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The universe. (New York) 186?-187?, May 12, 1870, Image 2

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THE U N I V E R S E : W E E K L Y JOURNAL. THE UNIVERSE. M A Y 1 2 . 1 8 7 0 . B O U G H T . BY MISS E. 1*. CHEE8B0R0UGH. B o u g h t w ith th is purse o f g o ld And these diam o n d s decking m y hair, B o u g h t w ith these stately grounds, And t h is m a n sion of b e a u ty rftrc ; B o u g h t w ith t h a t glitterin g coach, A n d s teeds prancing before m y door, B o u g h t—w ell, never m ind now, I am r ich w h e re once I w a s p o o r. N o w , Colin, go sell y o u r s e lf too j . , T h e r e isso m e th in g in m o n e y —don tsig n , I t brings us s u p r e m e s t c o n ten t— You say th e re’s a te a r in m y eye. I t shall never fall dow n , tru s ty lricnd, T o stain th is am b c r-hucd d r e s s ; Am I happ y ? A h ! g a y as a q u e en, A l i t t l e w e a ry som e tim e s, I contess. Mv lo r d he is n o t very young— I ’m a g ir l yet, dear Colin, y o u know ; M y lord loves th e chase, a n d th e song T h a t c ircles a roun d th e w ine s flow ; F rom a chalice o f g o lden and pearl , H e drinks gladly th e rich rosy w ines, ■While I sit here a n d muse all a lone— F o r a w o m a n ’s no t needed a ll tim es. A h ! Colin, I th in k I see now T h e rose-covered porch w h e re we m e t, F e e l th e fond, e a g e r c lasp of o u r hands ; T h e re a rc som e thing s we never forget. B u t g o , Colin—g o , e a rly friend, F o r sec how these b u r n ing tears fall ; I hoped t h a t g r e a t w e a lth w as c o n ten t, B u t I fear t h a t love’s b e tte r th a n all. — Southerner. JULIETTA; OR, THE BEAUTI­ FUL HEAD. : MRS. ST. SIMON. ( Concluded .) T h e heart o f m a n is an in c o n s tan t t h i n g ; this is a truth w h ich every w ise m a n and every fool m a y prove by h i s ow n . A few m o n ths before, who could have believed that A lfred w ould ever lo v e a w o m a n again ? and still he loved Julietta, and m o re w a r m ly than he had before loved E m ilia. N o t with grea t e r purity, in truth, for he had essayed the virtu e o f his old w atchw o r d , “ victory I” upon Ju lietta ,a n d th e consciousn e s s o f this w a s the w e a k spot w h ich Satan used for his destruction, and for the destruction o f the sw eet, unhappy m a iden w h o yielded to his suit. H e had broken h is faith to the deceased E m ilia ! T h is t h o u g h t startled him from his sw e e t e s t dream s in J u lietta ’s arm s. H e tried to banish i t by g a iety, by je s t and laughter, but he w a s un su c c e ssfu l. T h e g r e a t e r his efforts to tear the poisoned arrow from his heart, the deeper did it enter. A lfred w a s now in a sad c o n d ition. H e had becom e jea lo u s , and he kn e w n o t w h o was h i s rival. A ll his toil and search w a s to dis­ cover h im ; and both were o f course fruitless, lor Julietta w a s faithful and devoted to his happiness. H e con c e a led h i s inward stru g ­ g le s from her with the grea t e s t care ; for he w a s unw illing t o distress her even for a mo­ m e n t, w ithout b e in g certain th a t his doubts w ere w e ll founded— a d e licacy w h ich w a s as gr e a t a proof o f his lo v e for J u lietta a s o f the diseased state o f his ow n m in d . T o a healthy m ind, such a situation w o u ld hav e been in s u p ­ portable. A condition so unhappy, how e v er, could n o t be o f lon g endurance in a . m a n lik e A l ­ fred, and th e c r isis soon arrived. I t m u s t h a v e been a fearful one, s o little w a s it displayed e x t e r n a lly ; its consequ e n c e s were soon v isi­ ble to all. A lfred becam e g a y — g a y e r than he had ever been before. A n observer could tell from the first g la n c e that t h is ga iety w a s the offspring o f m any losses, or o f som e one loss o f g r e a t m a g n itud e . H e h im s e lf also appeared to b e conscious o f it. H e raised hi3 voice alou d in scoffing m e r rim e n t a g a in s t heaven and hell— a n d a g a in s t h i s own early dream s o f hap p iness. H is wild revels began an e w ; his am o u r s m u ltip lied from day to d a y ; and s t ill he could not neg lect J u l ie t t a ; on the contrary, his love for her appeared to grow m ore passionate— h e follow ed anxiously her every glan c e , he h u n g upon every word that passed her lips. I t seem e d , indeed, as i f be had becom e un­ faithful to her only for the sak e o f preserving her fidelity. Y o u m a y sm ile at this rem a rk, but it is based upon a deep kn o w led g e o f the hum a n heart. It is n e g lect alon e on the part o f the m a n , which so far restores a w o m a n who loves to herself, that ou t o f revenge sh e can d i s ­ pense her favor to another. T h e in fidelity o f her lover is but a sp u r w L ich in c it e s her to regain him , and the m ore passiouate her hat­ red o f her rival, so m u c h the m o re passionate is her affecdon for the faithless ob j e c t o f her love. T h is w a s the case also with Ju lietta 1 A s A lfred grew m ore a n d m ere fickle and vol­ atile, in the sam e proportion her love for him grew in strength and ardor. N o tw ith stan d ing this, how e v er, he had m iscalcu lated , for her passion put on an air o f an x iety and gloom ; and if it w a s s c a r c e ly questionable that a diseased ex c it a b ility o f the m ind had generated the condition in w h ich A lfred found him self, i t w a s certain that with Julietta but a sin g le step w a s w a n ting to lead her to m a d n e ss. T h u s this stran g e pair passed fumed (lowers. “ H o w sw e e t I” she said again, and bent still low e r to read the inscription upon the m a rble slab, w h ich was entirely hid­ den by their lu x u r iant grow th. “ W h o is it that reposes here?\ B u t she started back quickly, for a fragm ent o f m o u ldered paper glan c e d from am id the leaves, upon w h ich she plainly recognized the w o rds, w ritten in A l­ fred’s hand : “ T h ine, even i n d e a th ! \ “ T h y h a n d - w r itin g !’’ sh e cried, read the words once m ore, and then ask e d passionate­ ly, “ W h o rests here ?’’ A lfred had turned pale as death, b u t recov­ erin g h im s e lf quickly, he lau g h e d w ildly, and replied, “ A dead m istress o f m ine I” and striking the paper d e e p in to the earth with his sw o rd-cane, added, “ L o o k , thu s wither th e fairest flow ers— thus perish the m o st s a ­ cred vow s o f lo v e ! W h o can say how soon “ H o ld !” interrupted Ju lietta , w ith falter­ in g voice, and fixed a cold, death lik e gla n c e upon him . “ N o , no 1” he exclaim e d , and clasped Her passionately in his arm s, w h ile bou n d less love shone in all his features— “ N o , no, my Ju lietta, never! B u t aw a y from b e r e l’ A s if overcom e with terror, he hurried her from the church-yard. . A s , on the follow ing m o rning, the 1 rincc returned from his accu stom e d ride, he noticed a great crowd before the dw e llin g o f the opera sin g e r . J u lietta. Officers and guards hurried back and forth, and now th e D irector ot the P o lice stepped from the house. _ . “ W h a t is the m a tter h e r e ? ” cried the P r in c e . . A dreadful crim e has been com m itted ! replied the C o m m issary. “ C o u n t A lfred was this m o r n ing found dead in the dw e llin g of the opera-singcr, Ju lietta. S h e h a s pois­ oned him .\ T h e P r in c e shuddered, turned pale, and iith stran g e agitation ordered his coach m a n to drive on. Ju lietta ’s cham b e rm a id had testified as fol­ low s : A lfred and her m istress had returned to the house the even in g before, after a lon g w a lk. T h e C o u n t w a s very c h e e r f u l; J u lietta, on the contrary, evidently depressed and gloom y , but sh e took gr e a t pains to app e a r pleasan t and g a y . A bou t 9 o'clock, t h e y sa t dow n to supper, w h e n the cham b e r m a id le f t them . On the follow in g m o rning, as J u lietta had not rung for her by 10 o'clock , sh e w a s seized w ith alarm , and foreboded som e m ishap. Sh e ventured first t o enter the ante-cham b e r, then the boudoir. H e r e lay C o u n t A lfred, dead and cold, h a l f upon the sofa, h a l f upon the flo o r ; besid e him , holding the lifeless body in a convulsive em b race, the se n s e less Julietta. A fter m a n y un su c c e ssfu l attem p ts, sh e was able at la s t to recall her to consciousn e s s. Ju lietta glared around her for a m o m e n t like one frantic, but a s her glan c e fell upon the body, with th e p iercin g scream , “ I am tby m u r d e r e ss!” sh e threw h e r s e lf upon i t again , em b r a c e d it, and a g a in san k in to in s e n s i­ bility. J u lietta w a s brought to trial, and sh e at on c e con f e s s e d the crim e . T h e m o tive had been jea lo u s y . S h e related w ith gr e a t calm ­ ness how the purpose ripened in her bosom , how sh e had lon g m e d itated upon it, and at la s t resolved to carry it in to e x e c u t io n . Sh e had loved C o u n t A lfred on c e — hence her m o ­ m entary w e a k n e s s after the a c t w a s d o n e ; but s h e did n o t r e g r e t it; on the contrary, i f it were possible for A lfred to be returned to life again , sh e w o u ld do the deed ag a in — for he w a s a m o n s t e r ! I leav e it to you to decid e co n c e r n in g the iigh t o f su c h a confession. T h e sag e j u d g e s o f received it a s a n ack n o w led g m e n t of gu ilt, in a l l f o r m o f la w ; and the ph y sician to whom J u l ietta ’s a d v o c a t e app e a led , declar ed th a t sh e w a s in perfect p o s s e s s io n o f her se n s e s — n a y , that she did n o t seem to ex h ib it the least distu r b a n c e o f in te lle c t , and was accordin g ly acco u n t a b le t o the law s. D o not distort your m o u th, m y friend 1 s u c h m en are found in the profession at the presen t day, who can n o t s e e beyond the reach o f their own noses. T h e law s o f that tim e and o f th a t lan d were interpreted and e n forced with a ll the barbarity o f the m iddle a g e s . T h e letter o f the law said death, and the senten c e w a s laid before th e P r ince for his s ign a tu r e . T h e P r in c e , it is said , m o v ed by t h e youth and beauty o f the opera sin g e r , offered her pardon ; be this a s it m a y , it pleased his h igh ­ ness to sig n the sen t e n c e , and three days after, at an early hour in the m o r n ing, J u lietta 's h e a d fell upon the scaffold ! H e r body w a s g iv e n to t h e ana t o m ical t h e ­ atre. T h e dissector caused it t o be buried in private ; the head he preserved. S o o n after­ ward, h e resign e d his post a n d le f t . N o one kn e w the place o f his retreat. On a storm y F e b r u a r y even in g o f the year 1792, a band o f furious san s -culottes hurried up the ru e S t . H o n o r e , d r a g g in g in their (1st a stran g e r o f nob le and stately a p ­ pearance. T h e y stopp e d before a gloom y , antiq u a ted b u ild in g , and k n o c k in g violently a t the door, cried o u t : “ C o m e out, c itizen L e P e t i t ! Open the door. W e brin g you a n e w custom e r . A w indow in the first story w a s now o p e n ­ ed, and a sin g u lar figure, with a lam p in its hand, m a d e its app e a r a n c e . I t w a s a m a n , app a r e n tly v e r g in g toward h i s six t ie t h year, with a brow n is h , yellow face ; a la r g e black patch covered his left eye, and a lo o s e dress- in g gow n , variegated w ith large flow ers, hung ab o u t his m e a g r e lim b s . U p o n bis head he wore a fox-colored in the m o rning, i f thou dost not torture lnm to death in the m e a n w h ile w ith thy quackery. C om e, com r a d e s!” H e shook the D o ctor by the hand, beckoned to his com r a d e s, and al departed with gr e a t uproar, as they had ° \ T h e d e v i l !” m u ttered the D o c tor to him ­ s e l f ; “ I w o u ld they were all under the g u il­ lotin e I” . , . - I T h e n turning to the prisoner, he continued in G erm a n : “ C o u r a ge, poor w retch ; perhaps I can save thee. Y o u arc not the first whom my craft has rescued from the hands o f these bloodhounds. T h e y have n o t the lea s t su s ­ picion o f it indeed, or it were all over with y head. L e t us hope for the best. “ Y o u are a G e rm a n ,” said the stranger joyfu lly. P a ris, that is true ; but, at all ev e n ts, they go sp e e d ily, w h e n it com e s to t h e w o rst. A las, in G e rm a n y , they m u rder slow ly as w e ll as m ore dreadfully.\ W h ile he spoke these words, he ligh ted a lam p , and turned it toward th e s t r a n g e r ; but, a s i f stricken by lig h t n in g , h e tottered b a c k ­ ward a s he g a z e d upon his features. “ For h e a v e n ’s sak e , w h a t is the m a tter ?” ask e d the stranger. L e P e t it s till g a z e d upon him w ith a stare, but at la s t , w ith great exertion , uttered the words, “ P r in c e M - I ” “ I q the nam e o f h e a v e n ly m e r c y ! do not betray m e ,” im p lored the stran g e r . I t w a s the P r in c e o f . T h e D o c t o r ’s face w o re a sin g u la r sm ile as he replied, “ O h , n o ; there is no necessity for it. B u t does n o t y o u r h i g h n e s s rem em b e r m e ?” T h e P r ince g a z e d upon him a ttentively, and replied at last, w ith evid e n t em b a rrassm ent and a n x i e t y : “ In truth, I ca n n o t call your features to m ind.” “ I b e lieve it,” answ e r e d L e P e t it , hastily; “ g r e a t lords soon forget trifles, but the ca n a ille has o ftentim e s a g o o d m e m o r y 1” W h a t m e a n you ?” in q u ired the P r ince with in c r e a s in g u n e a s in e s s . “ O h , n o th ing,” said L e P e t it , w ith a laugh, then rang for a servan t, w h o brought in w ine and food, and in v ited his g u e s t to fall to w ith a good app e t it e . T h e P r in c e w a s frightfully disturbed. “ H o w do y o u e x p e c t to rescue m e ?” “ I am a t this m o m e n t t h in k ing o f it.” “ L e t m e fly. T h e darkness o f th e night 11 favor m y esca p e .” “ N o , in truth, it w ill not. Sp ies lurk around m y h o u s e — m y ow n servan ts are now w a tching m e . It w o u ld brin g destru c t ion on u s ooth. B u t ea t.” O h , God ! I cannot.” B a h ! drink then 1” and h e filled two g la s s e s , reached o n e t o the P r in c e , and held the other ready to touch it in com p ljm e n t. W ith chattering teeth th e P r in c e touched g la s s e s , and poured the w ine dow n his throat. L e P e t it filled them anew . “ R e s c u e ! r e s c u e !” cried the P r ince, with a heavy sig h . “ Y o u r h ig h n e s s ,” sa id th e D o c tor drily- “ y o u r h ig h n e s s seem s to fear death greatly. W h e r efore did you n o t rem a in in your own land ?” M y G o d ! w h o could forsee this c a tas­ trophe ?” “ W h o ? w h o is there t h a t could not ? B u t you princes could not. and y o u r c o u r tiers coulu n o t ! W h o co u ld fo r s e e th is ca ta s tro p h e ? A h ! so w ill yo u r chiid r e n ask , and your c h ild ­ ren’s child r e n , w h e n th e occa s io n com e s— for y o u learn n o t h in g , and forget n o th ing. Y o u do n o t drink, P r in c e 1 D o you w ish to s leep ?\ T h e P r in c e sh u d d e r e d , and shook his head. H e then related t h e particu lars o f h is arrest, in a h o u s e in w h ich m a n y F r e n c h m e n and foreigners o f r a n k had taken refuge, and then b e g g e d his s t r a n g e h o s t once m o r e 'to till'h im how he e x p e c t e d to sa v e him . L e P e t it seem e d to contend with him self. A t len g t h h e sa id : ‘ I know bu t orie w a y .” T h e P r in c e listened in breath less silen c e , as L e P e t it continu e d : I am an anatom ist. F r o m th e w o rds of the sa n s cu lottes,y o u m a y ha v e rem a rked that o u t o f love and friendship (for I pass with them for a g o o d c it i z e u ) , they often bring the bod ies fresh from ih e gu illo t in e to my hou se. D o n o t sh u d d e r ! I have rescued m a n y a condem n e d one by this m e a n s ; for a s they seld o m e x e r c ise a n y control over my labors, every one w h o , lik e you, is brought to m e a live— t h a t is, i f be is not a kn a v e , and has n o t s p ilt in n o c e n t blood— I save, by dedi eatin g him a victim on the altar o f science, A s , ala s , I never w a n t for su b jects, it has al w a y s been e a s y for m e, thu s far, to deceive th e s e bloodh o u n d s. A ll P a r is curses m e : and if a better party than th a t o f a M arai sh o u ld ga in the upper hand, t h e guillotine w ere th e m ild e s t pu n ish m e n t for t h e m onster. A t p r e s e n t, how e v e r , I am in considerable em b a r r a s s m e n t. I have, in d e e d , one m ale su b ject iu m y h o u s e ; but it is im p o ssible to pass him o f f for your h ig h n e s s , as he h a s a hum p ba c k and very crooked l e g s ; and then there are a nu m b e r o f stu d e u ts o f m edicine am o n g the sa n s culottes w h o le f t you in m . h a n d s . I m u s t show them your dead bod) to-m orrow m o r n ing I T h e only m eans, then, w ere to g iv e you a potion w h ich should lull you in to a death-lik e stupor, th a t w o u ld last until to-m orrow e v e n in g . W h en m y friends com e in th e m o r n ing, w h y I can brin g them to the m a r b le table on w h ich your highn e ss w ill lie stretched o u t lik e a co r p s e .” T h e P r in c e shuddered, and m u ttered ha lf to him self, “ W h o w ill be w a rrant for iu e ? ’ “ Y o u r h ig h n e s s does not tryst m e ,” said the a n a t o m ist, with a sm ile. “ I f y o u knew ne, you w o u ld trust m e still less. B u t I pit)' o u , and ani truly desirous o f sa v in g y o u , as h a v e alread y saved m a n y an in n o c e n t per- “ I f you rescue m e,\ replied the prisoner, l ‘ m y g r a titu d e sh a ll know no b o u n d s ; your lrew a r d sh a ll b e princely.\ L e P e t it drew his face aw ry. “ I said that w « s desirous o f sa v in g your h ig h n e s s .— iF o r r a your resolu t ion .” “ W h e n m u st I take the potion ?” “ N o w — at o n c e .” “ A n d w h e re am I to pass the n ig h t ? ’ “ I m m e d iately upon sw a llow in g it, you-w ill ■ fall in to a stupor, w h ich by d e g r e e s w ill pass ■ i n t o death lik e in s e n s ib ility. A s soon as this ■ t a k e s place, I sh a ll call the servan ts, and tell ■ t h e m th a t you have had a strok e o f apoplexy. ■ Y o u w ill then be carried in to the d issectin g ■ r o o m , and placed upon the m a r b le table.\ ■ “ W h e r e the guillotin e d lie ?” cried the ( P r i n c e . L e P e t it sh r u g g e d his sh o u ld e r s and ropli- B e d , “ I t is necessary.\ “ ( )h, why Ho y o u tell m e o f it V” “ Y o u w ished to hear th e truth. Y e t y o u , I need not be alarm e d ; you w ill be sensib le o f I noth ing, so soon ns you have taken the I d r a u c h t .” I “ N o , n o ! F irst let m e view the pla c e o f I horror.” I L e P e t it started . H o then sp o k e slow ly l a n d ea r n e s t ly . “ D o not d e s ire that, P r ince. I O n ly as a seem in g corpse, and unconscious l o f the extern a l world, w o u ld I bo w illing that ■ y o u should be a d m itted am o n g m y prepara m i o n s . H a r k ! w h a t w a s t h a t ?\ “ W h a t ? ” T h e clo c k struck. “ O u o I T w o I S e e the g ’eain o f m o r n ing. R e s o lv e at o n c e ! B u t a n hour at m o st is ours 1” “ I w ill 1” exclaim e d the P r in c e in d e a t h ­ lik e agony. “ I w i l l ! but I im p lore yo u , let m e fi st view the pla c e 1” L e P e t it g lan c e d w ildly around, and then said , “ W e ll, com e , but the consequ e n c e s be upon your ow n head 1 I ha v e given you fair w a r n ing.” H o took the lam p , beckoned the Princp, and un locked an adjoin in g cab in e t , at the fur­ ther end o f w h ich a door led in to the dissect- ng h a ll. T h e entered. U p o n a m arble table, in the m idd le o f the hall, lay a naked, m is-shap e n body, and near it the bloody head. A lo n g the w a lls were sk e leton s , bottles w ith preparations in spirits o f w ine, and several c h e s ts o f m o d e rate size, furnished with covers. T h e P r in c e trem b led in every lim b . “ T h is is m y private d issectin g room , said L e P e t it ; “ therefore th in g s are arranged on rather a sm a ll sc a le. Y o u see m y whole anatom ical estab lish m e n t, e x c e p t the kitchen for m a c e r a tin g and boiling. H e placed the lam p upon the table, pushed the body a little a sid e , and p o intin g to the em p ty place near it, rem a rked, “ Y o u w ill lie here, i f it please your highness.\ “ B e it s o 1” replied the P r in c e , in stup id in ­ d ifferen c e : “ g iv e m e the potion.” “ W e ll, let us return to my cham b e r .” H e took the lam p from the ta b le again , ahd w a lked toward the door. T h e P r ince turned to follow him ; b u t e x c it e m e n t and alarm had deprived him o f strength ; he t o t­ tered and stum b led . In order to hold him ­ se l f upright, he grasped a t one o f th e chests w h ich stood aga in s t the w a l l ; he overturned it, and it fell w ith him upon th e floor. W ith a piercin g cry, t h e anatom ist sprang forw ard, ca s tin g the rays o f the lam p full upon him , and then cried in fearful tones— “ T h e con s e q u e n c e s be upon your own head I” “ P a r d o n m e ,” m u ttered the P r in c e faintly, as he arose. “ P a r d o n m e ! C o m e aw a y from h e r e — a w a y I G iv e m e — g iv e m e the potion !” A w ild la u g h broke from the lip s o f L e P e ­ tit, the g la s s e s around the w a lls g a v e a shrill e c h o to th e sou n d , and he cried w ith fearful irony : “ G e n tly, m y good sir ; n o t s o fa s t i I told you beforehand that it w ere not w e ll for you to enter m y w o rk-shop a liv e . Y o u r high- 1 , do yo u kn o w w h a t it is th a t lies upon the ground near y o u ? L o o k h e r e ! \ W ith these words he th r u s t his hand in to th e chest, drew forth a h e a d , a n d h e ld it close before the P r in c e ’s face. “ J u l ie t ta / ” ex c la im e d the P r in c e , startin g backw a r d w ith horror. J u lietta 1” re-echoed th e A n a t o m ist, w ith fearful ea r n e s t n e s s . “ J u lietta , the poor, un­ hap p y one, w h o m , though in n o c e n t, thou didst suffer t o be ex e c u t e d ! M u r d e rer! P o iso n e r 1 Or dost thin k I do n o t kn o w th a t it w a s thou w h o poisoned C o u n t A lfred ? L o o k ! D o s t thou n o t rem e m b e r m e ? ” W ith these w o rds, he tore o ff h i s night-cap and peruke, rem o v e d the p a t c h from his eye, and A lfred ’s friend, the dissector o f ------------, stood before t h e a lm o s t lifeless P r i n c e ! “ P a r d o n 1 m e r c y !” h e gro a n e d , and k n e lt a t the doctor’s feet. A violent k n o c k in g w a s now heard a t the street dcor, a n d furious v o ices bellow e d — O p en, C itizen L e P e t i t ! w e are here I” L e P e t it read ju s ted h i s d isgu ise in h a s te, and w a lked tow a r d t h e door. H a v e co m p a s s io n 1” how led th e P r in c e , clasp in g his k n e e s in a co n v u lsiv e em b r a c e . “ It is too la t e / ” rep lied L e P e t it . “ T h e a v e n g in g g o d s d e m a n d their victim . R e ­ pentan c e o n ly is le f t th e e h e r e . H o p e for m e r c y yond e r 1” W ith a stro n g hand he seized th e trem b lin g w r e tch, dragged him in to bis cham b e r , and opened the door. T h e san s -cu lottes poured in . “ W h e r e is the p r is o n e r ? ” th e y cried. L e P e t it pointed to th e sofa, upon w h ich th e P r i n c e lay, half-sen s e less. “ T h e r e , my brave fellow s ! he h a s had a bad n ig h t , bu t he is a liv e y e t — w e ll, han d le him d a in t ily , and m a k e sh o r t w o rk o f it.” D o n o t be un e a s y , citizen . A n d thou shalt have him aga in a s s o o n a s he is d e s p a tch e d .” “ I do not w a n t h im .1’ “ T h e d e v i l !” cried a y o u n g fellow ; “ doc­ tor, are y o u c r a z y ? T o refu s e su c h a nob le subject a s this ?” “ T a k e him thyself, pop in jay, sin c e he p leases thee so m u c h . I w ill hav e n o t h in g to d o w ith him .” V e r y w e ll,” la u g h e d the san s culotte, as he gra s p e d th e P r i n c e by th e co llar, and raised him upon h i s feet. “ C o m e alon g , M o n s ieur!” “ W h ith e r ? ” “ T o the g u illo t in e I” W ith these w o rds, he pu sh e d him tow a r d his c o m p a n ion s . “ G ood m o rning, C itizen L e P e t it 1” L e P e t it w a v e d h is hand in silen c e , turned h is back upon ik e m , and the san s -cu lo ttes left the hou se w ith their prisoner. T h e P r in c ip a lity o f w a s , in the year 1806, incorporated w ith a n e ig h b o r in g k i n g ­ dom , and in 1814 w a s divided in to thirty- e ig h t d istin c t parts. S o o n a f ier the ev e n ts h e r e related , the A n a t o m ist disapp e a r e d from P a r is and from F r a n c e . H e has never parted w ith the head o f the un fortun a te J u lietta. W h e n he dies, his la s t prayer w ill be, “ C o n sign the beauti ful head to rep o s e !” “ S u c h w a s the narrative o f the A n a tom ist,\ said the y o u n g ph y s ician , a s he conclud e d his story. “ I m y s e l f fulfilled th a t la s t prayer. W ith m y ow n hand I buried J u l ietta ’s head iu his g a r d e n , and it h a s lo n g sin c e turned to d ust.\ T h e w o m e n , althou g h p a le a s d e a t h , were well pleased w ith the n a r r a t io n ; but the m en declared th a t i t w a s a s r e v o lt in g a s i t w a s d i a ­ bolical and frightful. ■ W e sh o u ld never consid e r ourselves too old t o learn . S o c r a tes, a t an extrem e ly old a g e , learn e d to play on m u s ical instru m ents. C a to, a t e ig h t y y e a r s o f a g e , thou g h t proper t o learn t h e G r eek la n g u a g e . P lu tarch com m e n c e d the stud y o f L a t in w h e n betw e en seven ty and eig h t y . Sir Ile n r y S p c lm a n ne g lected the sc ien c e s in his you t h , but co m ­ m e n c e d the stud y o f them after he had turn ed fifty. A fter t h is tim e , he b e c a m e a m ost learned an t iq u a r ian a n d law y e r . Dr. John son applied h i m s e lf to the D u t c h langi but a few y e a r s before h i s death. 1i,-~ did not fully com m e n c e his philosopl su its un til he had reached h i s fiftieth ikliu b i c a l pur- year. l i e w h o h a s n o t learn e d the lesson of resolute self-h e lp , has m a d e little progress as a stu d e n t — h a s grow n little toward real i hood. H a l f the world refuses to do its own thin k in g , to toil through th e solu tion o f its ow n k n o tty p r o b l e m s ; hence h a l f the world w h o w ill not do t h is, m u s t be su b j e c t to the o ther h a l f w h o w ill. T h e y w h o do the thin k ­ ing w ill, cith e r directly or in d irectly, do the g o v e r n in g . —?— W e are never so easily d e c e iv e d , as w h e n w e arc plottin g to d e c e iv e others. E D I T O R I A L O O R R E S P O N D E N O E .-X X I . Florence— Theodore Parker—Mr3. Browning— Baron Kirkup—Baron Guldcnstublc—Hiram Powers. A d e ligh t fu l country encircles F loren c e . B e n d your s t e p s w h ither you w ill aw a y from the hum o f the city, and you see old m a n sion s, ch in legen d , beautiful gardens, crystal brooks, su n n y w a lks frequented by stud e n ts and tra v e ler s ; and, further out, v a s t tracts o f country bounded by dark a n d d ista n t m o u n ­ tains. B y the side o f the A r n o , M ilton used to stroll, and to the b a n k s o f th is river, that flow s through th e city, he dedicated one o f his c h o ic e s t poem s. F lo r e n c e is n o t only one o f the favored sp o ts o f nature, n o t only r ich in a s s o c ia t ion s , not only (am o u s for sculpture, p a intin g s and poesy, but is ex c e e d in g ly bless­ ed in her clim a te. T h e r e is v a s t ly le s s of poverty, b e g g a r y , and rags, in F lo r e n c e than in R o m e or N a p le s , T h e dry, g e n ia l atm o s­ phere produces in th e people a g a y cheerful­ n e s s . C a tarrh and c o ld s a r e hardly know n . It is not stran g e that T h e o d o r e P a r k e r fled to tb is Italian city as a la s t hop e o f relie f from w a s t ing consu m p tion. R e a c h i n g F loren c e , and restin g a day, one o f our first v isits, in that lin e o f sig h t seein g , w a s the g r a v e o f T h e o d o r e P a r k e r . It the C e m e lario In g lese. In app r o a c h ing it, on th e le f t o f the avenue, you p a s s the m o n u m e n t erected to th e m e m o r y o f M rs. B r o w n ing, fam e d a3 a poet, and d istin g u ish e d a s an avow e d Sp iritu a list. U p o n the elevated m a rble ere sim p ly the p lain in itia ls, “ E . B . B . ” T h e in s c r ip tion , e x c e e d in g ly u n a s ­ su m in g , se e m s a veritable prophecy from her, se l f in these lin e s — “ A stone above m y heart and head. B u t no nam e w r itten on t h e s t o n e .’’ THEODORE PARKER. U r d e r cypress trees, s h a d in g a plain brow n m a r b le m o n u m e n t, rep o se in th is C em etery all t h a t is m o rtal o f one w h o , n o t only in A m e ­ rica, bu t in all en lig h t e n e d lan d s , liv e s on earth im m o r t a l. T h e sla b h a s only th is in ­ scrip t io n — “ T h e o d o r e P a r k e r . B o r n a t L e x i n g to n , M a s s ., U .S .A ., A u g . 24, 1 8 1 0 ; D i e d a t F l o r ­ ence, M a g 10, I860.-’ S t a n d in g by the grave o f th is m a n , w h o w a s too broad lor a s e c t , and too nob le for a priest, stran g e and deep em o t io n s thrilled m y bein g 's cen ter, and I w a s proud th a t I bad know n him in l if e — p roud that he w a s an A m e r ic a n . W h ile before the pu b lic, h e w a s forced to the g a u n t let o f persecution . C o n servative U n it a r ia n s g a v e him th e cold sh o u ld e r , book- esta b lish m e n t s refused to pu b lish his w r itings, sectarian s sn a r led , a n d prayed w icked prayers a t him . B u t now , h is tom b h a s b e c o m e a sort o f M e c c a , and e v a n g e lica l clerg y m e n , se e k in g health un d e r F lo r e n c e b lu e sk y (a s i f to atone in part for t h e p a s t ) , scatter flow ers upon g r a v e , and w rite clev e r e s s a y s a b o u t h i s sin­ cerity, in teg r ity to prin c ip le, a n d great m o ral bravery o f s o u l. H o w lo n g w ill i t be before they claim him a s a g e n u i n e “ e v a n g e lical C h r istian ?” M r. P a r k e r ’s life w a s m e a sured by d e e d s rather than years. It w a s therefore lo n g , a lt h o u g h he h a d failed to reach fifty, w h e n , lik e a worn and w eary se n t in e l, he laid h is arm o r off, t o en t e r t h e m o re h e a v e n ly life. W e n d e ll P h ilip s , in a w e ll lim e d eu lo g y upon bis “ life and d e a t h ,” sa id , “ H e h a s g o n e up o n e step h igh e r .” Y e s — “ up one step h ig h to b e c o m e the fellow -lah o r c r o f sym p a ­ th isin g sp irits in H e a v e n . T h e true worker con t in u e s his w o rk in th e land o f sou ls, h is la s t hou r s he rem a r k e d , “ T h e r e are two T h e o d o r e P a r k e r s — t h e o n e here sic k and stru g g lin g , th e other a t w o rk a t hom e .” T h e “ one” is still p r e a c h in g through his great tho u g h t s and n o b le d e e d s — t h r o u g h h is le c ­ tures, sp e e c h e s a n d volu m e s ; ih e other, a s ­ cen d e d a n d glorified , is p r e a c h in g through th a t gra n d in s p irational pow e r he im p a r ts the m e d ia o f e a rth. BARON KIRKUP. F r o m the first in trodu c tion , I w a s d e e p ! in terested in this venerab le gentlem a n . T h o u g h born in E n g la n d , he h a s lived for m o re than fifty years in Italy, eith e r in R o m r or F loren c e . l i e h a s devoted his life p a intin g . R a r e and m a g n if icen t are som e the pictures d e c o r a t in g his room s . H e w a s w ell a c q u a inted , m a n y years a g o , w ith th a t w ierd artistic gen iu s , W illiam B la k e , whom brother a r tists o f his tim e considered quei m ad, and decidedly unorthodox in art. N o w , h is old pictures brin g a lm o s t fabulous prices H e w a s, in those “ lon g -ago” yeurs, a Sp irit­ ualist, d e c larin g w ithou t the lea s t reserve that he saw and con v e r s e d w ith sp irits and an- 8 e ls- T h e B a r o n , encircled by d istingu ish e d friends, h a v i n g a m a s s ive library o f books, m a n y ot w h ich treat o f m a g ic aud the unsys- tem a tised ph ilosoph y o f the m y s tics, and being a p r a c tical m e s m e r is t w ithal, w a s brought in ­ to the fold o f S p iritualism ov e r fifteen years sin c e , and he has never shrunk from a frank a v o w a l o f his p r in c ip les. H is dau g h ter the principal m e d ium he co n s u lts. Som e the m a n if e s tation s he h a s w itn e s s e d arc ab s o ­ lu tely astoun d in g . T h e J e s u it s se e in g , a d ­ m itted the facts, bu t pronounced them the w. rk o f the d e v il. T h e recen t efforts o f tL- B a r o \ , directed to the collectio n o f the m a n ­ uscripts, and the restoration o f the painting o f D a n t e , under t h e in spiration o f the great poet him self, have b e e u crow n e d w ith com plete su c c e s s . T h e K in g o f Ita ly, app r e c iat­ in g his lab o r s, conferred upon him , by royal decree, L a C o r o n a d ’ I t a l i a . T h is order n e x t to the royal fam ily, and ranks with the “ Order o f the B a i h s ’’ in E n g lan d . T Baron had previously been “ k n igh ted ” by V ictor E m a n u e l. T h e s e honors, u n e x p e c t e d ’y conferred, he w e a r s w ith the m e e k n e s s o f a child . F a r a lo n g in th e declin e o f life, ho w ill soon be crow n e d w ith im m o rtality. BARON 1IE GUI.DEN8TUBIIB. T h is g e n t lem a n , o f D a n ish descen t, spends his tim e cith e r in P a r is, G e rm a n y , or Italy In person, he is tall, and in general app e a r ­ a n c e com m a n d in g . U n a s s u m in g and am ia­ ble in disp o s ition , h e lives peculiarly, aud is so thoroughly in d ividu a lized , th a t he is con­ sidered eccen tric. T o e d istingu ish e d and titled o f E n g lan d and the C o n tinental co u n ­ tries, care in finitely le s s for “ W h a t w ill the people say ?” th a n A m e r ica n s . T h is pu z z les mo. T h o u g h b e lie v in g in Sp iritualism , it svas n o t till 1856 that the id e a took full possession o f his m ind , t h a t s p irits could com m u iiicate d irectly in their ow n hand w riting, w ithout m edia. T o test the m a tter, he put w h ite pa­ per in to a b o x , locked it, carried the key in his pocket, and told no one o f the purpose in view . T h irteen days after, liftin g the lid o f the b o x , he found upon the pap e r , w riting a n d m y sterious m a rks. F in a lly , by o p e n in g the b o x , and not g o in g ou t o f the sigh t o f \ w r itin g s w o u ld be produced by this unseen agen c y , and tho tests a lso w o u ld b e g 'v e n co n s o lin g ns beautiful. P la c in g w r itin g m a ­ terials upon m o u u m e u ts, sarcop h a g i iu the L o u v re, and placca co n s e c r a ted to certain sain ts, he obtain e d w o n d e r ful proofs o f sp irit individu a lity a n d id e n tity. H e p u b lish e d sixty-seven fac-sim ilies. T h e hand w r itin g o f M arie A n toin e tte and others w a s im m e d ia tely recognized . T h e s e w r itin g s w ere in F r e n c h , G e rm a n , L a tin, G r e e k , P e r s ia n , and th e sy m - bolic characters o f the O r ien tals. T h e B a r o n as put several o f his produ c tion s in to p r i n t : T h o u g h ts from B e y o n d th e T o m b ” is rich in spiritual truths. H is v o lu m e e n t it led , “ T h e R s a lity o f Sp irits, a n d the W o n d e r ful P h e n o m ­ ena o f their D irect W r itin g ,” co n t a in s 216 pages, besid e s the a u t o g r a p h ic pap e r s, and is dedicated to L e C o m te D e S z a p a r y , M o n sieur D 'O u r c h e s, and G e n . B a r o n D e B r e w e r n . T h e book created quite a sen s a t io n in litera r y circles. T h r o u g h o u t F u r o p e , S p iritualism prevails the m o s t exten s iv e ly a m o n g th e no b ility and the U n iversity stu d e n t s ; w h ile in A m e r ica , the “ c o m m o n people\ are th e first to a c ­ cep t it. HIRAM POWERS. G e n iu s ever a sserts its m e n ta l su p e r iority. A ll m e n do it h o m a g e . A m e r ica n s , h ig h ly in tu it ive, are q u ick to se n s e it. N o o n e cross­ in g the A tlan t ic from th e -W e s t for a C o n ti­ nental tour, fails o f se e in g P o w e r s the sc u lp ­ tor. F o r tu n e favorin g , i t w a s our g o o d lu c k to m e e t not only him in his stud io, b u t th e U . S . M inister, Mr. M a rsh. T h e o c c a s io n w as one to be rem e m b e r e d , as th e co n v e r s a ­ tion turned upon art and its d e v e lo p m e n t u n ­ der th e in fluence o f different n a t io n a lities. Mr. P o w e r s, plain in person, y e t prep o s s e s s in g in sp irit, puts on no style, b u t m e e ts y o u w ith that freedom and g e n ia l good - f e e lin g so ch a r ­ a c teristic o f n a t iv e N e w E n g la n d e r s . H e w a s d o ing work in J a n u a r y for our poet, L o n g fel­ low . H is “ E v e ” (P a r a d ise L o s t ) seem e d to us, w h ile the red rays o f th e sun w e r e stre a m ­ in g in a t the w indow s, t o be the very perfec­ tion of artistic concep tion and finish. N e a r it w a s sta n d in g “ Our S a v iou r ,” w h ich is n e t o n ly an ex q u isitely b e a u t if u l p i e c e o f w o r k ­ m a n sh ip, bu t in d e s ig n and ex p r e s s io n it com e s fully up t o o u r id e a o f th e N a z a r e n e ’s perfection s . S t e p p in g in to an ad j o in in g a p a r tm e n t, he pointed u s to E v e r itt, W e b s ter, F r a n k lin, Jefferson, G o v . B u s s , and o t h e r s . A m o n g th e p r o m inent m e n o f th e tim e s , w e saw in o n e corn e r a fine b u s t o f D r . B e llo w s o f N e w Y o rk. M r. P o w e r s is a firm S p iritu a list. T h is is no secret. P o s it iv e evid e n c e s f o r c e d th is con­ viction upon h i s m ind ; but, w h ile a c c e p t in g th e facts as ph e n o m e n a produ c e d b y sp iritu a l in telligen c e s , he does n o t receive m a n y o f the doctrin e s advocated b y S p iritu a lists. R e ­ c o u n t in g to us som e very u n p lea s a n t e x j e - rien c e s , h e ex p r e s s e d d e e p reg r e t s rela t iv e to th e d e c e p tio n s and w e a k n e s s e s o f certa in s p ir­ itu a l m e d ia, and w o u ld se e th e literature o f “ S p iritu a list pap e r s in A m e r ica\ m o re high- toned and solid. T h o u g h no a p o l o g ist for v u lg a r ism s , i t is bu t j u s t ic e to sa y t h a t Sp irit­ u a lism , as a d istin c t m o v e m e n t, h a s not y e t seen years en o u ? h to em b o d y th e scholarship a n d culture o f U n it a r ia n ism . T h e m o re dis­ orderly p h a s e s are p a s s in g aw a y . It h a s now nearly p e if o im e d its first c y c le . T h e secon d , w ith in c r e a s e d p o w e r ,i s a t our doors. “ C om e up h i g h e r !” sa y the a n g e ls. J . M . P . — A n E n g lish w riter h a s recen tly p u b ­ lished a book e n t it led , ‘ H e r e d itary G e n iu s ; ’ in w h ich he a s s u m e s that natu r a l a b ilities a r e transm itted by parents t o their child r e n in t h e sa m e m a n n e r a s t h e form a n d fea t u r e s , an d that it is a s p r a c tica b le to produce a h i g h ly g if t e d race o f m e n by ju d icio u s m a iria g e s , d u r ing c o n s e c u tiv e g e n e r a t io n s , a s t o obtain by careful selection a perm a n e n t breed o f dogs- or horses endow e d w ith any g iv e n q u a lity. P L E A S A N T P A R A G R A P H S . A case o f fem inine d a r in g is re la te d o f a V irg in ia belle, w h o r o d e t o t h e e d g e o f a p r e c i­ pice, and defied a n y m a n o f th e p a r ty w ith w h o m sh e w as r id in g to f o llow h e r . N o t a m a n a c c e p t­ ed th e c h a lle n g e ; b u t a ta n ta l iz i n g y o u t h sto o d on his head in h is s a d d le, a n d d a r e d th e lady to d o t h a t. — A n u r c h in b e in g re b u k e d for w e a r i n g o u t h is s to c k in g s a t th e to e s , r e p lied t h a t i t co u ld n ’t b e h e lp e d —“ to e s w ig g led a n d h e e ls d id n ’t . ” A T e x a s m a n , w h o la te l y c o m m itted su i ­ cide by ta k l u g p o i s o n , l e f t a n o te r e q u e s tin g th a t a knife be buried w i t h him , so t h a t i f lie c a m e t o h e co u ld c u t h is w a y o u t. A d r u g g ist in Y o r k v i lle p laced t h i s c h e e r f u l sig n in h is w in d o w : “ C o m e in , a n d g e t t w e l v e e m e tics f o r o n e s h il lin g .” — A s tr a n g e r o b s e rv in g a n o r d in a r y r o l l e r - r u l e on th e ta b le, to o k it u p , and o n in q u i r i n g its use, w a s a n s w e r e d , “ I t ’s a ru le fo r c o u n tin g - h o u s e s .” T o o w e ll b r e d , a s h e co n s tr u e d p o lite ­ ness, t o ask u n n e c e s s a r y q u e s tio n s , he t u r n e d it o v e r a n d over, u p an d d o w n , a n d a t la s t , i n a p a rox y s m o f baflled c u r io s ity , ho in q u ire d — ‘•H o w in th e nam e o f t h u n d e r , do y o u c o u n t h o u s e s w ith th is? ” — W iv e s w h o do n o t tr y to k e e p th e i r h u s ­ b a n d s , w ill loso th e m . A m a n does t h e c o u r t i n g before m a rria g e , and th e w ife m u s t do it a f te r m a rria g e , o r s o m e o t h e r w o m a n w ill. A l i t t l e boy in F l o r i d a r e c e n tl y d isa p p e a r e d . A p o s t m o rtem e x a m in a tio n o f an a l lig a to r in th a t v ic in ity , revealed th e presen c e o f a han d ful o f to w - c o lo r e d h a ir , a lew bo n e b u t t o n s , and th i r t e e n ch in a m a rb les. — “ J o h n . ” ask e d a p h y s ic ia n o f h is a p p r e n ­ tice, \ D id M rs. G reen g e t th e m e d icin e I o r d e r ­ e d ? \ “ I g u e 6 s so ,” rep lied J o h n , “ f o r I saw c ra p e h a n g in g t o th e d o o r -k n o b , tb is m o r n in g .” — A rude fellow once told Barnum t h a t h e had never exhib it e d any t h in g that wa6 n o t a bare­ faced hum b u g . “ Y es I have,” said B a r n u m ; “ the bearded lady w a sn’t barefaced.” — “ S o n n y , docs y o u r fa th e r ta k o a p a p e r ? ” “ Y es, sir, tw o o f th e m ; ono b e lo n g s to M r. S m ith a n d th e o t h e r t o M r. T h o m p s o n . I h o o k s th e m off th e sto o p .” IIo w m a n y a re th e r e o v y e ’s d o w n th e r e ? ” sh o u te d an Irish boss t o so m e m e n i n a co a l- p it. - “ F i v e ,” w a s th e answ e r . “ W e ll, th e n , the ■ - h a lf ov y e ’s com e u p h e r e ,” said ho. — D o b b s s a y s lie w o u ld hav e d ied o f y e llo w - fever in A u g u s t, i f i t h a d n ’t b e e n f o r o n e t h i u g ; th e d o c to r s gav e h im u p ! — \ H o w m a n y c h ild r e n have I ? \ ask e d a w o ­ m a n o f a rap p in g m e d ium . “ F o u r .” “ A n d how m a n y have I ? ” a s k e d h e r h u s b a n d . “ T w o ,” w a s t h e a s to n ish in g r e p ly . M istak e s o m e w h e r e . — Ono o f a p a r ty o f m u s ical M e n d s , referrin g to an e x q u isite m u s ical c o m p o s itio n , s a i d :— “ T h a t s o n g alw a y s c a r r i e s m e a w a y w h e n 1 h e a r it.” “ Can any o n e sin g i t ?’’ ask e d Jc r r o ld . — A indy m a d e h e r h u s b a n d a p r e s e n t o f a sil­ v e r d r in k in g cu p , w ith an a n g e l a t th e b o tto m . W h e n bhu tilled i t f o r him , he used to d r in k It to th e b o tto m ; a n d sh e ask e d him w h y ho d r a n k ev e r y d r o p . “ B e c a u se, D u c k y , I lo n g to seo tho d e a r l i t t l e a n g e l n t th o b o t t o m .” U p o n w h ich sh e had th e a n g e l t a k e n o u t, an d a devil en g ra v ­ ed a t th e b o tto m . lie d r a n k all th e sam e , an d sh e ag a in ask e il h im th e reason . “ Becauso I w o n ’t leav e t h e old devil a d r o p ,” ho rep lied .

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