day & every teason has duties peculiar to themselves, and duties which in order to be well done, discharged at the proper time and in the proper place and manner. There is a time to sow and a time to reap; — and so of eve^y business that engages the attention of men wnether domestick, civil, religious or political. The' time is just at hand, when a most important pol­ itical duty is to be discharged;— a duty as imperious, as incumbent, as useful, as and other that comes within the province of moral obligation. An annual election is to take place— and thereby the master spirit of our institutions, the genius of the Ballot Box , is to be invoked — its influ'- ence to be called into requisition and its controlling power brought to bear up­ on the destiny of the Republic. Such an occasion occurs but once a year,— and during the intervals of time that elapsed, men have the opportunity to reflect— to examine the acts ot their.i ulors— to pro­ nounce upon their beneficial or inju< ious tendency— to make up their minds delib­ erately in the premise?, and fo act in ac­ cordance with- the dictates of duty and patriotism. The developements of the last three or four years— and especially ofthe current year— a/e of a curious and inter­ esting character, and seldom indeed, does the history of any country afford a par­ allel. The calamities to business, tbe revulsions in trade and commerce, the drying up of all the streams of prosperity, the suspension of specie payments, the total prostration of the currency, and the bankruptcy of the government which had on hand but nine months since forty mill­ ions of dollars, all these things, in time of profound peace, have occurred within a short year— are indeed passing strange, and may well excite both the astonish­ ment and the indignation of the people, and they have not occurred without a cause. The general government is tlie great balance wheel in the national ma­ chinery, and when it runs true and uni­ form, all the minor wheels will in the main keep their places and perform their offices;— when not, disorder,derangement, and confusion throughout tho whole will most certianly ensue; and such is now the case in the affairs of the nation. The grand balance wheel has been for years getting out of order, and eveTy year had become more and more so, till finally the explosion has taken place— the crisis lias come, and the condition of the country arid the gov­ ernment is now what it is. That profli­ gacy, corruption and mal-administration have mainly done the work— have brought about the result— havo produced the Catastrophe, no intelligent man can deny. The seed has been sown, and the harvest is now gathering.,- Those who have sown the wind, are now reaping the w h i r l ­ wind. We say in the conclusion, then, the affairs of the government nee > look­ ing after—-every man is interested in do­ ing it— the times demand it, and patriot­ ism requires the duty at (he hands of eve­ ry elector. Let, therefore, no friend of good government, of sound measures, of wise and upright administration, be in­ active, slothful, or indifferent at the ap­ proaching election .— Troy W h ig. Innate Antipathies ,— Several of the pa­ pers have stated that in Yermont, there is, or lately was, a young man who could not Speak to’ his father. Previous to his birth, some misunderstanding arose between his parents, under which the Wife refused for a considerable length of time, to speak to her husband. This child, born after their reconciliation, began to talk in due time and without difficulty, excepting with his father, in whose presence it was entirely dumb. This continued till the fifth year of the child, tbe father using all his powers of persuasion to induce the child to speak. At this time he tried threats and punish­ ment, to overcome what was supposed to be obstinacy ; but the sighs and groans of the little sufferer plainlv indicated that all attempts to speak were unavailing. Time produced no change:- ail attempts of the son. at years of maturity, to converse with his father, elided nothing but bhtcr sighs and groans. The NeW York Era relates a similar instance in a child about five years of age, who is thrown into an agony of terror at sight of his father’s sister. Prev ous to his birth an altercation, accompanied by an assault,- ensued between his mother and his father’s sister, and this antipathy of the child has been exhibited ever since its birth. The case of James the I. of Eng­ land is familiar to all. He' was always thrown into an agony of terror by fhe ap­ pearance of a drawn sword. Th'tsr vvas doubtless produced by the bldo’dy assas siriation of David Rizzio in hts mother's presence, a short time before bis birth. Individuals have partialities or antipalthfes in relation to various animals, articles of food or other things. Some cartnot endure the presence o f a cat, others are thrown into convulsions bythe\ odor of cheese,- and others, as Shaksp'e'are says, cannot endure a bagpipe .— PuUid Ledger. Candid admission. — Mr. Cambreleng in pressing for the immedia'fe passage of the Treasury note bill, s Jd ; “ T H E T R E A S U R Y lfrA g iN S U C H A C O N D IT IO N T B A T T H E S P E C IE C O U L D N O T B E O B T A IN - E D F O R A L I T T L E D R A F T O F E I G H T H U N D R E D A N B E L E Y E N tfO L L A K S .” And is it come to this? The Govern* nrent of the United States without a Na* tiomd debt-*-» ith a surplus last year iu the Treasury ol forty millions ! is so rev duced—so tra'nkrupted by corrupt pulifh cins, that il cannot meet the payment of $ 8 0 6 in s p e c ie 11 \ And are these the R u lers to be sustained by a free, honest, and a patriotic people ? Never— never. — N . Y. Star. , . Tea —AVhen used in India, large quan­ tities of cloves and cinnamon are gener­ ally infused in it. The beverage is high­ ly pailafahie, and is the usual refresh­ ment presented by tbe native princes to their European visitors. IM P O R T A N P T O FA R M E R S . In the winter of 1819, a disease pre­ vailed among fhe cattle to' an alarming extent; some farmers lost more than one. half. I had af this time nineteen head of cattle on my farm, which were kept confined to the barn yard; they Wer?\ watered at a trough standing near a log- house. I watched closely those that Were affected with the disorder, and fhey would very often, after they had drank, turn to the old log house,-ahd. endeavor to eat the clay from * e t w e e n the logs* that is, when the ground was hard frozen and covered with snow— knowing tK t all animals are governed by instinct, antf s e l d o m e a t th a t which is not b e n e f i c i a l , I determined to try the experiment accordingly, I procured a quantity of clay and offered it to them in piece? of a pfoper size, which they greedily ate from my hand ; they were afterwards fed with clay twice a week until the snow disappeared, and never were cattle healthier, or in better condition when the spring opened— and since then to the present time, 1836. My horses, cattle, calves and sheep, when the snow and frost has prevented them from obtaining clay for themselves, have been supplied. I have fed it to calves in the spring and summer, and it has never failed to restore them to their appetites when they refused to eat, correcting all acidities of the stomach, and stopping all scourings, as magnesia does in children. As to calvesr I have never lost one in winter, and of sheep only two in a hundred since I com­ menced feeding on clay ; and out of one hundred and forty sheep during the last winter I lost not one, and most of them' were good mutton. During last winter, the sheep of Dr* Butler, an extensive woo! grower, were taken wilh the scours, and many died before he was aware of it ; he immediately had a quantity of clay dug up and thawed and fed to them, after which he lost not another sheep. I am perfectly satisfied that it is as neces­ sary that cattle and horses should have clay given them in winter, when tha ground is covered with snow, as it' is that they should have salt in summer ; aftd a# to sheep and calves, I would rather mine should do without satt than without clay* — Cultivator • The Whigs of New York should recol­ lect that the first JMonday o f November next is rapidly approaching. On that day an im p o r t a n t contest will commence at the polls th r o u g h o u t o u r S t a t e . Its result will decide the political character ofNew York for another yenr* In many respects the election is not so important as it was the last year. The choice of public servants at this lime is confined to members of the State, Legislature and county officers. But although we have no President or Govern*- or to choose, yet the election is of great importance to the welfare of the country, from considerations connected With the administration of our national government. And at no time, since the orgHniimion oj our fectute, has fhe choice of members o f the Legislature required more vigilant ht~ leotion from the people, than al the cem. ing election* Every Whig elector should ask him­ self the question “ has every thing been done within the sphere of my influence to promote the success of the cause, which I believe fo be essential to the prosperity of the country ?” If this question cannot be answered in the affirmative— if eveiy thing has not been done that can and ought to be done; if there has been irtactiv* ity where vigilance should have been ex­ ercised— let there be no further delay in discharging every duty called for by the exigencies ofthe time's. Principles and doctrines are now pro­ claimed and enforced by the power of government and the influence of party discipline, which threaten to eu&veit the cherished institutions of the country. The State or New York is caffed upon — to sanction or reject them. The issue is fairly presented for consideration ; and it should be met and decided with the in­ telligence and discernmen*, which should characterize the conduct of free citizens. Let the question be fairly tested— let every voter be brought to the polls— let tho Whigs discharge their whole duty— and our word for it, the result will be a splen­ did triumph of correct principles.— Tro y W h ig * A man in Tennessee has obtained a ver­ dict of $2000 and costs, against some per­ sons in that state, who had inflicted upon him the discipline of Lynch L a w . The plaintiff had fallen under suspicion as a slave-stealer, and had b< on seized in the dead of night by the defendants, who con­ stituted themselves a Lynch court, Died him, convicted him, and then proceeded t, punishment, by inflicting, 100 lashes with a cowskin, branding him on the cheek with lhe letter R, and commanding him to leave the country.— Buff. Pat. “ Paddy, do you know how to drive V* said a traveller tc the“ Phse’on” ofa jaun- ting car. “ Sure I do/’ was the answer; “ wasn’t it I who upset yotrr honour in a ditch two years ago Jhiimal M agnetism .— Tw o editions o f Col. Stone’s pamphlets— the first of 2000 , and the second of 1000 copie? __ have beep executed and a third is in the press. The Science appears to excite attention at any rate.— Af. } . Cour. \T Foreign Editors in China .— At Canton editors are treated as wild beasts, and ex­ cluded from all society and public places. The people call them Fan-kivets, or F o r­ eign Devils* A Regency office-holder— gone ! — We have Been informed, on good authority, thaft John Beach, one of the Regency Commissioners of loans for Niagara coun­ ty, has taken u French leave,” and that Certain queer transactions in which the people’s money was mad^ to act a prom* inent part. wi/J s ion be made public !— . Buffalo Daily Jour. E d i t o r i a l L a b o r s .— We learn tb«t wife of one of the editors in A u g u s t a , Ga. has lately presented her husband with four pretty boys — Mobile Examiner. The population Of the city Tof Toronto is J 0,871. Incfease during the year, 1219.

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