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Lamron. (Geneseo, N.Y.) 1974-current, February 22, 1974, Image 8

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PACE SIXTEEN - GENESEO LAMRON - FEBRUARY 22, 1974 J u n i o r V a r s i t y D e f e a t s E l m i r a a n d U . B . T N E c o n o m ic# o f P r o f t w io n * ! Sport# B e h i n d t h e S c o r e b o a r d by N O R B M A Y R H O F E R The sayin g goes \w h e n yo u ’re h o t . . . ” you generally w i n , and even though their oppo n e n t s weren't co ld , G e n e s e o 's Ju n i o r Knights brought their overall record to 10-8 with a pair of well earned victo r i e s over the week. On Friday the club used well balanced scoring and a tough je f e n s e to aefeat Elm ir a 77-72 and on S a t u r d a y the baby B l u e s used a hot shooting hand to dump a highly rated U n iv e r s it y of Buffalo squad 98-93. The victory over Elm i r a w a s a necessary one for the Ju n i o r s if they w is h e d to com p lete the season with a w inning record. Elm ir a cam e into the gam e with only six players w h ich m e a n t that if the K n i g h t s had any kind of a game at all, the Ea g les would be hurting for bench strength. That is exactly what happened as one starter fouled out and all four others were playing with four personals each. A n d y Lo n g , a 5-10 guard for the visito r s , kept the s o a r ing E a g l e s in the gam e in the first half with his deadly 20 foot j u m p e r s . O v e r a ll, the Eag les displayed a fine t o u c h throughout the night a s t h e y hit for over 4 6 % . Geneseo played both a man-to- man and a zone defense in the gam e w h ic h seem e d to rattle the guests for m o s t of the gam e . The Eagles led for only a short time m idw a y in the second half but G S U won the game by ouscoring them 15-11 over the final six m inutes. Paul Tu b i n i s led the G e n e s e o scorers with 21 p o i n t s , follow e d oy M a rc Dunn with 16 and the G i n t w i t h 14. K e n B r e m b s gathered in the m o s t ca r o m s , 1 1 . The follow ing evening the club travelled to Buffalo to face the alw a y s tough Baby B u l l s . U . B . shot an average 39% from the field while the B l u e s hit on an im p r e s s iv e 4 9 % . Fo r the night the hosts had t h e i r t r o u b l e s in the first half a s they hit on only 9 of 41 sho t s w h ile G S U w a s building up a 44-31 lead. In the second h a l f the B u l l s r a i s e d t h e i r shooting percentage to alm o s t 50% (26/53) but G e n e s e o co n t i n ­ ued to hit the boards and the nets for the final five point m a r g in. W a y n e G inty and Paul T u b i n i s combined for 32 points ( 32 for Tubinis) w h ile M a rc Dunn set a le w J . V . a s s i s t record with 18 to 30 along w it h h i s 15 p o i n t s . The Knights outrebounded their guests 37-29 as S t r a u s s and B r e m b s com b ined for 23. C O M M E N T S : It took a little w h i le in co m ing but the entire club s e e m s to be p l a y i n g w e l l tog e t h e r ...everyo n e had a hand in both v i c t o r i e s . . . P a u l T u b i n i s is beginning to show the form that w a s expected of him early in the s e a s o n . . . P a t Burke played well against U . B . , scoring 14 points w h ile snaring seven re b o u n d s . . . . with four g a m e s left in the s e a s o n one thing that is still hounding the club i s t u r n o v e r s ... if they are to win three of the next f o u r , they m u s t s t o p giving aw a y up to 30% of their offen s e each gam e . t e r m p a p e r s t e r m p a p e r s Quality, Originality Security $2.75 per page SEND NOW FOR LATEST CATALOG. ENCLOSE $2.00 TO COVER RETURN POSTAGE Hours: Mon-Fri 12 noon - 8 p.m.; Sat 12 noon • 5 p.m. ESSAY SERVICES 57 Spadina Avenue, Suite 105 Toronto, Ontario, Canada Telephone: (416) 366-6549 Our research material is sold for research assistance only, not as a finished product for academic credit S i n c e t h e R a t h s k e l l a r w i l l b e c l o s e d F r i . , M a r c h 1 s t a t \ 7 p . m . f o r F i n a l B i d s (S u b s n' S u d s w ill run from 1-7) [ M O N T A N A I S B A C f o r y o u r l i s t e n i n g a n d d a n c i n g p l e a s u r e i n L E T C H W O R T H L O U N G E f r o m \ l f y o u m i s s t h i s y o u ' l l k i c k y o u r s e l f h e r e t o M O N T A N A a n d b a c k A D M I S S I O N 2 5 e B E E R 2 5 A r b i t r a t i o n . T h a t ' s the new word in sp o r t s esp e c ia ll y n o w , in b a s e b a ll O w n e r s t h i n k the w o r d is o b s c e n e . M o s t * p l a y e r s are overjoyed at its a c c e p t a n c e . U n d e r a new agreem e n t reach ­ ed between c l u b ow n e r s and the M a jor Leag u e Baseb a ll P layers A s s o c i a t i o n , a n y player who d e c l a r e s an im p a s s e in co n t r a c t negotiations can apply for arbi­ tration. H o c k e y and b a s k e t b a ll players regularly let t h e ir law y e r s do the talking at co n t r a c t tim e . W h e n a baseball player elects the proces of arbitration, he and his team each su b m i t a final sa l a r y fig u r e . One of 14 men previously agreed upon by both the p layers a s s o c i a t i o n and the ow n e r s is called in. A f t e r hearing argum e n t s from both s i d e s , the arbitrator c h o o s e s one figure or the other a s the p layer's sa l a r y for that year. W it h the deadline for applying for arbitration over T u e s d a y , about 45 p l a y e r s have subm it t e d their nam e s for t h e p r o c e s s . That figure co m e s from a sp o k e s m a n for Marvin M iller, the executive director of t h e p layers a s o c i a t i o n . S p e c u l a t i o n i s that p l a y e r s will tend to co m e o u t of arbitration hearing s on the upper end of th i n g s , and sa l a r i e s in b a s e b a ll w i ll even t u a ll y jum p u p w a r d s to m a t c h the high p a y c h e c k s in basketball and h o c k e y . Soaring sa l a r i e s of p l a y e r s in all spo r t s m a k e ow n e r s w i n c e . A num b e r of non-ow n e r s in various s p o r t s a l s o th i n k e x o r b i t a n t salaries do m o re harm t h a n good. A m o n g tho s e in the latter group i s B o b y H u l l , player-coach of t h e W o rld H o c k e y A s s o c i a t i o n W innipeg J e t s . H u l l , d e s p it e his w o n $2.75 by J I M W I L K I N m i l l i o n , 10 -year c o n t r a c t , s a y s today’s lucrative d e a l s are s p o i l ­ ing p l a y e r s . The veteran of 17 y e a r s of profesional h o c k e y , Hull f e e l s the sud d e n su r g e in s a l a r i e s has created a lot of dead w o o d . H e m e n t i o n s the f a c t that he had to sh a k e up a f e w “ fat c a t s ” on h i s own team . “ It j u s t se e m s to be hum a n nature these d a y s , ” s a y s H u l l . “ A s long a s a guy w a s m a k ing $ 10,000 to $ 20,000 a y e a r , it kept him d o w n to earth. But w h e n he su d d e n l y started m a k i n g $50,000 or $ 6 0 ,0 0 , then he felt he w a s so m e t h in g he w a s n ’t . \ O ld - T im e r s b l i s s f u l l y recall the “ g o o d old d a y s \ w h e n p l a y e r s used to p la y for “ p r a c t i c a l l y no t h i n g ” b e c a u s e they loved the sp o r t , w h a t e v e r one it w a s , so m u c h . O t h e r people hold the op i n io n that the o w n e r s have been raking in all the p r o f i t s in recent ye a r s and the p l a y e r s are ju s t now beg i n n i n g to sh a r e in the w e a lt h they w e r e m a i n l y re s p o n s i b l e for creatin g . W h i c h e v e r view you take, there arise s the q u e s t i o n of w h e r e sp o r t s are headed as sa l a r i e s co n t i n u e their c l i m b . W ill p l a y e r s begin to battle o w n e r s more vig o u o u s l y than o p p o n e n t s ? O r , a r e p l a y e r s sim p l y getting their d u e ? Here's hoping that the s i t u a ­ tion co r r e c t s itself and h e a d l i n e s about player-ow n e r c o n f l i c t s do not begin to cro w d the sp o r t s th e m s e l v e s to the b a c k page of the sp o r t s se c t i o n . BASEBALL H e a d ing the list of players e l e c t i n g th e new a r b i t r a t i o n p r o c e s s are S a l B a n d o , Req.qie Ja c k s o n , and G e n e T e n a c e of the w o r l d - c h a m p i o n O a k land Athlet­ ic s , Dave M c N a l l y , P a u ! Blairniirt B o b b y G r ic h from the Baltimore O r i o l e s , and Craig Nettles and G e n e .M ich a e l of the New y orK Y a n k e e s . Th e ow n e r of t h e O a k land club C h a r l e s O. F i n l e y , a l s o owns m o re p r o b lem s th a n any other m o g u l . Mr. F i n l e y cu r r e n t l y ■ m_ 10 -players cl is s a t is i fiod enough w i t h his final offer to opt <o-' arb i t r a t io n . Never one to s t a y awav trom the quotable p h r a s e , Finley, on h is w a y to arb i t r a t io n m e e t ings ir, S a n F r a n c i s c o , s a i d , \T h i s will give them (the A ’s) a chance to take me o n . ” T h e ow n e r added that he p l a n s to argue each d i s p u t e p e r s o n a l l y . The f ir s t c a s e ever heard rn the arbitration p r o c e s s was that of D i c k W o o d s o n , a pitcher for the M in n e s o t a T w i n s . At the end of a fo u r - h o u r s e s s i o n earlier this w e e k with W o o d s o n , Tw ins' P r e s id e n t C l a r k G r i f f i t h s , and their a t t o r n e y s , arbitrator Harry H. Platt said a final contract w a s file d . Platt d e s c r i b e d the hearing a s “ a n h i s t o r i c o c c a s i o n . ” T e r m s of the co n t r a c t were not revealed, not even to W o o d s o n . He d o e s n ’t even know what he w i ll be m a k ing for the 1974 b a s e b a l l s e a s o n . “I’m signed n o w , ” s a id W o o d s o n , “ but i don’t kn o w for how m u c h until Mr. Platt m a k e s his d e c i s i o n . ” I d o n ’t k n o w . . . . i f I s a t t h r o u g h a four-hour m e e t i n g to determine m y sa l a r y , I th in k I ’d ask some q u e s t i o n s if I w a s the only one that d i d n ’t kn o w b o w m u c h I w a s m a k i n g a f t e r co m in g out. B i n g h a m t o n P i n s G r a p p l e r s The G e n e s e o m a t m e n dropped a hotly co n t e s t e d 22-17 m a t c h to B i n g h a m t o n last T u e s d a y night at B i n g h a m t o n . The K n i g h t s , al­ m o s t p u ll ing o f f an up s e t of the N C A A ’ s 9th ra n k e d C o l l e g e D ivision t e a m , held an e a r l y lead only to see it evaporate a s th e y failed to point in their last s i x bouts. H i g h l i g h t s of t h e m a t c h in c l u ­ ded Ed G e r a c e ’s 7-0 deck of Ed C e r a r and D a y m o n d C l a r k ’ s exciting 5-5 draw with R i c k W i l c e . Ai Solom o n ran his record to 15-0 with another forfeit. The m a tch w e n t into the final bout with B i n g h a m t o n holding a narrow 19-17 lead. W ith a g g r e s ­ sive frosh Dan M u r p h y m o v e d up to the unlim it e d c l a s s the upset certainly se e m e d p o s s i b l e . T r a i l ­ ing Dean S c h o l s b e r g 10-9 late in the t h ir d perio d , M u r p h y d e s p e r ­ ately tried for the reversal th a t would give the K n i g h t s the m a t c h . H o w e v e r in his effort M u r p h y w a s n e a r l y p inned and lost by a 16-9 tally. The S U N Y A C T O U R N A M E N T held in Brockport th i s p a s t weekend w a s indeed a d i s a p ­ pointm e n t for t h e K m g h t s a s th e y could m u s ter no better than one third arid one fourth. Al S o i o m o n , G e n e s e o ’s b e s t hope for a first at 118, lost an overtim e decisio n to O s w e g o ' s T o n y L a v a l l e in the se m i - f i n a l s . In th i s bout he suffered a m ild c o n c u s s i o n w h i c h kno c k e d him out of further co m p e t it i o n . Dayrnond Clark earned a trip to the N a t i o n a ls by cap t u r i n g third by F R A N K I E F I R P E L L O place at 134. H is o n l y defeat w a s a 5-3 d e c i s i o n to W i l c e . Ju n i o r Ed G e r a c e ran into p r o b l e m s at 142 a s he d r o p p e d tw o c l o s e d e c i s i o n s to B i n g h a m t o n ’s Cerar, w h o he had defeated T u e s d a y . E n a b l i n g him to grab f o u r t h place ho n o r s w a s a 3-2 d e c i s i o n of defending ch a m p P e r a z z a of P o t s d a m . M A T M E M O S : Solom o n will not w r e s t l e R o c h e s t e r a n d probably w i ll be held out of action until the n a t i o n a l s . . . . Dan M u r p h y wrestled w e l l in t o u r n a m e n t , pinning C o r t l a n d ’s M a c Neill and l o s m g t o B u c k h o l z of B r o c k p o r t in the last 15 s e c o n d s . , . . N Y S Invitational th i s w e e k e n d . . . U n i v e r s i t y o f P a r i s N e w P a ltz P h ilo s o p h y Year Qualified undergraduates in Philosophy and various other majors can earn from 30 to 32 credits taking regular courses at the University of Paris [Sorbonne] during 1974-1975. Students select their courses from the full range available to regular French students. The S U N Y Program Director will help students secure suitable housing and arrange programs, and will assist or arrange assistance f<»t them in their studies throughout fhe v a September 15 to June 15. A three-week orientation and intensive language review will be held at the start. Estimated living expenses, transportation, tuition, and fees, $ 3 , 0 0 1 3 . Mditional information may be had by writing te Professor David Blankenship, Department oi Philosophy, FT 1 0 0 0 , State University College, New ^ Paltz, N e w York 12561. Telephone: [ 9 1 4 ] 2 5 7 ^ 6 9 6 ^ 1 ii. u

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