OCR Interpretation


The Fort Edward ledger. (Fort Edward, N.Y.) 1857-1865, January 22, 1864, Image 1

Image and text provided by New York State Library

Persistent link: http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn84031837/1864-01-22/ed-1/seq-1/


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r n i-' ^i' ’H'’ t ■ - ' .a s * * £ s ; , - •— *,. ■ '.■ - K T 2 :, ■ , , ■ , -1. •>v TT •';'>• / -:'r n.i' c’ !-■• . ■:' . ► . t , >i . ...,.. ul ■ , , , i- ,,j. » ■ d ■ '■ •*l- . 4?: I • 'f,,. I' / v>1 V 4^ n o s ''i.i,*n'.- '' T O i. a r r 5 F O E T E D W A E D , F E I D A T M O E N I N G , J A N - 22 , 1864 . N O . 40 . ‘ F o e t E d w a e d L e d g e r . . - I . 0 BX.ISHKD EVERY FRIDAY SIOBNIX6 , AT t :r6aTEnW AED, WASHINGTON Co., N. Y. ,' ■ . -■*' b y JltilffilS H. m p & EBWIIJ P. EAT, \ lEditors and Proprietors. ■ TERMS : '$ 1.25 PEB YEAB, I lf A-DVATStCa^, C)£ce one Door Horth of Harris’ News Ho(mi, i^Htairs RATES OF ADVERTISING i ’One square, (12 lines.) 3 weeks, ........... §1.00 Each sabsequent insertion, ................ 0 25 ‘One fourth column, one year, ................. 15 00 ‘One half co^mn. one year,......................25.00 One column, one year ............................... 40 00 - L ^ a l notices published at the rates pre­ scrib e by statute. A ll advertisements must have the required number of insertions noted, or they will be inserted till ordered out ahd charired accordingly. Special Kotices 15 per cent, additional. Business Cards §1 per liise. Marriages Deaths and Obituary Notices inserted/ree. A ll kinds of job work executed with neat­ ness, promptness, and at prices which defy •competition. All Communications connected with the •Office must be addre-eod to H ARRIS & RAY, F ort E dward . N. T . 0. E & S. S. BEXNETT, ‘OROOERT AN D rEO Y ISIO X STORE Three doors north of Bapiist 1 biirch. EDW A R D S. IJUBBEL & Co., O E N E R A L assortment of Merchandise, foi sale cheap. W. J. WlIiTEtlOUSE & CO, DEALER'm Drugs, ModicJnes. Paints, Oils •and AftJsts’ Materials. Kingsley’s Block. ^E O . r . CONANT A CO.. l3SA-OKSM n’Fl and general repair shop -Mill street. Good satisfaction guaranteed ' ?n all cases. D e f o r e s t & i e y i n g , a IANUFAO T U RERS and Dealers in Fur­ niture and Coffins ol eveiy dehCription.— Two doors north ot Baptist Church. T H A Y E R & HOLTON, IVIANUFACTUBERS and Dealersin Sash Doors and Blinds. Job Planirg and Matching done to order. . NeiiP the Blast Futuace. R . S . C O L E A I A N , ;gitt0Viw0 ixm\ CoimsijcUxa* at F ort E dward , E\. Y . E d g a r H u l l , ITTONESY k COUNSELLOR AT U W , FORT EDW AED, N . Y . JUBSGN KINGSLEY, PRACITCAL ARCHITECT, Seminary Street.Fort Edward. N . Y . J. J. FLINT, M. D., iP l a y s i c i a i A a n d . S t x r g e o n , Port Edward, N . Y. M r s . H . W . C A R T E B , iSrear Oomei Seminary and Mechanic Streets. li^ O S K of all kinds done to order at the. Vw iowrt'it possible price, and warranted to tSt. Stitching' on one of Singera’ celehnted Machines, by the yard or hour. :^:6:26 J. J. ESTEE, M. D., I P i i y s i c i a i i a n d S u r g e o n , Office.at Clark's Hotel, Sandy Hill. Aoyr’mesiiage fer Dr- EMt<>e-CBn he aBeft.Aith& Orag store «f Whitt-house & Co. asnd wjU receive prompt attention. S T O V E S A N B ' H A R D W A R E I # i M i i E i i m w s Tpr-AS'on hand always a cpfoplele assort- J B L ’- , meat; of all kinds of S2 W E B A A m WARE', TIN WARE, f ipojf, lead PIFJ3. PUMPS AC.j AC., Jhbb£)i^ done with promptness. Cll and see. Fort Edward, N . T . 20;tf AdminhrfraterB-'Notice.' ’ / ll^O T IC i^ i? ;!i‘^rhhy according to x\'^ a w 'to alfpetedufe W claims agaujst Jdfeh* Milier,^,Mte. of,the town of Fortft«l: ^ rf(]uir.dj&q ,e^- td ll its^oTtaid Teaidpnc«iti F^»rt ^♦y, ,of , I'a'y. - 'AdAitifstfatof; M A U ldlT Adouaistnirix. < From the New York Examiner, U p t h e m il. $1,000 PREMIUM. $1,000 Will cause Hair to Grow on Bald Heads; will Restore Grey or Diseased Hair to its ORIGINAL CONDITION AND COLOR; Will Prevent the Hair from Falling < ff and promote a New and Healthy Growth ; Completely eradicates Dandraff. will prevent and cure Nervous head­ ache; will gi\T? to the Hair a Clean, Glossy Ap pearunce, and is a Certain Cure for all Diseases of the Head. P r c e O n e D o l l a r P e r B o t t l e . It is a perfect and comjilete dressing for the Hair, Read the followinji teriinnoMal: U. S. M ahsiials O fficb . New Yoik. Nov. 6 , 18G1. W’^M. GRAY, E^q. D ear S ir —Tvro months ago my head wa.s almost entirely bald, and the little uair I had was all grep and tailing j out very fast, until 1 Fared I ^houId lose all. { 1 commenced using yonr Hair Restorative, and it. immediau ly stopped the h ir fulling off, and soon restored the color, and afirr us­ ing two b o ttle s my head is completely cover­ ed with a health} growth of hair, and of the 1 same Color it wae in • arly m a n h o o d 1 take , great ]ilea.-ure in recommending your excel-j le n t H ir Restorative and you may also re- j let niiv doiibtilig p. n-i n to me. . ROBERT M U R R A Y . U. S. Marshall. ; SouUiein District, New Yoik, | Forsoleb’^ the proprietor (V\ ]\1. HHAV.) ' at the RE8T0R A IJYE DEPOT, 3 0 1 B R O A D W Y , N E W Y O I I K , And by all Drugjiists. 22:} 1 F I N K L E A LYON 538 BROADWAAL NEAV YORK. To parties little acipiauiled with the Fin kle A Ly<*n Sewing Machines the. tardul pe- lusal o! the Conipaiiy's Circular is s] ecially coinmended. 'I'he Ci cular oau be had on application. It is Very specific, and will be loiind highly insti no'ive, liaviiigr bi en prepared wiih much care aid we aid abioe i'y all Mat! merits thereii! m ade. 'I’he lollowii.g fmel q-n tution is character­ istic of the entire Circular : *• Tills Machine m better adapted than any other sewing muchii e if maiket to the tre- j quent chiuge.- and almost ej,dle.s.s varie'y of ' sewinu ncpured iii a family ; for it will s< w li'om one to tw« iitj tliicki est-ee of Marseilis without siop|it)g. and make evir\ stitch { er lect. Will sew fri-ni the fit e>t gauze to the heaviesi cloth, ami e \tn the stoniest liainess leather, without chat ging the Fed, needle oi UDsiOD, or making any adjustment of machine whatever.” Thus have we snccissfiilly overcome the must difficult j'Oint in the sewing machine a*t. It was no oid.Dory triumph. Defiantly Win WH now say • N o other macbine compares wi'h it in this resj.ect.’ Hence, have we uni­ formly ---- almost without except ion-----taken the- highest premium, whenever the nmebine has been properly exldbiitd in competition with other first-class sewing machines. HeT ce IS it that we are able to • ffer the lollowing guarantee, viz : ‘ W e warrant every machine we sell to give better satisfaefion then apj other sewing machine in matk t. or tm>ney refunded.” We never ei 11 a machine on any other terms. '1 he guarantre is as reliaible as the note of any business « an in ihe latd.— For more than five years have we lelind on such facta tor the r< puiatu-n of «,ur inai bine; and without a single Itavrlljng agtDi in the field, there JS scarcel} a neigl bi.ihood on ihe continent wheie the imu hii e is i ot favoibly known. 'IVe pn fer such a reputation to one ba.sed on mere “ talking points,” as thiy are iccknically called in the trade. Hence we make but one kind of stitch, viz., the. lock­ stitch, alike on both sides, requiring Oily one-third the thread of olhei kinfis of stitches. N. B. Local Agen’s wun'ed in every county tliTonghoiit the west. Special in ■ducementa i ffer d. FIN K L E & LYON S. M. Co., 'B:4l:52 538 Broadway New York. FORT ED W AR D MO I T & SON against and against THE W O R L D !. | FO-RT HDWA.RD'l U y \ H 0 :j^eep-& 9 nstautIy onTiajd a fulll and T * complete assortment of Canada Pine Lumber, dressed and mulressed. hrarniig timber o f any (engfh and size required — Doors.' Sash, Blinds, Pine Pickets, Lime, Cement, Ac. f. M. M ott & S on also kee|> a large ard well selected Stock of F lour , whiih they offer at ' and^'^retaiJ. at pri/es defy­ ing c^igipej i-ttop. Me/cltanfs 'atiaiaH Fltiuf- D*^aVrfj. ht^thls a.i}d euffbunding towns ;ar^ par:^ic,n)arlf inyited tp and exaai^e, pitr assoHtnent o f IF lour , before sending orders to Troy p t Aft)»ny..aK we- pledge oUrselveB to supply-j^l jjftrtiep QR as fkvotable terffik'ftt) least) ^aa can tbe ob titined a t .either of rhoae citier, or elsewhebe, * March 28, 1862. 3 Bf 28 :tf I had b e e n g o in g Rp. tip for th e la.st hour, and \vn« s t i l l far from th e top. C o u ld i t b e th a t Sarah’s p o o r ly-sh o d l i t t l e fe e t accom p lish ­ ed th is jo u r n e y every-B n n d a y ?— th e th o u g h t m a d e m e b r e a s t th e b ieah , snow y w ind m o r e stead ily, till hy-and-by I co u ld stop to take breath, and at t h e sam e tim e a sur­ v e y o f m y w h e r e a b o u ts. I f i t had b e e n Ju n e in s tead o f D e c e m b e r , I sh o u ld have sh iv e r e d for very d e s ­ ola t io n — a.s I lo o k e d about th e h i l l ’s su m m it crow n e d w ith sm a ll co m fo r tless dw e lling.s, and th e n off over steep , sto n y f ield s , w h e r e here and th e r e a d i.sco n s o la t e c o w vainly so u g h t for sh e lt e r — o ff to w h ere gray h ills sw e p t th e gray horizon. M y finger.s w e r e p lea d in g for my warm firesid e , and m y h e a r t too, u n less I cou ld h a v e p o w e r to re­ lie v e all th e w a n t I saw ab o u t m e. I asked som e cold - look in g children w h e r e m y sch o lar lived . ‘ S a rah— oh, s h e liv e s dow n th e lane in the brow n hon.se.’ M o re lik e a shed than a d w e lH n g lo o k s Sarah’s hom e, and th e .'’m a ll old wom a n w h o an­ sw e r e d m y k n o c k lo o k e d very like a w itch or fairy in d isg u ise. B u t all su c h th o u g h t s varii.shed as I i fo llo w e d Sarah’s grandm o ther-into | th e room m a d e ,'imoky by a fire ' th a t hardly took aw a y its ch ill, and m o r e bare than one cou ld im a g i n e .' ‘ S a rah is very bad to-day, M iss; sh e catched cold Sunday, and th is w a t a e r m a k e s i t w o r se.’ { Sure en o u g h , th e r e was t h e ch ild curled up on a straw p a lle t clo s e : by th e fire, th o u g h her ch e e k s and , th e hand slie e^ladly stretch e d o u t ; to m e burned w ith fever. ‘ G randm a said you w o u ld n ’t com e ; b u t I know e d you Avould’— and I g u iltily rem e m b e r e d how tem p ted I had been to p u t otf th e vi.sit t ill a p leasan t e r day. ‘ I didn’t know you cam e so tar to Sunday s c h o o l ; no w o n d e r y o u ' took cold la s t Sunday, it was so ; very cold.’ j ‘ S h e ’d go as far again — p o o r j th in g ; Sunday’s t h e only day 1 can j .spare her, for now m y rh e iim a tiz i.s So lifid she has to [lick up all th e chips we burn, and fetch m e k n it­ tin g from th e v illa g e . I t w a ’n’t so : before h e r fath e r w e n t aw a y ,’ said th e old w o m a n p it e o u s ly . j ‘ l i e w e n t to th e war, Sarah to ld m e.’ ‘Y e s , h e ’liste d th e very first. H e w a s m y la s t son, and h e ’s k illed now.' th a t my little b a s k e t contained, and by th e b r igh t plaid shaw l th a t 1 TV-rapped a b o u t her sh o u ld e r s . H e r gratitu d e was boundles.s,hut in h e r 'eyes th e r e w a s .such a p e c u ­ liar lo o k o f g la d n e s s th a t 1 a.sked h e r w h a t sh e was t h in k in g of. ‘ T h is m o rning,' sh e rep lied , ‘ in m y prayer I said I was sick, and Avouldn’t our fath e r g iv e us m o r e than our d a ily bread to-day, and h e has.’ J u s t th e n th e door op e n e d , and a s h a b b y m a n en t e r e d w ith an arm ­ fu l o f w o o d . ‘ T h o u g h t y o u ’d lik e som e fire,’ h e said aw k w a rdly, w h e n h e saw m e. ‘ I t ’s fire w e do lik e , and y o u ’re a good sou l, P e ter, to th in k o f u.s.’ ‘ I t ’s for her,’ h e m u t t e r e d , as if asham e d ol h is kindnes.s— and j u s t ca t c h in g Sarah’s sm ile, h e w e n t out. ‘ W h o ever w o u ld o f th o u g h t it o f drunk P e t e r ? ' exclaim e d t h e old Avoman. D e e p e n in g dusk in th e sm o k y room w a rned m e to begin m y de­ sc e n t ; b u t n o t till a good fire o f P e t e r 's dry faggots, and th e few com forts I had b r o u g h t ,g a v e prom ­ ise o f w h a t care c o u ld do for th e ir co m fo it . Y o u m a y b e sure all th a t could b e done w a s done sp e e d ily, and very soon Sarah returned to Siin- dtiy .school lo o k in g rather b e t t e r than b e fore, and f itted , I tru.st, m o re fu lly to receiv e ra'any a truth, th a t sh a ll he a source ot p a r ity and con­ te n t t o h e r own h e a r t— and m ake h e r ever a l i t t l e m in ister of good to th e d e s o la t e and darkened hearts about her. T ills is all m y stor}', for I can't te l l h o w Sarah’s life w ill ‘ turn! if w lia t i.s told has t a u g h t j any little S u n d a y sch o o l ch ild any­ th in g , I am glad. I have a dre.am dow n in m y h e a r t, and you m ay h a v e it too, t h a t som e tim e th e old wom an and th e little girl w ill he m a d e happy by th e return of t h e ir lo s t so ld ier ; and I hope, i f he still liv e s , he m a y be k e p t all th e tim e u p r igh t and w o r th y am id t lie tem p - j ta t io n s ab o u t him . H o w n ice it j w o u ld be if s o m e good book or pa- | per you or I sh o u ld send to th e ' arm y sh o u ld h e lp k e e p som e f a t h e r j or son w h o has le f t a ]d e a s a n t [ h o m e pure till he retu r n s to it, or I fit him to go to a B e t t e r H o m e , i f ' h e m u s t never c o m e back any m o r e . i A n d m a y be som e such in flu e n c e 1 m a y reach th e la t h e r o f little Sarah, w h o liv e s up th e h ill. sheet o f jiaper, which was substitu-, ted for that written on, was exactly the sanie size w ith it, he appeared not to be aware o f the change ; anti he would continue to read off his composition from the blank sheet ofl paper as fluently as vvhen the m anu­ script lay before; him ; nay, more, he would continue his corrections, and introduce an am ended passage, writ­ ing i t upon the precise place in the blank sheet corre.'sjionding with that which it would have occupied on the already w ritten page. Such are^.the fapts of som n am b u ­ lism ! T h e ecclesiastic, in'deed, seem s at first to have seen through a sh e e t o f pasteboard; but the con- Im n c lred or th r e e h u n d r e d an d fifty p o u n d s , w e , h a v e str o n g su s p ic io n s th a t th e fa u l t lie s so m e w h e r e in th e k e e p i n g or m a n a g e m e n t o f sto c k . A g o o d sta b l e fo r s t o c k sh o u l d b e j r o - Y ided u d t h w iiid o t v s to a d m it su n l ig h t , it sh o u l d b e d r y an d w e l l - v e n f i l a t e d , a n d th e sa m e g e n e r a l r-,des fo r h e d lth a p p lic a ­ b l e to p e r s o n s sh o n i d b e e v e r b e f o r e th e e y e o f t h e farm e r , an d g u i d e h im in h is tr e a t m e n t o f sto c k . T h e r e is no anim a l o f m o r e uni- vers.al valu e than s w in e ; and every clndina foot in his case shows that <=nttager m a y k e p one or tw o ani- , r, , i • . 1 . nials on th e w a s te m a terial of th e he really used Im percepnon only Io | oth e r w ise be identify the size and place of the | Y e t .i n m a - sheet of paper. IJis w ilting upon it respects,' no anim a l is m o re tieg- was the mvchtinical tninsc.j[it uf an I Piifs are g e n e r a llv a llo w e d act of^ merttal _ p enmanship. T h e , { p , p,«t. c h a .ice irfa barnyard ; th e y corrections lell into the right ])Iaces i what, oth e r anim a ls leav-e, upon the ]mper, owing to the fidelity ,vhat no o th e r s w ill e a t ; and a with which he retnined the mem-nl piom re, his attention being ex c lu ­ sively concentrated on that one t p e - ratiou. Unpunctual People. W h a t bores they are; what havi c iieap o f h a l f decayed straw i.s th e ir only bedding. 'J'hey are called “ d irty,” b e c a u s e th e y are com p td- lecl to live in th e dirt, or becau s e th e com forts o f life cannot be oth ­ erw ise obtained. Y e t no anim a l m o re b ig h ly ap])rcciafes a good, ‘ A r e y o u sure, h a v e you beard so ? ’ ‘ W e’re sure, b e c a u s e for m o r e ’n a year b e sen t u s m o n e y and l e t ­ ters regular, and sin c e , n o t a word t — s o t h e ch ild ’s an orphan we know , and I, I'm a lon e , lo n e w idow , and ch ild less too,’ and th e l i t t l e figure sh o o k v io len t ly . T o seti one so old and feeb le cry j m a d e m e cry too, and I cou ld think | o f no w o rd o f com fort till Sarah j p lead e d , ‘ D o n ’t fo r g e t m e , gran d m a ;' y o u ’ve g o t m e , grandm a , don’t you | know ? a n d w e ’re took care of, and som e day w ill find fa t h e r w h e r e j J e s u s is.’ ‘T h a t’s t h e w a y s h e alw a y s talks, and so m e t im e s sh e sin g s w h a t sh e : learns at Sunday s c h o o l, and s h o w s j m e p ictu r e s in h e r little papers— i .‘?ee h o w sh e has p u t ’em up round th e r o o m ; and sh e reads th e read- in’ too, ^ u ite w o n d e r ful,’ said th e old w o m a n p r o u d ly, w ip in g aw a y th e t^ars w ith h e r w r in k led hand. ‘I fim very glad little Sarah re­ m e m b e r s h e r hym n s and le s s o n s so w e ll.’ ‘ S h e ’s n o t h in g e l s e w o r th t h in k - in’ of, M iss. I f y o u w a s to see, h e r Sunday afternoon, w h e n som e o f th e children th a t don’t go to an y sch o o l, and m e n and wom en too, com e in t o h e a r h e r sinjg and te ll th e B ib le stories. S o in c t iin e s she. g iv e s aw a y h e r papers— h u t i t was hard w h e n I had to lig h t th e fire w ith one to-day, i t xhadc'her cry in sp ite o f herself. I t is one, o f th e m b o y s th a t ’fe t c h e s us ch ip s now sh e ’s sick, H e has a bad nainef J a k e y ha.'f, b u t h e ’s p r o m ised Sarkh h e ’ll go t o S u n d a y schbol, i f sh/fill billy g e t wel-t.* Sarah was ’tQ.s8ing about, as out 'of br'e^i-h a s ‘h er doting grandmotl^- 'er Tvais, -aifd I \^lad to relieve *nd by the few 'flaiutieg they make Avith the precious niu- ’ dry, cleHc, com furtable dw e lliug. merits o f orderly, .sy.steiiiiiiic men o f ! anim a l is m o r e careful, business. A person who is faiihless th u s ju-ovided, to k e e p on­ to his appointnieuts may not intend j sep a ia t e their food, b e d d in g to swindle p.onlc, hut he does. To One great reason those who know hi w to turn tim e to I f^ e k-eep- „,lva,i,iii.e, Lveiy h„„|. In . ..n 1 cf.ihle pecunr.rv value; m inutes, i c i i 1 . 1 “ n. v ‘ , “ , ' . tilth and th e p r o n t s ot th v i t t e x i s t - even, lire vv„rth e„ im ich a|,i.-ce, lie | j t j l i e ex p e r im e n t lias who ro IS you ot them , in i-lit j.ist ij, o f ciirrv in if h o s s , ami it as well lake so iiiiieh money irom I grow th your purse The act is petty larceny ; opd fa t t e n i n g ; and nnotiier exper- or grand larceny, according to the in ien t was m a d e, by w a s h in g th e m am ount of tim e he coinpels you to w e e k ly, w ith soap and bursh, and w aste, and the value of- it, at a fair th e in c r e a s e over th o s e n o t th u s appraisal, to yourself or your family. ■ tr e a ted was found by w e igh in g to T h e only capital of a large jioriiun be as 5 to 2. of the com m u n ity is tim e . Thi-ir Farm lahorers should be hired in compensati->n is measured by the ' season, as the best will be eiig=iged clock. T h e m om ents o f which ivavly; and it often hajipens that in jiromise-breakers cheat them may paying a thdlar or two more per represent, in fact, the necessaries of ! m o n th , a greater am ount in valuable life, and the loss of an hour may in- ^ assistance will he secured— or in cth - volve the jirivation of a loaf or a er words, t'ue best are geiiem lly the joint, or some other article urgently : cheapest. needed at home. Nobody places any j A law was pas.sed at the last ses- confiden :e in persons who ate habit- ! slon o f the Legislature o f this Stat'', ually behind tim e. T h e y scarcely j em p owering land-owners to m ake succeed in any enterprise. T h e r e - j sidew.ilks and plant.^hade trees, along fore, for your own sake— as well as j the highways bonl.'ring tlietr [troper- for the sake of others— be punctu.d. ' THE FARM AND THE GARDEN. SomnaxnlbiiSisiiA. Perhaps the m o st interesting case on record is that of a young clergy­ m an, the narrative o f which is from the im m ediate com m u n ication of the Archliishop ot Bordeaux. T h e young ecclesiastic, w b n tl e prelate was at the sam e collo^ge, used to rise every night, and w rite out either sermons or pisces of m u sic. T o s tu ­ dy his condition, the bishop betook liim self several nights consecutively to the th a m b e r i f the young man, where he m a d e the fulluwing obser­ vations : T h is young clergym an n.sed to rise, lake paper, and begin to w iite. Before vvtiiing m u sic, he would take a s tick and rule the lines. He wrote the notes with th e cfirres- ponding words, both with the utm o st accuracy ; or when, by chance, he had wi'inen the words too wide, he altered them . A fter com p leting a sermon, he would read i t aloud, froin beginning to end. I f any passage displeased him , he erased it, and wrote the amcnd»-d passage correctly ovei th e other. On one occasion, in order * to - ascertain w h e ther he used' his eyes, the bishopJn ter posed a sheet of pasteboard belweei) liis face and the writing. T h e sleeper took not, the least notice, but went on w riting as before. T h e jim itaiions o f his perceptions to what he was thinking about were-very curious. A piece of auiseed’Cake, th a t he had sought lor, he ate approvingly;v-b*it w h en, on another occasiQUy a piece o f the'sam e cake was p u t into his m o u t h ,, he sjiat it out. l t *1s‘ to 'ho .observed ih ^ t he always •knew. avU.m h is ;pen had ink in it; and* i f they udnntly chanjfcd his paper when he waS w r it- lin^^’h^’knew it, d / the sheet eiths^i- ttited was of a flr&HrBnt.si^g frWjd'tfau iformer., and iu that case he appear­ ed emtorassetl But it the fresh Facts and Opinions. \We inieiid, as often as once a month, to give the readers of The Ledger a summary of the more important flicts and opiii- ty, and to erect a tailing to proti-ct the .‘•amu— the width of the walk lim ited to six feet, for a mail not over three rod.s wide, and one foot addi­ tional for every additiun d rod in the width o f the mad ; but the railing pro.ectitig them may he at a fan her dist ance, not exceed ­ ing thirty inches and is to hen- tm o re one bar height, with posts. 'I’tic Fadiiiij: Aint-r can varietas of tlis ions published in the leading ug r i c u ltu r a l and h o r t ic u l t u r a l pe- *'\*^■'‘■'7 «ro liuus-btori m S-e-linir, a fnut . T i Ti ,r e e ' ^ ^ ot ttuod qmiliiy red wiinn r pe. Kkin smoodi riOuieals. JMciuy 01 our ir.eiids un.i tjun. bt-afer.iscidom iniideW'*. biifh who have a farm or garden, are subscribers to some of these pe­ riodicals, but our summary will be made up from all the best sources of information., and will, we hope, prove to be every way valuable and acceptable. We begin with the following sum­ mary : A mistaken notion prevails with many^ iLat animals need lit­ tle or no light while confined in th.‘e stable. Fresh air and sun­ light are promotive of healthy and yet, in the construction of stables for.animals, many seem to forget tiiat these requisites are important. The horse is fond of fresh“air and light, and Ips stable should he provided witb the means of thorough ven­ tilation, and the admission of the sun’s rays; be enjoys these quite as much as bis ; master/ Tbe cow wintered in a warm, dry, well ventilated’stable,' properly fed and cared fpr,, wilf pay for all^extra trouble and labor in the inbreaSe'd (^uantity^ and. })oH.er qUBility of milk yielded tbrougb •the sniniaer f6l|bWiiig. ■ w.b fcear' .4#-jr^an <^niplaiping, Lbai tbe 'a n n u a l y i e l d o f c b e e s e per eow has fallen down to three <(>w, s-pr.'a'tinsy. \1 -u' tinn ing- 13 mi t'if“r anii A Vrtlii-ibF k ml It. w«)s iutm. ilncul I'j t(i« iSh»k‘-rsi;t New I.rf\baiion. N. Y. Fruit Imge ^^t{ i-jnoofh. ^k■B iitcif. r- aiely tl.Vn. fni r hmias 11; h»nthe.s .Hie to two II ches iH-linv the hrmietn'S. lu-ver jii ld-*wd, f-troi-fr, n m-lj’ i-prigtit \rowers It is (3 that all r. qiiireVl winter pro­ tection has heeii RivMi. If the grapevines ll:iv(* Ilet b-eil do wo -remove them from the ire!hre'<. aiitl cover the tender kuids. a t leset, »R,rtti. 'the p* rf ctij hardy fcosts will he more tuii'ful if tin ply laid upon the anmn i wohont coeiiii\ >hru it they are !• ft upon ttie tielhs atjd exposed u> the ac­ tion of tie colfl wiiid.^. -'re ttaf. Um<-overnar • f g>v.i) to la.'pb irie> is Dot washed aWiiy hy heavy mi ns Mam re. may be put Hiomul liie r- o’fi 111 't-iees the pround is not froz n. Mdke f lan.s for .new 1 lantings, and con,'-nit cii'iilognes. nnd f-end in oide>-3 to imr-eiynien as soi.n as the sel> ctiotl of vari­ eties i ' determined upon. The RhotFf'lanil Greening is one of the very bet-t <d‘ our winter eithi r lor cook­ ing or eating; it will thiise better upon low, moist land, than any o’hHr vaiiety Farm- er.-i, iF refore.-who wish to make tui st of ev- ^tything they ui del take, and wkos« orchard lands are not uiiderdrained will dp well to bear ihl.^ peculiarity ot tne gteenina In mind,.and when setting i-rees upon -uneven tend xeserve. flm lowest t-pots. at.d those whick are ibe- Inngest sa* orated wiiU moisture, fur the Rhode Island gxeniing. The rptodk 'of wool cow in store is small, and.p ei'e.is.yery little businiss dnisg, nor wiU'theie be before the mi.ddle orJa»t ot the ipotifh Manufacturers .and buyers are g«fa- eriilly busy.- a.a usual, ip.closing upi the buw- ness u( the- old y-ar lloidets aie genorally tfery sir, pg, and uble to carry their stocks,, ih view qf ih« great eBse in the mop*'? ntwr^ kpt 'ilieje isi.theietore, no p.rt!ap*ct of »• Xm\Wrn. ’unless there oe % fall io ex< hanjee. in wliicli case even tho relative pricetf wool and gold will doubtless be utMulaxaed. >*l 0 '- J. -A

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