OCR Interpretation


Penn Yan express. (Penn Yan, N.Y.) 1866-1926, August 09, 1923, Image 6

Image and text provided by Yates County History Center & Museums

Persistent link: http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn83031516/1923-08-09/ed-1/seq-6/


Thumbnail for 6
I Page Six THE* P E N N Y A N EXPRESS, PE N N V A N , N.Y., TR H U S D A Y , AU G U S T 9, 1923 ,r Rotary Club The m e e t in g this w e e k w a s held on W e d n e s d a y instead o f Tuesday. T h e R o t a r ian s from B a t h w e r e the guests of the local C lu b . R e v . L o w e ll M a c P h e r s o n . o f K e u k a P a r k , xvaa one o f the speakers. M r M a c P h e r s o n served as a Y. M. C. A. secretary overseas and has h a d w id e experien c e as a lectlrer. W D o n ’t throw aw a y cobs after you h a v e cut off the corn. P u t them in m e a t stew a n d 1 taste the pleasant sweetish flavor they im p a rt. W h e n the dish .is done take them out and scrape the stew that clin g s to them b a c k into the pot. ^ f C o r ila n d i °f W a s h in g S q u a re J a n e t A . F a i l - b a n k . ^ F o r the Latest L o c a l N e w s Compare the Geneva D aily Times W i t h the Others T h e n Su b s c r ibe for T h e Tim e s H O M E R C. P E L T O N , A g e n t 109 W a l n u t St. COPYRIGHT ty THE eOBBS-MERRILL CO CHAPTER II I § ti ti ti I fa? § ti 8 Penn Y a n , N e w Y o r k B . T . M A L L O R Y FIRE, TORNADO, AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE Farm Property and Tornado Insurance a Special Feature in this Agency 18 Arcade Block 1885 C A L L 1923 N. S. D A I L E Y , A g e n t Any Kind of Insurance Office, Room 1 Over The Lown Dry Goods Co. Phone, Office, 228 Res., 326-J C a ll | G O O D S P E E D j & M IL L E R H A IL INSURANCE Phone 130-m M i l l i n e r y of Class and Distinction The . Lown Dry Goods Company Transplanted. The delight of her first ride in a train speedily crowded the sorrow ot parting from A n n ’s mind. She sat straight and taut on the hard seat be­ side her mother, her lips compressed, her eyes blazing. Mrs. Cortlandt left her alone, except that now and then she tried the effect o f poking her un­ fortunate hair this- w a y or that, or twitched her clothes in a fretful effort to change the look o f the child’s eager, staring face. T o Ann, used only to the tranquil­ lity of a sleepy village, the confusion at the terminal w a s amazing. The haste with which people left the car gave her a sense of calamity, the P e n n Y a n . keener because it w a s unexplained. A ferry -b o a t ! Occasional copies of H a r p e r ’s Illustrated W e e k ly had reached Milton Center, and Ann w a s prepared for the extraordinary look of these maritime monsters, but no wood- cut could have prepared her fo r the sickening and delightful feeling of un­ certainty under her feet. She seized her mother’s arm appealingly, in an ecstasy o f excitement, and the pallid lady said absently, \Y e s — horrid, isn’t it?” Ann abandoned her and worm ed through the group o f people at the bow. Ahead of them the shore sloped swiftly back from the w a t e r -fro n t ; and in the foreground the high steeple of a church shepherded a huddled col­ lection of buildings. Ann had never known that a city could be like that— miles o f It, overwhelm ing and in trlguing. Suddenly the porfn- ♦- ferry-house sw a llow w i • shrank back from the ja r r in g grind o f the landing, convinced that no mere boat could stand such treatm e n t ! The crowd swelled forw a rd, and her mother reclaimed her rebukingly. Outside the ferry-house they paused, a g h a s t N o t wishing to break the new s o f A m i’s existence to her husband on the ferry- dock, Mrs. Cortlandt had not notified him of the hour of her arrival, and fo r all her fashionable clothes, she w a s almost as dazed by the city’s con­ fusion as Ann, who frankly gaped, and adored it. The Knickerbocker'* stage w a s' w a it­ ing as they came from the narrow tun­ nel of the ferry-house. The four big jhorses that drew It pranced in the trodden snow, and the bells on their necks glistened in the sunlight. Mrs. Cortlandt and Ann climbed in and seated themselves on the long bench that ran down the side of the coach. Beside her, her mother sat trem b ling v isib ly ; it w a s evident to the most casual beholder that Mrs. H u d s o n Cortlandt w a s badly frightened. At length they started, with a Jin­ gling of bells and a plunging o f horses that made the people on the street turn to watch them glide past. Ann pressed her face to the window, now and then impatiently wiping aw a y the cloud of her breath on the glass. F O R R E N T □ the towering elms she had known. u p W ashington square w her moth- _______________________________________________! Everything she saw enchapted h e r ; 1 even the bar£ ailanttis trees seemed : a better thing, in their novelty, than □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ Two Warehouses □ on N . Y . C. Tracks □ x □ o □ er’s destination, for here, on the frin g e □ of the town, the Cortlanrlts and a few □ other leading fam ilies had recently □ built themselves new houses. The □ i place w a s inclosed with a high ,iron □ ' fence, which gave the little park an D air of gentility. □ ’ darkening eyes at the ample, dignified □ Ann looked with □ □ □ N-B □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ ■a D □ D □ n □ Six Loading Doors □ Suitable for Grapes, Apples, or Produce. houses, rose pink against the snow. \D o e s my new fath e r live here?” she demanded. A lonely feeling m a d e her voice break. Suddenly she real­ ized for the first time the threat of a strange relationship. H e r mother nodded. \H i s brother APPLY TO □ □ 3 □ does,” she said, \M r . H e n d ricks Cort- ^ landt. Your— my— M r. H u d son Cort- □ landt lives with him.” □ □ □ □ □ □ Yates Lumber Co. r □ □ □ □ □ PENN YAN, N. Y. »# Y O U R D R U G S T O R E ✓ EVERY woman In this town Is interested In pure drugs. We keep that always in mind when buying drugs. Full stock of i Drugs, Medicines, Pharmaceutics, all of the finest quality. This store is always In a position to fill your orders—or the doctor’s It w a s the largest o f the houses that she timidly approached, and. clinging tremulously to Ann. summoned cour­ age to climb the w ide stepy. and pull a silver bell handle m^ieteriously set beside the glass door. A black man came to admit them, and Ann looked at him gapingly, unable. In her sur­ prise. to return his gleam ing smile. H e w a s the first negro she h a d 'seen . Mrs. Cortlandt paused. , \Is Mr. Hendricks Cortlandt at home?” she asked and her voice trembled. \Y a s ’m. H e is In de library.” W ith a dexterous turn, the man shut th t front door behind them, and opened one on the right-hand side of the wide hall. Ann had a quick im pression of a lofty room, all lined with books— she had never dream ed that there could be so many— and o f the late afternoon sun coming through the w in ­ dows in long yellow streaks so that a fire under a n a r row m a rble m antel glowed red. Then she saw a tall, old­ ish man rise from his chair and come forward. Im mediately she liked him, in spite of her breathless nervousness. \W e ll, my dear,” Ann heard him say, \back again ?’\ And then his eyes order — promptly and efficiently. If you fell On her. H e looked at her in kind- want the best, and nothing but .the best, ly perplexity. \A n d who is this young the best way to get it is to ALWAYS COME | lady?” he asked. TO THIS STORE, where you will be sure to find the best. Frank Quackenbush « 14 M lAIN ST., P E N N Y A N The little girl glanced expectantly at her toother, but no sound came from her white lips, so she said, as cheerfully as she could: “I am Ann,” and, catching no gleam of intelligence in his attentive eyes, she added, “Ann Byrne, you know.” me. H M »» M rs. Cortlandt looked up to nod a m iserable assent to this announce­ ment. “It m ight have been— less em b a r­ rassing, if you had done so— earlier. H e w a s insane about you. “I w a s afraid .” \ I see. W e shall have to tell him, however. Is this the only one, m a d am ? ” \O h , yes,” M rs. C o rtlandt said, In shocked surprise, \ o f course, if there had been m o re I should have told h i m !” \L e t me look at you, young lady.” H e put a gentle hand under A n n ’s sh a r p chin, and turned her face tow a r d him. \S h e has never looked like me,” her m o ther mourned. \S h e is like her father, in every w a y .” \T h is m a k e s the m an Im portant. . . . W h a t w a s your first husband?” \H e ran a n e w s p a p e r — ju s t a coun­ try one. H e alw a y s expected to do better, but then he died. A n n w r iggled a w a y from the stran­ ger’s im p roprletory touch. \M y fath e r w a s Irish,” she volunteered, \a n d he w a s very clever, and he had red hair, like m e !” \M a c h r e e got into trouble in F e ­ nian riots— I n e v e r k n e w Just w h a t he did— but he had to leave Ireland. . . . W e w e re only m a rried a fe w years . . . H e w a s alw a y s getting into trouble, and he never w o u ld listen to w h a t I told him. . . . W h a t do you think H u d s o n w ill do?” \T h e r e Is only one w a y to an s w e r that,” M r. C o r t landt said sim p ly. H e crossed the room w ith lon g determ ined strides to sum m o n the m a n in the halL \T e ll M r. H u d s o n his w i f e is here,” he directed. M r. C o rtlandt turned to Ann. \ W e 4 h a v e only ju s t finished supper,” he said. \S u p p o s e you and I go and see if there is any left.” T h e child glanced irresolutely at her m other. Ann V a n t e d to stay w ith her, but suddenly she realized that she w a s devastatingly hungry. H e r m o ther caught her eye. \G o w ith him, Ann, fo r m e rcy s a k e s !” she urged irritably. M r. Cortlandt laughed, fo r som e un­ explained, grow n -u p reason, and led h e r a w a y through folding-doors into w hat seemed, indubitably, fairyland. H e r first im p ression w a s of a great gla r e of lig h t ; it w a s like noonday In the big empty room, and she blinked, She Blinked, Bew ildered. bewildered. D irectly under an over­ pow e ring brass chandelier w a s a square table covered with a cloth so w h ite that it glistened like s n o w ; this, then, w a s the dining-room . In M ilton Cen­ ter one sewed, read, and sometimes slept in such an apartm ent, but this one seemed scared to the business of dining. She looked about her with avid curiosity. \W h a t is it?” A n n dem anded breathlessly, pointing to the fixture from w h e n c e the glory sprang. \T h e chandelier?” M r. C o rtlandt In­ quired, bew ildered in his turn. \N o , the light. It isn’t candles— it isn’t paraffin, it— ” \O h , t h a t ! . . , . It is gas.” \ O h !” She recalled w e a r y hours filling lam p s. \D o you put it in like oil ?” Mr. Cortlandt continued to ioor at her blankly. Slow ly a realization of w h o she might be daw n e d on him, and he turned his steady gaze on his sister-in-law, as she trem b led before hjm. \Y o u r child?” he inquired coldly. Mrs. Cortlandt sank Into a ch a ir; she w a s m a n ifestly struggling with teal's. \Y e s ,” she adm itted briefly. \A c h i ld ! B u t my brother said you had no fam ily. . . , D o e s he know, m adam ? ” A s her m o ther w a s now fran k ly crying, Ann took up the burden of their sorry tale, \S h e didn’t tell him,” she confided. \ I am a surprise, and j it is too bad I am not pretty.” T h e head o f the house o f Cortlandt straightened up scornfully. \A h , ” he said, \ I see.” T h e r e w a s an uncom fortable silence ! in the library.: it w a s broken by Ann, j w h o volunteered cheerfully, \S h e has to tbll my new father, now, all about \N o . . . . I’ll tell you about it, but first w e must have supper. A r e you hungry?” Ann gasped. It w a s extraordinary, but the enorm ous appetite which had ravaged her but a moment before w a s gone. \ I — don’t know,” she confessed. M r. Cortlandt drew a chair out for her and, pulling a bell cord, lie sum­ moned the black man and told him to bring food. \Y o u didn’t have gas In— er— M ilton Center?” he suggested. A n n shook her h e a d ; her eyes were sw im m ing with tears, and met. Mr. C o rtlandt’s m iserably. Suddenly he pulled his chair closer to hers, and began to talk to her, rap ­ idly and continuously: at first she w a s so occupied in fighting down her « Inconvenient emotion that she paid little attention, but presently she un­ derstood that he was, with extraordi­ nary kindness, telling her all about gas. She began J o listen attentively. She forgot all about the delicious things she w a s eating as the tale ran o n ; she w a s m o re interested than she had ever been before in all her life. A f t e r that they began to talk of M ilton Center, and she spoke o f Mrs. A llen casually. \Y o u lived w ith her?” M r . Cort­ landt leaned forw a r d . \Y e s . . . . Isn ’t your brother a Christian?” M r. C o rtlandt sat back suddenly. \ I hope so,” he said. \W h y do you ask?’ \W e ll, M rs. A llen took ma and me to live w ith her because she w a s a Christian,” Ann explained. \S h e often said so. . . . She said she hoped she w a s layin g up treasures in heaven. A n d I hope so, too.” & \Y o u r m o ther had no money at all?” \O h , yes, m a had tw o thousand dol­ lars. T h a t is a great am o u n t oi money. M'rs. A llen alw a y s said it w a s a sacred trust— that w a s when ma w a n ted to spend it, you see.” \Y e s , I see. A n d w h a t did you do In M ilton Center, M iss A n n ? ” \ I w e n t to school. I don’t lik e my teacher— not much. A n d o f course 1 * did chores— feedin g the chickens, an helping get supper, an ’ w a s h in g up.’ T h is w a s d e a r and fa m ilia r ground, and A n n chatted pleasantly on. H e i heart w a rm e d tow a r d M r. C o rtlandt in rew a r d fo r his kindly in t e r e s t ; and she poured out unstintingly the simple story o f her life and her m o ther’s. It w a s a good h a lf-h o u r b e fo r e she thought o f return in g to the library. A s M r. C o rtlandt slid back the fold­ ing-door, the sound o f a m a il’s voice harsh anti angry, burst in on them \M y new fath e r ? ” A n n dem a n d e d frow ning. H e r friend nodded, and she peered into the room tinder his arm . A tall m an w a s striding fu r iou s ly a b o u t “It isn ’t that I resent the child,” he w a s storm ing. \ I t to the deceit I can­ not forgive. T h e child, o f course, is a responsibility— I am not a m a n to shirk that— but I hate d e c e it!” H e turned, as his broth e r opened the door. “D o you know w h a t she has done?” he dem anded. M r. H e n d r ick s C o rtlandt nodded, and held A n n back, as she w o u ld have pushed indignantly past him. \T h e r e ’s only one, you know, H u d s o n ,” he said pacifically. \T h e r e m ight ju s t as w e ll h a v e been six.” H i s brother paused, arrested. \S ix ? ” he repeated. T h e w o r d had the force o f an explosion. T h e old e r m an laughed, and A n n w o n d e red w h y . \ O f course,” he said, \it w o u ld have m a d e no difference kad there been, since it is the deceit that you resent, and not the chil­ dren.” n 44 44 M lnniq,” h e r h u s b a n d „ r o a r e d at her, fran t ic appeal in tys voice, \a r e there others?” T h e b r i d j w a s so over­ come by his violence that she m e rely Shook her head speechlessly, but A n n flung off her frien d ’s restraining hand and burst into the room. She con­ fronted her stepfath e r fie r c e ly ; her hands w e r e clenched into little fists. \D o n ’t you d a r e speak to my m o ther like t h a t !” she said. H u d s o n C o r t lan d t glared at her, eye to e y e ; then he sw u n g aw a y , and appealed to the w o r ld at large. \ I s this the child my w i f e asks me to take to my bosom? T h is red-headed, gaw k y girl? T h is spitfire?” \T h e deceit w o u ld have been less, I have no doubt, had she not had red hair,” his broth e r interposed peace­ ably, and to her am a z e m e n t A n n found h e r s e lf laughing convulsively, in spite of her an g e r and fright. H u d s o n cam e suddenly dow n to earth. \W e l l , ” he announced, \M in n ie w ill have to choose betw e e n us— the child or me. I w o n ’t have her, that’s flat. . . I f you'll leave her, I ’ll take you w ith me— i f not, I ’m done w ith y o u !” Som e thing in her m o ther’s lifted fa c e frightened Ann, and she found resolu­ tion fo r fu r t h e r defiance. \ W e don’t 44 w a n t to go w ith you,” she declared p a s ­ sionately. \Y o u can go off to E u r o p e by yourself. . . . W e ’ll stay here.” S h e ended on a softened note, an d she turned her eyes slantingly on her new friend. She thought that he received this declaration som e w h a t coldly, and her heart skipped a beat m iserably. H e w a s looking at his broth e r w ith an ex­ pression that terrified her. W h a t do you wish, M rs. C o rtlandt ?’*' he dem anded. \ I don’t k n o w !” she sobbed. \ I a so u n h a p p y ! H o w can I go? . . . H o w can I stay?” She looked im p lor­ ingly from A n n to her husband, befo r e she buried her fa c e in a m inute pocket handkerchief. H u d s o n C o rtlandt w a s softened by this w a ilin g appeal. \ I am w illin g to look a f t e r the girl,” he said uncom­ fortably. \Y o u could leave her in good hands.” M rs. C o rtlandt looked up w ith a gleam o f returning cheerfulness. “I suppose I m ight,” she m u rm u red. \ I don’t see w h y you can’t send her back w h e r e she cam e fr o m ; it w ill be the sam e fo r her as if you had never m a rried me, except that her keep w ill be paid. . . . W e sail in a w e e k ,” he added briskly. H e w a s obviously glad not to break w ith the pretty crea­ ture he had m a rried. H e turned to his brother, w ith a specious relief in his anner. \It is all perfectly sim p le after a if— isn’t re?*” M r. H e n d r icks Cortlandt looked at him for a moment, and Ann wondered if J w a s som ething in his steady gaze that caused the younger man to drop his eyes uneasily. A t length he said, \ I shall be alone here, when you are gone. . . . It is possible that I might, fo r a time, undertake the re­ sponsibility o f M iss A n n — with the*un­ derstanding, of course, that you w ill, later on, relieve me.” H e turned to the silent child. “W o u ld you like to stay with me?” he asked gently. Ann felt the tears b u m against her eyelids, so she only nodded. She felt m iserably certain that he did not want her. H e turned to M rs. Cortlandt. \ I assure you. m adam , that your daugh­ ter w ill be as w e ll cared fo r as lies in my pow e r. P e r h a p s a little girl in my home m a y prove a blessing. Eh, M iss Ann?” T h e child w a s spared the difficulty o f an answ e r, fo r at the moment when she felt that a suprem e effort o f some 4 sort w a s expected o f her, the library door sw u n g open, and a high clear voice cried, \D o I intrude, H e n d ricks?” \ G a d ! ” said Hudson. \ I t ’s Clarissa.! Ann w a s conscious o f a general dis­ may, and that it centered m y steriously on her. She had never know n anyone could be so lovely as the lady w h o appeared In the high doorw a y . H e r h a ir w a s w a r m ly brow n , a n d ,s h i n i n g ; it hung about her face in artfu l and com p li­ cated arrangem e n ts, and her eyes w e r e shining and quick and pretty, above her bright pink cheeks. Com p a red with its brittle elegance her m o ther’s hard country thinness had a common look. She laughed as she cam e down the room, show ing pretty w h ite teeth. A fam ily ja r already, H u d s o n ? ” she dem anded, sending quick and am u sed glances from her em b a r rassed brother to his lim p bride. \D o v e s in their lit­ tle nest, you k n o w !” She turned to M r. C o rtlandt and her darting look dropped to Ann. w h o stood pressed close beside him. \W h y — w h e r e did you find that, H e n d ricks?” she queried, her voice suddenly shrill, and all the sm iling sw e e tness gone from her eyes. \T h i s is M iss A n n Byrne, C larissa, and fate has sent her to me.” “Y o u m ean?” \S h e is H u d s o n ’s stepdaughter, but It has been arran g e d that she is to stay here w ith me.” M rs. R e n n e s lyer sw u n g around to her youn g e r brother, w ith a great sw irl o f blu e gauze skirts. \ S o ! ” she cried. \T h i s is w h a t your m ad m a r ­ riage has d o n e ! A child— le f t here w ith H e n d r i c k s !” , 4 \ I believe that I am glad to have her, C larissa,” M r . C o rtlandt inter­ vened. \A l r e a d y I am charm e d w ith her.” \C h a r m e d ? ” H e r eyes sw e p t A n n from h e r untidy red h a ir to her shab­ bily shod feet, and she laughed in­ credulously. \Y o u a r e m a k ing the best o f it— that is evident— but w h y should she stay with you? C a n ’t H u d ­ son assum e his responsibilities? I f you w a n t a child about— and I am sure I don’t understand w h y you do— there’s my H e n d ricks, or little F a n n y C o rt­ landt.” \T h a t w ill do, C la r i s s a ! ” M r, Cort­ landt spoke so sternly that A n n shrank tmek, frightened. \T o w h a t a r e w e Indebted fo r the honor o f this visit?” \ I h a v e a loge at W a l l a c k ’s thea­ ter to n ig h t ; I cam e in to see if H u d ­ son and my charm ing new sister-in- la w w o u ld care to share it w ith me. It Is M a d a m e Rachel. \ O h !” cried M rs. H u d s o n . “S h e Is that fam o u s French actress, isn’t she?\ I could b e ready in a very fe w m o­ m ents— fifteen, at the m o s t !” M rs. R e n n e s lyer sw e p t her w ith in­ different eyes. \V e r y w e ll,” she said, , . indifferently. She established h e r s e lf in a chair by the fire. M r. C o rtlandt seated h im s e lf oppo­ site her, leaning to w a r d her w ith a curious look o f an antagonist. \Q o with your mother, A n n ,” he said. \Y o u can doubtless help her h u r r y .” A n d so A n n ’s fu t u r e w a s decided. W h e n she w a s alone w ith her mother, duripg the last precious w e e k o f their com p anionship, she found that the only w a y to avoid m u tual tears w a s not to mention the com ing parting, so she obligin g ly refrained. T h e r e w e r e plenty o f other things to think about. In the first place she w a s plunged into an orgy of buying. She and her moth­ er both had com p letely new w a r d ­ robes. T h e pretty bride bought lav ­ ishly, in spite of her im m inent visit to Paris. People cam e and w e n t during the sw ift interlude, but the child retained no clear m em o ry o f them. M rs. R e n ­ neslyer w a s the only one w h o s e initial im p ression persisted through later fa m i l i a r i t y ; Ann alw a y s rem em b ered the m a licious prettiness o f her first ap­ pearance. A t her broth e r -in -law ’s re­ quest, M rs. W illia m Cortlandt brought her daughter F a n n y to see the new ­ comer, but the tw o children w e r e shy days with her mother. M rs. H u d s o n w a s inclined to like this sister-in-law. “She is a widow, just as I w a s ,” M rs. H u d s o n inform e d Ann. \E x c e p t that her little girl is pretty. F a n n y is sweet, isn’t she? I hope you w ill try to be like her, A n n : she is such a little lady.” Ann clung to her m o ther in a w a y that w a s flattering but disconcerting. 4 She follow e d her m iserably about the h o u s e ; stood beside her bureau when she curled her blonde h a i r ; helped her to button the com p licated new frocks, and to pack her finery into two shiny new trunks. N o t w ith s t a n d in g all their p r e p a r a ­ tions, h o w e v e r ,’ it w a s not until they clung together at the dock that the m o ther and daughter suddenly adm it­ ted the serious nattire of their separa­ tion. M rs. Cortlandt shed a few gen­ tle tears and prettily besought her brother-in-law to be kind to his charge, but A n n only hung desperately about her m o ther’s neck, dry-eyed and silent. In looking back on the leave-taking it alw a y s seemed to her that in the mo­ ment before the gangplank w a s w ith ­ draw n , she grew appreciably older. She never forgot the feel o f her moth­ er’s cool fresh cheek against her own, or the last lovely glim p s e o f her. young, agitated and charm ing, as she leaned out over the stern, betw e e n the churning side-paddles, crying and sm iling together, and w a v in g and kiss­ ing both her hands to the old man and the child on the dock. H e r m o ther had been gone only a fortnight whjen. one snowy afternoon, M r. Cortlandt returned home earlier NEWS OF THE CHURClfti it T h e T w o Children W e r e Shy of Each Other, o f each other, and A n n had no tim e f o r contem p o raneous -n h e r last than w a s his custom, Ann knew at once, as soon as she had run to meet him, that som e thing terrible had hap­ pened, because he w a s so sorry fo r her. T h e com passion in his eyes aw a k e n e d all the bravery in her soul. T h e w o rst h a d h a p p e n e d ; there had been a col­ lision at sea, and a scattered few pas­ sengers, picked up by another ship, had returned to tell the tragic tale of vthe doom ed Arctic, which had sunk off the banks, w hile only two days out from N e w York. F o r a time M r. C o r t ­ landt refused to give up hope, and every day he went to the offices o f the C o llins’ lin e ; but as time went on he w a s forced to abandon any expecta­ tion o f the rescue o f his brother and his bride. B a c k in Am e rica, President Pierce then cast about am o n g his supporters fo r another m inister to Sw itzerland, and in W a s h in g t o n square M r. Cort­ landt devoted him s e lf to com forting a passionately rebellious child. H e r sor* row , he knew, w o u ld pass, and fo r h im s e lf he felt a curiously poignant regret at the sudden end o f his lovely an d foolish young sister-in-law — a deeper regret, possibly, than if she h a d been less lovely and m o re w ise. (To be continued.) MRS. BUTLER’S ACHES AND PAINS Vanished After Using Lydia E. Pinkham’s Vegetable Compound Philadelphia, Pa . — 4 ‘When I cleaned ;e last April I must have overlifted, fo r a f t e r th a t I had pains and aches all the tim e and w a s so discouraged. I could hardly do m y ow n housew o rk, and I could n o t c a r r y a b a s ­ k e t o f g r o c e r ies fro m the store nor w a lk even fo u r or five squares w ithout g e t ­ ting terrible pains in m y back and abdo­ m en and lo w e r lim bs. I w e n t to visit a friend in M t. H o lly, N . J., and she said, ‘M r s . B u tler, w h y don’t you tak e L y d ia E . Pinkham ’s V e g e t a b le Compound? ’ M y husband said that i f it did her so much good fo r the sam e trouble, I should try it. So I have taken it and it is doing me good. W h e n e v e r I feel heavy or bad, it puts m e righ t on m y fe e t again. I am able to do m y w o r k w ith pleasure and am gettin g stron g and stout. I still take the V e g e t a b le Com pound and L iv e r Pills, and am using L y d ia E. Pinkham ’s Sanative W a s h . ’ ’ - M r s . C h a r l e s B u t ­ l e r , 1233 S.H a n s o n S t ,,W .P h ila., Pa. W r i t e to L y d ia E . Pinkham Medicine Co., Lynn, M a s s ., fo r a free copy o f L y d ia E. Pinkham ’s Private T e x t Book upon “ Ailm e n ts o f W o m e n .’’ INDUCES H u m p h r e y s ’ N u m b e r “F o r t y ” Induces Repose, an d N a t u r a l, R e freshing Sleep. F o r Insom nia, Sleepless­ ness, W a k e fu ln e s s , Restless­ ness. N o Narcotic, N o Opiate, N o Dope, N o habit form in g D r u g s , Strictly Hom eopathic. 30c. and $1.00, at all Drug Stores, or sent on receipt of price, or Parcel Post collect on delivery. B o o k on the treatm ent o f all diseases m a iled free. s H um p h reys* Borneo. Medicine Co., William Street. New York. ISA When you feelt^A nervous, tired, w o rried or despondent it is a sure sign y o u n e e d M O T T ’S N E R V E R I N E P I L L S . T h e y renew the norm a l vigor an d m a k e life w o rth living. B e sure an d ask for Mott’s Nerverine Pills W ILLIA M S M F C . CO , Props., Cleveland, O . PRESBYTERIAN. — Sunday, A u g u s t 12th. Morin, ship at 10:30. Mr. Imbrie will nr i — E v e n in g service at the cC;> q u a tent with special music a™- dress. v — T h is congregation will U6it F r id a y m o rning, August 10th Protestan t s of the community special M e m o rial Service for th, \ Presiden t H a r d in g at the church at 10:30. T i B A P T I S T . — Rev. E llis Gilbert, pastor of J F i r s t B a p tist Church, of t w Conn., preached an able and serm o n at the morning service - S u n d a y m o rning, last. — N e x t Sunday morning the speaV w i l l be Rev. F. N. Darling, pagt0r ^ the Conklin Avenue Baptist Chum 1 r Bingham ton, N. Y. % — P r a y e r meeting on Thursday et, n in g in charge of Mr. C. E. Guile ‘ M E T H O D I S T . — T h e pastor will preach S u n d a y m o rning. There will be vesper service in the afternoon, Z account of the Chautauqua pro3 to be given in the tent at 7:30. — P r a y e r m eeting on Thursday §1 n in g to which all are invited. 1 — T h e community needs the uplj* o f the Chautauqua program. We^ h e lp in g a w o rthy cause when we b;i a ticket, and attend the entert^' m ents. L e t us give it our hearty an-' port. The Christian Scientists ho!f: services Sunday morning at elevij o’clock in their rooms in the Ey; wood Theatre Building. Subject-' “Spirit.” T r u s t e e ’ s Proceeding Present were President Cram?; Trustees Shepard, Windnagle, She! • idan, Edington, Ballard and Cant, bell. The minutes of the previous met­ ing were read and approved. ; Bills presented were audited ani: ordered paid out of the proper fundi The following permits were grant ed: To Fred Reed to construct a framt 18x20 at his premises, '3® Elm street. To John Pollar to erect a fran; building 10x15 at 149% Seneca St To Mary Bridgman to build a net cement sidewalk at 222 Yiberty St To the Penn Yan Fruit Packing k sociation to build a frame packing house 40x100 on their property ea;: of Clinton street tracks. To Serefine Bros, to park theu truck on Elm street in front of th ; i Roche restaurant. Y E. C. Gillette, representing ty; Penn Yan Fruit Growers Cooperate Packing Association, appeared he-!: fore the board, requesting a permi: to construct a switch across Clinto: St., running south from their prop­ erty on the east side of the preseuf tracks. Property owners living ior the vicinity of the crossing alsoap*: peared to object against the proper ed switch. O w ing to the fact that blue-prints were not available, mat-, ter was adjourned to a special meet­ ing Monday evening, August 6th. It was moved and seconded that the matter of changing the'name o| East Main street to East Avenue, rt-h quested in a petition submitted t|; the board, be tabled to the next meet-, ing for action. Carried.' . . It was moved and seconded that the Village Attorneys be instructed to take up with the Pennsylvania! Railroad Co., the matter of planking the Crossings, with the request tha| the resolution passed by the Boari.j to that effect be enforced. Carried) It was moved and seconded tha't the recent resolution requesting % A. Beach to make fireproof his garb­ age in the ' rear of the Universal!-. Building be turned over to the lage Attorneys with power to actj Carried. The Clerk was instructed to wrM 11 the local Express Company in regtfj to obstructing the traffic on \Vatff|. street by the parking of the Express wagons across the street. On ^motion duly made and second­ ed the meeting was adjourned. USE T H E OLD D M A R S H A W at all Druggists, or sent prepaid* W i l l i a m s M r a . G o . C le v e l a n d * USED MOTORCYCLES A t Rock Bottom Clean-up Prices m « i N o w ’ s t h e T i m e to g e t Y o u r s / CASH OR CREDIT 1ndian I and Ace Distributor* GEO. L. MINER CO New Store and Service Station 184-188 CLINTON AVL SO- ROCHESTER, N. Y. ens ■ Frid O f £ surv and she two -este eig h •chib Suni resd Him mad Jorg wee Mrs trip the in a b ■Cor _ the day d \ \ met por tri j Mis ten ■Gri las tur Mr Hi< ted um Mr Bri Pi i tor Bit tol ors flo’ me ial wi an foi He ho on an -er$ tir at on ” r id Hi at no er UT fc re or to M D t i H d i di L * * IV YV ti w t< n ti « t< C 81 T* d B D . n t< V t< d M 01 s< a C C I J h b a I a t 1 s i i < 3 j t a S ' t V > u ite. . a I / * » :ge S. Sb Torney P e n n ea H. V» r> A/T* Pk

xml | txt