OCR Interpretation


Penn Yan express. (Penn Yan, N.Y.) 1866-1926, November 29, 1923, Image 2

Image and text provided by Yates County History Center & Museums

Persistent link: http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn83031516/1923-11-29/ed-1/seq-2/


Thumbnail for 2
-A Page Two THE PENN YAN EXPRESS, PENN YAN 29 I The Penn Yan Express Entered at the Post Office at Penn Yan, N. Y„ Second-Class Mail Matter. Subscription Price, $1.50 in Advance THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1923 sjdy 0r guaranteed price will help. ience that legislation will not cor rect economic or personal defici­ encies. Growing wheat alone year after year means worn-out lands and hard- up farmers, and no government sub Published By THE PRINT CRAFT SHOP Incorporated Masonic Temple, Jacob Street, Penn Yan, N. Y., every Thursday. One man in ten who goes into the grocery business succeeds and grows wealthy, and the average is about the same with farmers. Farming is the basic industry and if we could destroy every city, the wealth production and necessities of the farms would build them again. But if we destroy the farms, the cities would fall into irretrievable ruin. To guarantee wheat prices is to tax weaker industries than farm ing. The world excess of 300,000,000 bu- He doesn't seem to have much time shels of wheat would be doubled by to attend to other people’s affairs. Just a subsidy as a premium on increased busy every minute, attending to his production and wheat would go down own daily hustle* Rather a likable as taxes went up. The Man W ho Minds His Own Business Did you ever stop to think about the man who minds his own business? He is a very busy man isn’t he? sort or chap, don’t you think? -day doing some kind of work. that we don’t mean that he is runninv .-around telling you what you ought The way out is not by more legis- In the first place, he has a busi lation but more faith in our country, ness. That means that he is eve^y more common sense and more diver­ sified farming. to do, or what not to do, or hov | P f C S S G l V C S tfa C F a C t S much you ought to give here, or how much you ought to give there, he's just giving. He doesn’t give all he makes to charity, neither is he what The country weekly and small city daily give the people the facts. The institution of the freedom of the world calls “stingy”, but he does the press is so firmly entrenched in his work, day by day, whether it bt- this country that any attempt to ;ur- tail it instantly arouses public e-r sentment. as a job for wages, or whether he receives a salary or whether he own-.; a business and gives employment to others. He doesn’t make a practice of helv trammeled press. ing lazy people or criminals, but he is human and approachable. He is People demand facts; facts can be given only through a free and un- No better recognition of this can be found than in the fact that, when hind and considerate, not only in hit* a dictator arises in any part of the contact with the daily wosld, but at world, his first action is to muzzle the press. . No dictator can progress without home, with his family, wife, his child­ ren. He is courteous with those wit'i whom he daily comes in contact, and the aid of censorship of the press he is big enough to pass over ihe’ and of news dispatches, small vexations of life, with a smil and a shrug of the shoulders, fails to return insult for insult, nrd when something unpleasant happens he refuses to whine* Ex-Service Training He has some strong convictions, but he does not try to force them upon others. He is open minded and willing to listen to whatever the othex- fellow has to say. But in the end he follows his own judgment, ar-u cheerfully assumes the responsibility for what he does.If he is in the wrono* he acknowledges it. He is not a * par­ ser of the buck.” Being self-reliant and being faiily successful in his line of endeavor he is envied by the shiftless and by nis inferiors, by those whose chief aim in life is to envy others. He has a sense of humor, which attribute helps him to emerge from many a disagreeable situation. He even has enough humor to smile at his own shortcomings* Have you? . He has friends— true ones— because he does not try to use them. He is just an ordinary individual. You meet him every day, but, perhaps he is so unobtrusive that you fall to recognize his merits. He bothers no his bills and raises his one. Pays family, if he has one, and— mind's his own business. His funeral won't be nationally heralded, but no one will express relief that he is dead. In plain words, he has managed to make his own way in the world and i * so ding he has tried to keep out ot other people’s way. Do you kno.: him? W atch That Match and Smoke It will probably surprise a great many people to learn that careless ness with matches and smoking ma­ terials today constitutes the greatest single cause of fire loss in the United States, yet the carefully complied statistics of the National Board of Fire Underwriters show this to be true. Washington— One of the most im­ portant activities of the Veterans’ bur­ eau is that of rehabilitation, and to­ day the bureau is the leading ex­ ponent of vocational training in the world. The termination of the recent World war left a serious problem for our government to solve. Thousands of soldiers, who before the war were capable for caring for themselves, were left incapacitated. The task of rehabilitating these disabled men was assigned to the Veterans’ bureau. The bureau has made use of the best educational facilities available in very section of the country and in addition has estblished schools and training facilities of its own. The bureau conceives its task to be one of fitting a certain specific disabled ex-service man for a specific employ­ ment objective. It determines how much and what knowledge the dis­ abled man already has. It then pro­ vides the man with the additional information and skill thrdugh train­ ing. The bureau provides such training facilities as will most fully meet the requirements of the disabled man and this may include training at state universities, colleges of high stand­ ing, technical institutions, the better trade schools and commerical col­ leges, training in productive estab­ lishments, agricultural project train­ ing. or, if necessary, individual in­ struction. To September 1, 1923, 665,897 for­ mer service men had applied for vo­ cational training. Of this number 327,842 were found eligible for train­ ing. Of these, 169,222 have entered training. Of these, 73,276 are under­ going training, and 46,756 have com­ pleted training and have been re­ habilitated. Statistics accurate to September 1, 1923, show that of the 73,276 ex-ser­ vice men undergoing training, 33,- 258 are in schools and colleges, 35,- 671 are in placement training, and 4,- 347 are in Veterans’ bureau vocation­ al schools. Approximate statistics, as of Sep­ tember 1, 1923, show that 16,477 are pursuing business courses, 10,664 ag­ ricultural courses, 13,739, professional courses, 30,876, trades and industries, and 1,518, fundamental courses. The bureau is operating resident “ It is the custom of the National I schools at Evergreen, Md„ Fascagonia, . Miss., San Antonio, Tex., Pocono \ Pines, Pa., Bellevue, Nebr., Chilli- mne, unc^r tne ciassmcauon of L othe; Ohio, Chick Springs, S. C., ‘ Matches-Smoking’ fires due to either £ ast Norfolk, Mass, and Federal o f these hoards,’* say a w . E. M alia -Park, Md. lieu, General Manager of the organ- To care for the rapidly growing ization, “because so many of the number of rehabilitated men seeking . * jr j . i . ♦ places, the bureau established an em- match fires are due to burning luci-1 £ loym’ent service. The government Board of Fire Underwriters to undor the classification fers thrown away smokers. by thoughtless | Ieeis it a part of its task to render every aid in providing the trainee with a job or position that will en­ able him to support himself and his dependents. , Very positive progress has been *nan the toll exacted Ly any other mac{e jn the employment phase of the hazard, despite the fact that the rehabilitation work, especially dur- damages from Matches’ Smoking ’are ing the past six months. On March “The destruction of property from this cause now amounts to nearly $26,000,000 a year, which is far more so largely preventable. « The remedy lies in educating the 1, 1923, with 19,884 cases referred to the employments service for action, there were l, 2 w listed as “not em- Common Sensed i Radical farmers in North Dakota and Minnesota have found by exper- poople to a greater degree of care- ployed”. On September 1, after a fulness in handling lighted matches total of 33*11-1 cases had been refer- < ’ gars, cigarettes and p;pes, and, to ^ ryice, there were but 1 ,- their credit it may be said that Kvo | ployment\. It must be noted that in not employed” class are in- the country and two of the principal v/iatch producers, aie endeavoring to change the habits of their careless customers by imprinting suitable pre­ cautions upon cigarette and match boxes.” In course of time, the effect of these appeals to the public should became visible; otherwise it is fairly safe to predict that public sentime ic will bring about further enactment of personal liability laws providing for civil punishment of persons guilty of causing fire destruction by their obvious carelessness. A life sentence has just been given to a Mexican at Sacamento, Califor­ nia, who set fire to a school gno burned 10 Japanese children to de-ith. eluded those who “can not be cated,” those who “do not desire em­ ployment” and those who are sick or deferring employment. It is interesting to note that the em­ ployment service maintains a “follow­ up\ system whereby a man is not listed as employed until he has shown for a period of four months that he is able to fill a position. The figures tor employment are therefore bona fide figures and not the num­ ber of men for whom jobs have been found. More than. 33,000 rehabilitated vet­ erans have / gone into employment within the last two years, .statis­ tical figures made of an “unpicked” 20,000 of these show that they are earning more than they earned be­ fore the war and before they re­ ceived their disabilities or handicaps from service in the military forces of their country. It is estimated that 13,359 veterans will be rehabilitated and provided with jobs during the months' of Sep­ tember, October, November and De­ cember of this year. .. i K \ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ a Education ____ i Let Every American, every lover of liberty, every well-wisher to his posterity swear by the blood of the Revolution never to = violate in the least particular the laws of the country, and never to tolerate their violation by others. As the patriots of ’76 did to the support of the Declaration of Independence, so to the support of the Constitution and the laws, let every American pledge his life, his property, and his sacred honor; let every man remember that to violate the law is to trample upon the blood of his fathers and to tear the charter of his own and his children’s liberty. Let reverence for the laws be breathed by every Amer- = ican mother to the lisping babe that prattles on her lap. Let it be taught in schools, in seminaries, and in colleges, written Let it be primers, spelling books, and almanacs. Let preached from the pulpit, proclaimed in legislative halls, and en­ forced in courts of justice. In short, let it become the political religion of the Nation.— Abraham Lincoln. □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ v ■/ Used Buick 6 Coupe Newly Painted New Cord Tires Motor thoroughly rebuilt very fine car cheap m m Used Studebaker—Special- Touring Run very little and in fine condition— guaranteed to give good service. Buick- 6 --Touring , Excellent running condition All new tires paintgood A» good car at a bargain Buick- 6 -Sedan Good roomy family c«*r newly painted and overhauled s good cai, priced very low' Dodge Touring Good paint new tires fine running condition « priced very low ; W e have several good used cars not listed above at very reasonable prices. JOHN J. McELUGOH PENN YAN We Guarantee Our Used Cars \ □ tStaDD^BDDttllBDnBBODMOO BELONGED TO OUR Record Exchange Your Phonograph Would Become Popular Again It Would Mean That You Would Be Playing Econom y in Produc­ tion 10 or Records (Issued Every Month) For What You Now Paying For RECORD ONLY Think Over T H E SMOKE SHO 22 Main St., Penn Yan, N. Y. tsraCTflBCinflBDi One way to make more money m dairying is through economy in pro­ duction, it may be as important a way as through increased returns for the product sold. This is the opinion of many men who are closely in touen with the dairy situation in New York . state. It was pointed out at the state ag­ ricultural college at Ithaca this wee : that during the last quarter ox a century there has been a notable in­ crease in the production of corn sil- eage and legume hay in this state. The college believes that this i& a most encouraging sign, as these es­ sential roughages furnish the basis •or the most economical rations lo y New York. The growing of grain mixtures for □ feeding, such as: oats and peas, vx oats, peas and barley is also said to make for economy in production. Careful tests have shown that the yield per acre is increased when these mixtures are sown, over the yields when only a single grain is grown by itself. The dairy farmer who can grow small grain mixtures containing Canada field peas ,and who also has alfalfa and corn silage, finds right on his own farm nearly all the nutrients necessary for a good dairy ration. The study of one farm where this practice was followed showed that the in building up his ration this dairy­ man had to use only one pound of purchased feed, in the form of oil meal, to meet the standard require­ ments for maintenance and the pro­ duction of forty pounds of 4 per cent milk. Quality COFFEES * Our DeLux Brand Coffees offers another opportunity, save on your Coffee. Wefe'! that this price reduction ; worth your consideration * This brand Coffee posses^ a delicate pungency yet a 6 „ rich flavor which is especial] u pleasing to many of our cJf tomers. Price 3 3 c. lb. South Dakota has discovered that balanced agriculture means mo»*e than carrying your eggs all in one basket; it means having something to carry in addition to eggs. Every boy and girl who is a mem- OQDDDQDQDDDDDDDDDDBD ber of the purebred sheep club of Horn, Wyoming, sleeps under a blanket made of wool from his 01 her own sheep. TEAS Our Regular Japan Tea, the best we can find for customers. This particular brand |s carefully graded and selected! and is truly a quality of rich flavor and will be found a most wholesome and satis.i fying drink. COME AND GET SAMPLE i A. MAC KAY Lemons should be kept in water* til they are wanted for use and if skin will not only be kept from W dening but their flavor will be H proved. ICO DCJBBaaBEnDaBnnBBnDmBDDEEnnEBonBBnDBBnnBBDDBBDDaBnDBBDDeBaDicicii ) ECONOMY STORE Jacob PENN YAN ■ W e want you lo know that we now own and operate sixty—60—first class chain stores, and that you can purchase your groceries, smoked meats, etc., from us at day in the week. W e buy our merchandise in carload lots at our enormous warehouse in Auburn, N. Y. Then transport it quickly to each of our various branches, thus- insuring fresh goods at the lowest possible prices. every We import all our own Coffees—roast and blend them our Auburn warehouse. . Our Coffee roasting department is a model in its line, the capacity of our roasters be­ ing more than 5000 lbs. every ten hours. Coffees shipped to our stores are roasted the and often wann when received. That is w h y our Coffee business is same growing so rapidly. D on’t fail to ask the Manager about our special drive, for the next two weeks, on canned goods, etc., in full case lots. Pastry Flour Gran. Sugar Corned Beef sack 7 5 c Quality Guaranteed lb. 9 Pure Cane N o . 2 tin 2 2 c S o m e V alue ! Head Rice, lb....................................08c Dry Beans, lb....................................08c Minute Tapioca, plcg ..................... 12c. Bakers Chocolate, 1-2 lb ................ 17c Nut Oleo—Cupid, lb........................27c Tomatoes, can ............................. 10c Corn, can ............................. 10c Peas, c a n ......................................... 15c Economy Coffee, lb. 31c Puffed Wheat, pkg ........................ 12c Puffed Rice, pkg ............................ 15c Instant P o s t u m ............................. 23c Eagle Milk ...................................... 19c Shredded Wheat, pkg .................... 10c Cream of Wheat, pkg .................... 22c Wheatena, plcg ................................ 22c Post Toasties, pkg ........................... 08c Scrap Tobacco, pkg ........................ 08c Codfish, wood box, lb .................... 28c Certo, bottle ....' ....................... 28c Thread ............................................... 05c Hair Nets, Double mesh, ea .. 05c Tacks ............................................... 05c Argo Starch, pkg ............................ 09c Nesco Scrap Tobacco, sweet .. 7 l-2c C of H Mayonnaise, qts ................ 85c C o f H Mayonnaise, ‘ pts ................ 45c C of H Mayonnaise, 8 oz ............ 25c C of H Cigars ............................. 10c Daniel Webster, 1-8 bbl ............. 1.03 Pillsbury, 1-8 bbl ............................ 98c Hecker’s Flour, 1-8 bbl................. 1.03 Pure Buckwheat Flour, 10 lb. .. 49c Sunny Monday Soap, 6 bars .... 25c Floating Soap, 6 bars ............... 25c A. & H. Soda, pkg .................... 6 l-2c Bakers Cocoa, 1-2 lb ..................... 19c Yeast Foam, pkg ........................ 08c Vinegar, gal.....................................30c Molasses, gal ............................... i. 80c Nesco Coffee, lb ............................. 33c Davis Baking Powder .............. 20c Royal Baking Powder, lb. ..... 42c Palmolive Soap ....................... 7 l-2c Red Cross M i l k ..............................16c Peanut Butter, lb .......................... 21c Pure Lard, lb..................................18c Compound, lb ................................... 17c Campbells Beans, c a n .................. 10c Pancake Flour, C o f H, 5 lbs. .. 35c Steero Beef Cubes, pkg ................. 25c Parowax, pkg..................................10c London Creams, lb........................15c N. B. C. Grahams, lb ..................... 15c Ivory Soap ..................................... 7c Econom y Tea, lb ............................. 53c Nesco Tea, lb..................................63c Nesco Scrap Tobacco, plain .. 5c Package N. B. C. Goods .......... 5c Lux, 3 pkgs......................................29c Jelly Powder, C o f H, 3 pkgs. .. 25c Nesco C ig a r s .....................................7 l-2c Economy Cigars ........................ 5c Nesco Flour, 1-8 bbl......................92c Plum Pudding, lb .......................... 30c Gum, all kinds .............................. 04c Cleaned Currants .......................... 18c Oysters ............................................75c Gold Dust ......................................25c Mothers Oats ........................ 29c Tip Top Pop Corn . ..................... Sc Neptune Sardines ................. 12 l-2c i ., r/: Campbell’s Soup 3 cans 25c Com Flakes 4 pkg. 3 0 c Evaporated Mi 3 cans 35c It is our fixed policy to give exact weight and measure—no deviation. We want patrons to feel perfectly safe in sending servants or children to do shop- ping with us. All merchandise on our shelves is plainly marked. Our managers are men of more than ordinary standing and ability, and are ap- pointed by us only when we become convinced that they will accord fair dealing anti courteous treatment. Every article in our store is fully guaranted by us, and we cheerfully refund the full purchase price in any instance where the merchandise does not prove up to such guarantee. We carry many items such as Kerosene Oil, bulk Molasses, sliced most chain stores do not stock. / Come in and join our contest. Over $300 in prizes. P National Economy Stores r M r . H . J . B A S S A G E , M g r .

xml | txt