OCR Interpretation


Penn Yan express. (Penn Yan, N.Y.) 1866-1926, November 29, 1923, Image 3

Image and text provided by Yates County History Center & Museums

Persistent link: http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn83031516/1923-11-29/ed-1/seq-3/


Thumbnail for 3
'I THE PENN VAN EXPRESS. PENN VAN. N. Y., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1923. Three Findin’s— Keepin’s DISCLAIMER Now and then will appear in this paper a column under the above caption. The editors disclaim all re­ sponsibility for the copy, agree­ ing to accept from the column­ ist, observations and excerpts from the press at large, with­ out editing, whether it be good, bad or indifferent. It is hoped that the public may find something of interest and enjoyment in the column, and it will be continued just so long as the editors are un­ able to sell the space to adver­ tisers for a more remunerative return. well as become acquainted with Bru­ tus, Cassius, and rest. A multitude of reliable companions await one in a good library, companions who can­ not talk behind one’s back, or effect one’s material happiness or welfare. These, then, are the kind of com­ panions that one finds in books—the wisest, the noblest, and the most trust-worthy of men. Board of Supervisors “Who’s that guy you were talking so nice to?” “Aw, that’s my old family druggist, Rapolli-” “What did he say?” “No!” London, Nov. 18— The scientists of the Natural History Department of the British Museum are delighted at remarkable bequest from the late Nathaniel Rothschild in the form of the largest and most complete col­ lection of fleas in the world.—N. 1. Times. Can you imagine anybody but a dog making such a collection. Do you remember, Pete, the fine assortment you brought home one time from Pittsburgh? Did you don­ ate them to the Penn Yan Library? COUNTY CLERK The report of the County Clerk shows: Rec’d from searches, certi­ ficates, etc .................. . $ 941.02 Fees from recording docu­ ments, etc ............................. 1,395.62 Official servcies.................. 216-5! The mortgage tax report shows re­ ceipts from: Recording mortgages, etc .. $4,177.57 Allowance for State Tax Com­ missions, books and serv­ ices ..................................... 126.70 SUPERINTENDENT OF POOR At the close of the fiscal year. Oc­ tober 1st, 1922, the number of inmates were 32; received during year, 18; to­ tal 50. During the year 1922-23 there have been 15 discharged, two (2) ab­ sconded and seven (7) died, leaving on hand October 1st, 1923, 26. Whole number of weeks’ board 1,540. Aver­ age cost per week per person, $4.35, to be charged back to the county and towns as follows: To County .- ....................... $ 819-04 To Barrington ......................... 221.22 To Benton ............................ 245.46 To Italy . ............................... 881.85 To Jerusalem ..................... 290.82 Milo ................................. 2,964.83 • • 1 o property ........................................ 1 Grand larceny .................. 1 Grand larceny, third degree . . . . 1 Intoxication .................................... 25 Indecent exposure of person .......... 1 Operating motor vehicle while intoxicated .................................... 1 Operating motor vehicle in reck­ less manner ................................ 2 Operating motor vehicle without license ........................................... 2 Petit larceny .................................... 3 Rape, first degree ......................... 1 Attempted rape ................................ 1 Vagrancy ............................................ 1 Violation Sec. 480 of Penal Code Violation Sec- 482 of Penal Code Violation Sec. 43 of the Penal Code 1 Violation of Motor Vehicle Law 1 Violation of Sec. 287 Motor Vehicle Law ............................................... 1 50 In adidtion to the above commit ments there were ninety-nine lodgeis admitted from November 1, 1922, to October 31, 1923. The total number of meals for the year, including the Sheriff’s family, 7,779—370 3-7 weeks at $4.99 per week. The number of prisoners and lodg­ ers chargeable to the Village of Penn Yan for the year is ninety. They had one hundred and thirty- eight meals—six and four-sevenths weeks, at $4.99 per week- Dated, Penn Yan, N. Y., November 1, 1923. The Kind He Played “Doc takes golf seriously, doesn’t he?” “Yes; if he had a sense of humor, he’d stop playing.” —LIFE. To To Potter ................ To Starkey................ To Torrey ............... Amount paid for penses: Repairs to buildings Light ......................... ........ 34.80 .......... 54872 ........ 570.47 almshouse ex- ♦ • ... $1,014.57 445.80 H e a t ......................................... 1,119.19 Farm tools and equipment . 1,183,38 Farm stock ........................... 300.00 The local papers recently featured a boast made by the local School Board that we had the lowest tax rate in thirty-two towns. Surely one cannot regard this in the light of an achievement to be heralded. What better heritage for our youth than learning, and quality should oe paramount? • • Almshouse inmates: Almshouse employees Food supplies ................... C loth in g .............. . ............... Physicians and medicines , Farm Supt. and farm labor Farm stock maintenance . Seeds and fertilizer ........ Postage and telephone Outside relief: • • • • $4,963.03 $ 932 50 2,404.69 287.48 363.28 1,968.49 1,247.10 468 04 9.00 STATE TAX Barrington ............................. $1907.92 Benton .................................... 5165.-13 Italy ........................................ 1046.01 Jerusalem ............................. 50S2.32 Middlesex . ........ 2101.06 Milo ........................................ 12497.36 Potter . . . .............................. 2494.93 Starkey .........................* . , . 5136.42 Torrey .................................... 2657.5o ARMORY TAX Barrington .............................. $205.37 Fenton .................................... 56-1.14 Italy .......................................... 114.24 lerusalem ................................ 555.06 M iddlesex ................................ 229.46 Milo .......................................... 1,364.90 P o tter ........................................ 274.48 Starkey .................................... 560.^7 Torrey ...................................... 290.25 STENOGRAPHER’S and CLERK S TAX Parrington ................................ $ 50.17 Benton ...................................... 122.03 Italy .......................................... 34.58 Jerusalem ................... 11S.81 Middlesex .................. o7.i7 i i • ft • « * • • • ■ n 4 ' • ft • V ■ • ft • 0 «. • • ♦ • > . * • r * i ■m *'• ■‘V 1 • i, »' i i • »*V V «!’• •• • v -> • * « Give us the best, rather than the cheapest, in education. The taxpay­ ers never complain when they see their money wisely spent. Someone told us the other day i;bout a farmer up near Potter Centex who had his tin roof blown off, and he rolled it into a compact bundle, wired it up carefully with baling wire and sent it down to Merrill A. Beach. Shortly after he received a com ­ munication reading: “ It will cost you $48-75 to have your car repaired. For heaven’s sake, tell us what hit you.” Whether you fancy Ma Jung, Mah Jong, Ma Chongg or a thousand and Dne other titles for the game that is fascinating the fickle public, you will lave to play it or be a wall flower. It will reign supreme as a pastime lor the nonce ,and then, as the former iditor of the EXPRESS was wont to say on occasions, it will pass into in­ nocuous desuetude”, like Ping Pong md Tiddledy Winks. If you ask us, we would describe t as a game of Rummy played with funny dominoes. Yes, you will play it and learn all he rules, the counts and the phrases. The Chinese will make fortunes if he Chicago packers, can furnish snough shin-bones to make the ivory aces for the tiles. When you are mildly conversant vith the game, you will give the ►ox of tricks to the kids to build oy houses and go back to Auction fridge, a game that exercises the ►rain- “Aint it hell, keeping up with Liz- ie?\ F o o d ..................................... Rents and clothing ........ Fuel ................................... Transportation of paupers Physicians and medicine . Sundry ....................... ......... Burials ................... - ............ Overseer of P o o r .............. Lunacy examination ........ Farm products sold: R y e ....................................... Horse ................................... Cream ................................. Hogs ................................... Cattle ................................... Hay and S t r a w .................. Beans ................................... G rapes ................................. • • $ $8,143.32 $1,867.81 210.41 109.40 125.88 475.42 2,730.25 476-13 3.00 20.00 359.53 150.00 33.00 80.00 85.00 165-00 354.97 699.73 T h in k T h is O v e r Isn’t it reasonable to suppose that the largest battery m aker can pro­ duce and sell better bat­ teries at a lower figure than any other m aker? W illard Batteries 134 car These $2,036.70 Stock now on hand; Horses, 6; Cows 9; Heifers, 5; Calves, 3; fat Hogs, 4; Shoats, 15; Pigs, 9; Brood Sows, 2, Hens, 75. SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES William D. Reed, County Sealer of Weights and Measures, in his report shows that he has examined 4,795 pieces of weights an measures and inspected 65 loads of wood; 78 loads of coal; two (2) of grain; four (4) of SHERIFF’S REPORT The number of prisoners commit­ ted to the jail for the year is as fol­ lows: (No females were admitted un­ der any of the charges) Total Assault, first d e g r e e ............................1 Burglary, third degree, and grand larceny, first degree .................. 1 Burglary, third degree, and grand larceny, second degree .............. 1 Destruction of property ................. 1 Disposing of chattel mortgaged A certain real estate man in Penn fan was keenly worried over a deal, md when his wife asked him foi ►articulars, he said that he had hings fixed up to sell another man i farm, a vacant lot and an old rame building, continuing with, “ The mrchases assumes a $16,00 mort­ gage, and I take over a second moit- [age on the farm.” His wife inquired, “ Yes, yes, but vhere is the hitch in the transac­ tor!?” . “Well, to be frank with you,” re­ died the real estate man, “ I want o get $4 in cash.” We leave it to you to guess wh-> he real estate operator was. the choice m anufacturers, m en know batteries and their knowledge is based on tests and facts. Their experience should be of value to you. C. J. FRENCH 116 Elm Street Phone, 248 - J T r* STORAGE BATTERIES The Companionship of Books iy Lawrence Stuckey, El Paso, Texas Books are oftimes better compan- ons than men. The friends whom ne makes in books are greater and nore enduring in the long run, than he friends whom one meets in the veryday walks of life. What com- lanion, for instance, would one ex- hange for the genuine sympathy and riendship that one feels, let us haz- rd, for Hamlet, Pickwick, of Jean raljean? What average companion, nay I ask, could one find more in- eresting than Thomas DeQuincey, or larcus Aurelius? By means o f books, norever, one may become acquainted /ith the great statesmen of the past, nd look into their minds as one rould look into the works of a clock, ndeed, the companionship that books ffer is the best that the world af- ords—not only in the present, but f the past* One can go fishing with saak Walton, and roam through ield, meadow and wood with Words­ worth. One can climb to great in- ellectual heights with the aid of com- anions like Kant, Hobbes, Rousseau ndHume. Moreover, if one must feel, ne can look into the hearts o f sup- rwomen and supermen like Rosalind nd Macbeth. One can hate, if one ishes, with Othello, and love with lomeo. One can soar to Olympian eights with Homer; laugh with Aris- )phanes; enter, with Plutarch, the Drum of the past, and behold, as T h e L o w C o s t o f U s ing L o n g D istan c e O N G D I S T A N C E saves much time, effort and money that some people naturally assume that rates for the service are high. But are they ? One of our subscribers recently sent his voice to eleven different people in eleven different towns from 8 to 225 miles away at a cost averaging 76 cents a call, covered nearly 1000 miles and he trans­ acted business with 33 minutes. these people H o w else could you accomplish such re­ markable results such low cost ? such little time at l USE T H E OLD MARSHALL’S R a tes fo r m a n y L o n g D istan c e calling points are listed in your telephone directory. Consult this list. It w ill pay you. r - * New York Telephone Company '•I i i S>M i M •t ell Druggists, or sent prepaid by W illiams mfq . G o , C leveland , o , M ilo ........................................... 291.11 P o tter........................................ 67.9 j Stancey .................................... 143.8? Torrey ...................................... 6,1.81 Highways at $50 per mile charged lo towns for maintenance Barrington .................................. $400.0** Benton .................................... 450.00 Italy ......................................... 200.Ou Jerusalem ................................ 30u.0t> Middlesex ................................ 400.U0 M ilo ........................................... 300.00 P o tter ....................................... 200.06 Starkey .................................... 200.00 Torrey ...................................... 150.V9 Almshouse for support of Poor Farrington .............................. $*,<.1.22 Benton ....................... 245.46 Italy . ....................................... 881.85 Jerusalem ................................ 2J0.S2 Middlesex .............................................. Milo ......................................... 2964.83 P o tter........................................ 3*.80 Starkey ............. . .................... 548 73 Torrey .................................... 570.47 ------------------------------ -------------------------------------- Don’t Miss the Miracle handicapped. Its outlook on life is circumscribed. Why should the neigh­ bors enjoy all the happiness and fun? The reality is here—Radio n^s reached a state of perfection that is marvelous. And the first cost is so moderate that no home can afford to be without it. No intricate machinery—a hand­ some cabinet—an attractive piece of furniture for the living room. Buy any one of them that is made by a reliable manufacturer. Only, get a radio receiving set and join the great and ever-growing invisible au­ dience that is enjoying the greatest miracle of modern science. The great things of the world are often the simplest. Radio is one ol them. We have them in stock; also install them, all ready for you to use. C. B. SPRAGUE 141 Jacob Penn Yan, N. Y. □□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□a a □ D D D n □ D a a e D D a D D D D D D W h en You W ant Foot Comfort And Better Wearing Shoes at popular Prices, we have them. V WOMAN ILL of Radio Don’t Miss the Miracle of Radio Over one million homes in the United States are already equipped with ladio receiving sets. There are seve al hundred broadcasting stations fil­ ling the air with this modern miracle! One result is that the great body o£ American people are daily becoming better informed than any othei people on earth. Why not, when just by turning a dial on the compact and beautiful cabinet in the living- room, they can hear the best music the world has to offer; lectures on a wide variety of subjects by notable leaders of thought; high-class enter­ tainment from the theatres and con­ cert halls; speeches by statesmen; the trend of finance; up-to-the-minute re­ ports on the world’s markets—the lat­ est news in the field of sport? The strides make toward the high­ est aspirations of the radio engineer * within the past few years have been i arvelous. Practice and theory have worked side by side to make rauio receiving a universal boon, widening the outlook and enlarging the hori­ zons o f all who are willing to enjoy it. For radio receiving is wonderful! Practical perfection is here. The air is filled with things of value which, if you have a radio set, you are privi­ leged to garner and bring into your home without a radio receiving set id ily and friends. And it is all prac­ tically free! With radio so perfect that it * bringing delight and information -and education to a million families, the home without a rado receiving set is COULD NOT WORK Gamed Strength, Weight and Now Doing Own Work, by Taking Lydia E. Pinkham’s Vegetable Compound Marion, Ind.—“I was all run-down, nervous and bent over. I could hardly d r a g around, let alone do my work. I read some letters in the papers telling what Lydia E. Pink- ham's V e g e t a b l e Compound had done for others and I thought I would try it. Then a man told my husband about his wife and what good it had done her and wanted him to have me try it. I took one bottle and could see what it did for me in a week’s time, and when I had taken three bottles I had gained both in strength and weight and was doing my own work. I took it before my last baby was born and it helped me so much. I sure am glad to recommend the Vegetable Compound to any woman who suffers from female ail­ ments, for I know by experience what it can do. I have used Lydia E. Pink- ham's Sanative Wash, also the Liver Pills, too, and think them fine.\—Mrs. W m . E ldridge , 620 E. Grant Street, Marion, Indiana. A record of nearly fifty years service should convince you of the merit of Lydia E. Pinkham’s Compound. □ D a D D D a a D n a a a D D D D D D Guaranteed All Leather Shoes . RED GOOSE SHOE STORE Elm wood Theatre Building PENN YAN, N. Y. a □ D a a D D a D o D a D D □ o D □ D D DnDDnDDDDDnannDDaDDanDnDDDDDDDDnnDDDDDDDDDDDaDDDnaDDcP o: o <3 We Want Your BEANS J H AY / AN D GRAIN See Us The final Touch That Makes Christmas Complete In planning your lists do not overlook PHOTOGRAPHS. Can you think of any other gift that would be as desir­ able ? Make an appointment early at THE BURNELL STUDIO a □ a D D □ □ □ a D □ D D D □ D □ n D D □ D Steam Pressing Dry Cleaning a Q LET US REDYE THAT FADED WINTER OVERCOAT i The Result W ill Please You. Penn Yon Dry Cleaners a G& i Before You Sell LAKE KEUKA FRUIT SALES Phone 247 R. Dyeing ALFRED B. JENSEN 107 Main St. Over Reilly's Music Shoppe Pleating B m, q E 0. a Q □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ 0 0 0 ® V COMPANY i W A N T E l B E A N S and P O T A T O E S i i We are offering the following prices for BEANS I i I I Peas and Mediums, W h ite Marrows, - Yellow Eyes, - Red Kidneys, W h ite Kidneys, $ 4 .5 0 8.00 5 .5 0 6 .2 5 7 .0 0 We are Always in the Market for — 1 e* e- i o H A N D STRA W f i »• • C. E. C A M P B E L L Masonic Temple Building, Penn Yan, N. Y. I Represented in Dundee and Watkins by JOHN CLARK. I YJ/ ys * 7. .»/ z G u a r d i n g D e l i c a t e F o o d s H I L E many housewives may think the hardier foodstuffs need less pro­ tection during Fall and Winter B GIFTS the B B B M rist a M ilk, custards, winter vegetables need ic e protection and whole a B The W ISE Christmas Shopper will buy He meats year ’round. That certainly does not lend itself to argument. For the sake of these delicate foods, alone, it will pay you well to take ice regularly. Any family physician will confirm the fact. W h y not direct— today— that our driver call? You’ll find ice decidedly economical in use these cooler days. And our year ’round service is always at your ’phone’s end. KEUKA LAKE ICE CO., PENN YAN, N. Y. i MEMBER NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF ICE INDUSTRIES B now because he can shop leisurely, will buy Autom obile Accessories because they will be welcome. And he will buy them from CLUMM because he knows CLUM M will stand back of them. Here are a few Christmas sno^estions. S s ■ This Emblem W a shington S tr e e t, Chicago D tb e n l Your Protection 1U B Motometers Bumpers Stop Signals W eed Chains Ash Trays Tire Covers Wind Deflectors Windshield Cleaners i Step Plates Spot Lights Cigar Lighters Fisk Tires s B Vases for Enclosed Cars EVERYTHING FOR THE AUT01ST 5 5 B • * MERRILL CLUMM 1 4 3 Jacob St. Phone 5 0 9 s ■ n i a i i i n n X • , v t

xml | txt