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The evening gazette. (Port Jervis, N.Y.) 1869-1924, September 22, 1924, Image 2

Image and text provided by New York State Library

Persistent link: http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn83031647/1924-09-22/ed-1/seq-2/


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’n v o THE EWMNG GAZETTE rv._ PORT lERVIS^N. ii. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1924 r ■ > a '- - ■ T-.V. “There Is So Much More Room In This Glenwood Oven” \rt ^ ¥ 7 H E N baliing day comes round you’ll ff always appreciate tlie big roomy oven of a Glenwood rangCo Here’s the Model C,” for instance. Its oven is wide and deep with plenty ©f space to adjust the sliding rack at different heights. The comers are four­ square, allowing you the full width of the oven bottom for anything that needs to be baked very slowly and thoroughly. The indicator on the door tells you just how hot to keep your fire for cakes, pies, roasts and biscuits. May we show you this range, some day soon? iS I SI Model “C” For Coal or Wood Finished in pearl-gray porcelain enamel or in plaits hlack. To furnish plenty of hot v/ater we can equip this range with either a water front for arfean districts or a special reservoir for rural homes. IB \U i p y luM I m s m H Spare the Spare Tire J I« Alitiiltioliilt? tii’i'S :iro wriiiii»od X I, in jo ii e r liy tije iiuiunfacturer ? ^ fii-!. kru.w that ‘ sunikht and air .^ap llu* stmii;tti j* • of riihliar. It sliniild ]>e protnet- ^ . ed until it actually yocs on the i* • rim fur road sei*viee. X , Statistics prove that a tire T ^ good for an average of G,(iP0 $ miles when it leaves the fa c t o r y j ; will lose approximately 2,000 ? miles of life by being carried, X unprotected as a sjmre for one ? year. t A tire cover made of rubber- ? ized-coated fabric will outlast many tires. It will cost less tban the 2,000 lost mileage on one unprotected spare. K e a t ly covered tires look so much better hanging on the back of the machine than do bare tires. The covers are water­ proof and can be washed with­ out injury as often as the car is washed. They come in colors to match the body finish.—Mo- ' Life. S c e n e t a k e n d u r in g seco nd in t e r n a t io n a l polo g a m e '^ c WHICH WAS WON BY THE AMERICAN TEAM 14 TO 5 ' ' r - ‘ iSl»9 l i l i i i p 1 fU5W ■-'L'TOi-il ■ Whm0.^§Lolons A r e **Docked^* I»—-A^fttralla, where members of parliarae|i^* R eceive about $5,000 a year, Tfeg^^'mem are fined or ' / ‘docked’’ for “a^ences during a ses- «8J Oiffers from that counrty. Eng- Smerh^'^-^bere a member / 5 P l r b f f every now ^nd^\^^9 private af- it In itSiiFh^^^fi^mber of . efiff lfiMft 5 »o$ 2 i 0 OO a Q t h e t l y a t aj otfj BaDnalJs toM M w m oMafiaifuiQva m e m h n ^ d ^ m ^ d ^ I ^ m d O a r n d l c i m <!h^sifTiD3 Times Have Chas^ged ijj An advertisement appearing in ^S20, In the Columbian Sentinel. »tores.*«e8e*%!imdl»*l^oip!PflsB9ia9fi; ^ » s^mi-weekly newspaper of Boston, meat and as for the natives, they prV fthotes milk at 4i/6 cents a quart, but­ t e to receive food or clothing lor cents a pound and a whoU ^leir services. quarter of lam^ for 25 cents. Four a second British team on IIU' Meadow Brook, L. L, Hold. The I photo shows Tommy Hitchcock al- j mo.st falling out of his saddK^>aS‘ he leans over to hit the ball. \''_j Light Lights, When Lifted One of the most utilitarian night lights yet offered by the electrical manufacturers is one in the shape of a candlestick which when It is stand­ ing remains unlighted but immediate­ ly it is lifted the tiny bulb glows. It is a bedroom night light and works on a battery. Its own weight pushes the off button so that it remains ui> lighted when not in use. Plants Turning to Sun The fact that sunflowers and other plants turn toward the sun is due to a property called heliotropism. This constant turning is the direct result of the action of light In modifying the growing cells. Shakespeare as an Actor In the list of the priaWpal actors of Shakespeare’s plays, prefixed to the folio, the first collection of his plays, published In 1623. the name of the famous dramatist is placed first. He was an ac^or by profession, but the extent to which he played in his own productions is not clear. He Is said to have impersonated Adam In “As You Like It” and “the ghost” In “Hamlet” Avoid Prolixity Whatever advice ye give, be short. -Horace. ______ FOR SALE Two family house, fine location. Four family house, good investment proposition. W- D. McCOMBS, Agent f o h t jh r v t s , n . y . S U P E R -B K A 3 I A COMIhTGI A l I th e N e w T h eatre T h u r sday eve­ ning, Sept. 25, Sam H a r r is w ill p r e ­ sen t that tremendouslj'- su c c e s s f u l dram a of psychology “R a in ” w h ich h a s caused m o r e com m e n t in N e w Y o r k city th a n an y play ever produc­ ed on B r o a d w a y . “R a in ” it w i l l be rem e m b e r e d first appeared a s a short sto r y by W . Som e rset A laughazi in the m a g a z in e “Sm art S e t” b u t a l ­ th o u g h A laughan is a playw r ight h im ­ se lf he is n o t the one th a t prepared it for sta g e purposes. This w a s done, by heretofore unknown dram a tists, John C o lton and C lem e n c e R a n d o lp h w h o sa w p o s s ib ilities in it th a t w e r e overlook e d by the origin a l au th o r and secu r e d h is consent for them to try th e ir hand on m a k in g | “Aliss T h o m p ­ son into a play. ,^The result w a s that \R a in” as it w a s then renam ed b e ­ cam e a great success. The scen e of this dram a w a s laid at the P o r t of P a g o P a g o — t h is p a r t i c i i - [ ]ur loca.tion is m o st unique, b e in g the j c r a t e r of a subm e r g e d volcan o , en- traiice to it by ship b e in g very diffi­ cult and on ly accessib le to p ilots w h o p o s s e s s the utm o st fa m ilia r it y w i t h the reefs and other obstructions in th e harbor. T h e principal ch a r a c ters are Sadie T h o m p son, a girl of easy m orals and the R e v . A lfred D a v idson, a m ission ­ ary w h o has been there before and has returned on the sam e ship that brought .Sadie to th e islan d . H e is an uncom p r o m isin g zealot and h is pen­ ch a n t fo r reg u la t in g everything in h is diocese b r in g s him into con f lict w ith the girl, Sadie, w ith the resu lt that a co m p lica tio n <aris^ dhalj ev e n tu a lly cau s e s th e su icid e o f th e preacher. T h ere is a big problem in the play, which althou g h it is not solved, cer­ tainly causes everyon e w h o sees it to think, and th a t is all th a t an y serm on, lecture or d r a m a can do. Sam H . H a r r is , the producer of the p lay in N e w Y o r k is sponsor fo r it w h en it w ill be seen a t th e N e w T h e a ­ tre and promises^ an excellen t cast an d a superb scen ic production. L E G A L ]^^U1TCE Board Public ominou- >ard of i''ommfssioner.s, ‘minds and ftuiklings, woiiltl) of IVuinsyh’tiiiia, tiiid Now Am*k State Departm ent of Public Works, ijiireau of Higlnvays, Albany, N. Y. N t TTCE TO CO N T R A C T O R ? — l\’ui‘suani' to the act of the A ssem b ly of tli(' C o m m o n w e a lth of P e n n s y lvan ia approved Ju ly 2o, 1917, and am ended in the year 1819, an d Chapter 50 6 of the Law‘s of New’’ Y o r k State in th e yea r 1916, am endm e n ts th e r e to, and C h a p ter S67 of the L a w s of 1923 New Y'ork .?tate. sea led prop o s a ls w ill be recei'T d by the un d e r s ign e d at No. 5 5 L a n c a s t e r Street, A lbany, N . T ., u n t il one o ’clock p. m. ad v a n c e d 'stan d ­ ard tim e , wdiich is tw e lv e o’clock neon eastern standard tim e , on T U E S D A Y , Septem b e r 2 3, 1924, for tlie con s tru c ­ tion of a n e w wmod b lock pavem ent to the P o r t Je-rvis-M a tam o r a s Interstate P>ridge over th e D e law a r e river, and repairs to the sam e . The principal item s o f w o r k -will consist_of ap p. p r o x ­ im ately a , : 5S AL F t . B. AI. Tim ber and ler; 22 Of-O lbs. Structural Steel; mb' 1.302',Sq. Y'd.s. W o o d B ibck P a v e m e n r . T’lans. specilication.s, estim a t e of ist, and proposal fo r m s m a y be ob- b-K-Hl a t the office Burea .Super! Build ings, 1 o f Hig’hwnays, A lbany, N. Y., _ o f Sam u e l B. Rambo; D e p u ty rin t e n d e n t , P u b l i c G r o u n d s a n d ling s, S ta t e C a p itol,' H a rrisb m -g , Ba., a n d a t tho re s id e n c e of G eoi'ge J . K a lm h a e h . C a r e t a k e r o f th e P o r t J e r - v is-N I a tam o r a s B rid g e . 4 3 B a rcelo w S treet, I ’ovt .Jervis, N. Y. ATTEiSrTTO>v’ Oir B I D D E R S is ca ll­ ed to ‘‘G eneral In f o r m a t io n fo r B id­ ders” in the p r o p o s a l. P r o p o s a ls in ist be .submitted in .separate sealed en - velon e s wuth n a m e of contract p la in ­ ly endorsed on the ou tsid e of the en - t'elope. E a c h proposal m u s t be a c - inied by cash, d r a f t or certified : p.ayable to th e order of the N e w Y ork State D e p a r tm e n t o f P u b ­ lic W o i’ks, B u r e a u of H igh w a y s , fo r th r e e p e r lo.i, draft or certified check to be ade in accord a n c e wnth the e N e w York .State H igh w a y Law . be ■ ■ rompan an am o u n t equal to a,t least i th The approv.aal The B U R E A U OF H IG H W A Y S . A. W . BR A N D T . METRO-GOLDWN CORPORATION —presents-^- \SLAVE of desire :^ Adapted from the immortal story m e Magic Skin^^ by Balzac —WITH— GEORGE WALSH BESSIE LOVE CARMEL MYERS Revelry Enthroned in Gay, Glittering Paris! —A young poet maddened by sudden fortune. —^A pleasure loving countess. — ^The evil curse of a magic tailsman. —^The^v revelries of Paris night life. —^Romance and intrigue. —^Balzac’s immortal story brought to the screen in splendor, Two-Reel Christie Comedy ‘^A PERFECT 36^^ Aesop Film Fable ^^FLYING FEVEr^ Matinee 2 :30 Admission 25c Evening 8 : 0 0 ' a sta t e o f N e w Y o r k and the C o m m o n - w'ealth c f P e n n s y lvania. The aw a r d of the con tract to be con tin g e n t up o n .'. o f the game by both state.s. e rig h t is reserved to reject an y or all bids. ■> K

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